Being denied employment because of a credit check :( - page 4

Hi, I graduated last year..In order to get the job, they told me that they have to run a credit check on me..I know that I owe a lot of money to creditors but what my potential employer does not know is that I have a bank account... Read More

  1. 0
    Quote from Mommy Nurse2b
    all financial advice aside - this situation STILL makes no sense. OP does not have bad credit. This IS for a hospital job right? You aren't a nursing student wanting a bank job or something?
    Geez - most hospitals I think would like the idea you need some $ to pay bills. Hey more OT you are willing to work! :chuckle

    Edited to add: perhaps this thread is really the answer and the hospital pulled at straws for a denial of employment http://allnurses.com/forums/f8/termi...do-238991.html
    I think you might be onto something Mommy Nurse2b. Being fired from the first 2 jobs is more likely the reason for denial of employment than a high dept with a good credit score.

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  2. 0
    Quote from gr8rnpjt
    To add insult to injury, this deadbeat is garnishing my wages for $250 a month spousal support, AND I HAVE CUSTODY!!!!

    Anyway, after living this nightmare for the last 6 years, I would hate to think my future employer will turn me down for a job because of my credit history!!!!
    They do have something called an innocent spouse clause. Wonder if it could help you in this case?

    I've got almost $5,000 in medical bills that have gone to collection. I would have never incurred these debts if I had understood the so-called health insurance I had would not pay for it. So, I'm rather bitter about this and too stubborn and angry to even attempt to pay anything on them.

    But if it came down to it I would want to know how they expect you to pay bills with no job. That is like when they take a driver's license and still insist you go to work for x amount of time to prove you deserve to have it back. Go to work on what, a pogo stick?
  3. 0
    Quote from motorcycle mama
    They do have something called an innocent spouse clause. Wonder if it could help you in this case?

    This can not be applied in my case. Innocent spouse has to do with income tax.
    We both filed in Domestic Relations Court, he for spousal support, and I for child support since I have physical custody of our son.
    I make more than him because he was too lazy to work a full time job and only took jobs that did not requre a urine drug screen (wonder why?) So, me being a nurse, I make more, he makes nothing, even though I had to move him out of my home due to daily physical, mental, verbal and emotional abuse of my family, he gets protected by domestic relations law and there is no recourse for an injured spouse to prevent this. My attorney actually appealed the spousal support and the judge said, "I can't hear any of this. He can be a lousy parent and a bad husband and he is still entitled to that money":angryfire:angryfire:angryfire
  4. 0
    Quote from ukstudent
    I think you might be onto something Mommy Nurse2b. Being fired from the first 2 jobs is more likely the reason for denial of employment than a high dept with a good credit score.
    Ahhh ... now the picture becomes clearer ...

    Thanks for the link, Mommy Nurse 2B and ukstudent.
  5. 0
    Quote from Dunno?
    My credit rating is excellent..I am at 780..I pay 6% interest on my credit cards..
    What you don't realize is that realize that in the long run, you'd save more money if you took your savings to pay down a lot of your credit card debt.

    Think about it:
    • Most savings accounts top out at 4-5% interest (there's almost nothing that pays more than than that without you going into the world of CDs, money markets, etc.).
    • Meanwhile, you're paying 6% interest PER CREDIT CARD. And based on your post, it sounds like you have a lot more in credit card debt than you have money in that savings account.
    • Neverminding that the minute you're late with a payment, almost every credit card will jack your interest up to the maximum allowed (around 22%), no exceptions. Put 22% against 4% and see how that comes out.
    So...you're throwing away excess money by paying interest to the credit card company that a. you don't have to pay if you paid your debt down faster; and b. the interest generated from your savings account isn't covering.

    If you think what you're doing is the best thing for you, then I guess that's what you have to do. I don't know any more about your financial circumstances except what you've shared here. But as everyone's mentioned, credit score isn't everything. A lot of places do consider how much unsecured debt you are also carryin because they want to know if they're taking a risk on you. After all, if you've got very large amounts of debt, they might be hesitant to place you in a position where you have easy access to money/valuable merchandise (the logic being that it might be a temptation, especially if your financial situation worsens).

    No, I can't say that's a fair attitude...but that's the attitude a lot of places have.

    Credit rating is only one factor that they look at. I know people with horrible ratings and yet more cash on hand than I'll ever have because they have zero debt. Go fig.
    Last edit by Meriwhen on Aug 9, '07
  6. 0
    Quote from Meriwhen
    Think about it:
    • Most savings accounts top out at 4-5% interest (there's almost nothing that pays more than than that without you going into the world of CDs, money markets, etc.).
    • Meanwhile, you're paying 6% interest PER CREDIT CARD. And based on your post, it sounds like you have a lot more in credit card debt than you have money in that savings account.
    • Neverminding that the minute you're late with a payment, almost every credit card will jack your interest up to the maximum allowed (around 22%), no exceptions. Put 22% against 4% and see how that comes out.
    When I was working on paying off my debt, I set aside "x" amount of money each month to go toward the cards. The cards with the lowest APR got the minimum amounts, and the card with the highest got all the rest of the "x" amount. I was never late.

    Example: $1000 per month to credit cards. Cards A, B, & C had low rates and I paid them the minimums: $50, $100, & $150. The other $700 went toward Card D since it had the highest rate. When Card D got paid off, the $1000 was divided the same way among Cards A, B, & C.

    MBNA evidently got tired of only getting the minimum. They jacked my rate from 2.9% to 22%. When I called, they said it was done because I wasn't "making enough progress" on my debt. Guess they weren't satisfied getting minimal interest from me. I promptly called one of my other card companies & negotiated a deal to transfer that balance. Now MBNA doesn't get any of my money!
  7. 0
    Quote from Psqrd
    Your financial plan is so bad, I can't even bring myself to comment!
    P2
    I don't think the above post is very nice or very helpful. Actually it is downright rude.

    The OP stated that she chooses to carry balances on low-rate credit cards. Sounds like she has thought it through and made a decision to carry balances, although maybe different from the Suzi Orman or Clark Howard schools which advocate paying more than minimum payments.

    If she pays her minimums each month, I do not understand why that would be considered "bad credit" by an employer.

    I hope a potential employer doesn't balk when looking at my student loan debt. That balance is downright scary but I plan to sacrifice some fun for a few years after school to make double payments on those.

    Good luck to the OP. I think you will find an employer who will not expect a new hire to be debt-free and financially independent.
  8. 0
    Quote from motorcycle mama
    You are NOT saving money by paying the minimum each month and putting the rest into savings. The longer you go not paying off these debts the more you will be eaten alive with interest fees. Do the math and figure it out.

    You need SERIOUS financial counseling.
    Absolutely . .. .start out with a trip to Barnes and Noble and read the chapter in Suze Orman's Book "Women & Money" on page 88. Then buy the book.

    steph
  9. 0
    Quote from pacifica
    I don't think the above post is very nice or very helpful. Actually it is downright rude.

    The OP stated that she chooses to carry balances on low-rate credit cards. Sounds like she has thought it through and made a decision to carry balances, although maybe different from the Suzi Orman or Clark Howard schools which advocate paying more than minimum payments.

    If she pays her minimums each month, I do not understand why that would be considered "bad credit" by an employer.

    I hope a potential employer doesn't balk when looking at my student loan debt. That balance is downright scary but I plan to sacrifice some fun for a few years after school to make double payments on those.

    Good luck to the OP. I think you will find an employer who will not expect a new hire to be debt-free and financially independent.
    It isn't helpful to encourage or commend anyone to carry such an obviously bad financial plan either. I don't think the comment was rude, it was one of shock.
  10. 0
    Quote from sjt9721
    [/list]When I was working on paying off my debt, I set aside "x" amount of money each month to go toward the cards. The cards with the lowest APR got the minimum amounts, and the card with the highest got all the rest of the "x" amount. I was never late.

    Example: $1000 per month to credit cards. Cards A, B, & C had low rates and I paid them the minimums: $50, $100, & $150. The other $700 went toward Card D since it had the highest rate. When Card D got paid off, the $1000 was divided the same way among Cards A, B, & C.

    MBNA evidently got tired of only getting the minimum. They jacked my rate from 2.9% to 22%. When I called, they said it was done because I wasn't "making enough progress" on my debt. Guess they weren't satisfied getting minimal interest from me. I promptly called one of my other card companies & negotiated a deal to transfer that balance. Now MBNA doesn't get any of my money!
    Don't even get me started on how much I hate MBNA. They are truly evil. They did the same thing to me and when I called to try to negotiate down my interest rate (after making payments on time for two years) they refused.

    That company wa very happy to offer me sky-high credit limit at 9.99%, then jacked up the rates without notice. Thank god I just paid that balance off. Lesson learned.


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