As a single nurse were you able to buy a home? - page 7

But realistically are you able to live comfortable and own a home on $24/25 an hour? Or do you think it's better for a nurse who is single to rent? I'm not sure how taxes and home owning expenses... Read More

  1. by   johsonmichelle
    If you do not think you're financially comfortable to own a home then I would strongly advice to wait to buy a home. I have worked with a lot of realtors and landlords, selling your home or renting is not easy. Remember there are other costs to owning a home , owning a home is not easy, there is a reason why there was a house market crash.
  2. by   Jules A
    Quote from johsonmichelle
    Like I said , Maryland is expensive, maybe in the very rural you get a house for $750 a month. Plus mortgage companies are getting very picky these days. I live in Baltimore, they purposely keep certain areas expensive to keep certain people out. You will defiantly not get a nice house for $150,000 in the downtown of Baltimore especially close to the inner harbor. Many people have told me that they could buy mansion with of money we have to pay for houses down here. Like I said , it all depends on the on where original poster lives.
    Maryland is expensive and if you have your eye on the inner harbor no way are you going to get much for your money there however there are decent, safe neighborhoods where $150,000 will buy a modest home in Baltimore City and the surrounding suburbs.
  3. by   Jules A
    Quote from johsonmichelle
    If you do not think you're financially comfortable to own a home then I would strongly advice to wait to buy a home. I have worked with a lot of realtors and landlords, selling your home or renting is not easy. Remember there are other costs to owning a home , owning a home is not easy, there is a reason why there was a house market crash.
    I totally agree that if someone doesn't feel financially comfortable then buying a home is a bad idea but the reason there was a housing crash imo was largely based on the unrealistic expectations of the home buyers during that time frame.
  4. by   TheCommuter
    Quote from Jules A
    I totally agree that if someone doesn't feel financially comfortable then buying a home is a bad idea but the reason there was a housing crash imo was largely based on the unrealistic expectations of the home buyers during that time frame.
    Yep. I was living in California, ground zero of the 2008 housing meltdown, during the early years of the real estate boom. When I worked at a paper products plant in southern California from 2001 to 2004, many of my working-stiff coworkers were buying $500,000+ houses on incomes incomes in the $50k to $60k range.

    In addition, these factory workers were educated at the high school diploma or GED level, meaning their positions in the job market were very precarious. If a guy with a GED and a $50,000 income is laid off or terminated, it is almost impossible for him to obtain another job that pays similarly.
  5. by   johsonmichelle
    Quote from Jules A
    Maryland is expensive and if you have your eye on the inner harbor no way are you going to get much for your money there however there are decent, safe neighborhoods where $150,000 will buy a modest home in Baltimore City and the surrounding suburbs.
    Can list a place thats decent in baltimore city that you can get for $150,000 and has a good school system?
  6. by   johsonmichelle
    Quote from TheCommuter
    Yep. I was living in California, ground zero of the 2008 housing meltdown, during the early years of the real estate boom. When I worked at a paper products plant in southern California from 2001 to 2004, many of my working-stiff coworkers were buying $500,000+ houses on incomes incomes in the $50k to $60k range.

    In addition, these factory workers were educated at the high school diploma or GED level, meaning their positions in the job market were very precarious. If a guy with a GED and a $50,000 income is laid off or terminated, it is almost impossible for him to obtain another job that pays similarly.
    Its just not blue collar workers , there is also a lot of working professionals who buy houses that are above their means.
  7. by   TheCommuter
    Quote from johsonmichelle
    Its just not blue collar workers , there is also a lot of working professionals who buy houses that are above their means.
    Here's the main difference: in many cases, the educated professional (doctor, engineer, pharmacist, etc) has a more stable position in the employment marketplace than the assembly line worker who lacks a high school education.

    The assembly line worker's life is precarious because (s)he might never find another decent job again if fired from the current one, whereas the educated professional can use his/her credentials to secure employment or reinvent oneself.
  8. by   Jules A
    Quote from johsonmichelle
    Can list a place thats decent in baltimore city that you can get for $150,000 and has a good school system?
    C'mon really? It depends on your opinion of a good school system. For myself if I were looking for a reasonable neighborhood I'd consider Parkville, Perryhall, Randallstown, Dundalk and GlenBurnie.
  9. by   johsonmichelle
    Quote from Jules A
    C'mon really? It depends on your opinion of a good school system. For myself if I were looking for a reasonable neighborhood I'd consider Parkville, Perryhall, Randallstown, Dundalk and GlenBurnie.
    Decent is subjective. Most of the places are in Baltimore COUNTY.

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