artificial feeding-Terri Schiavo - page 39

I posted this here becaue I think this subject is something that we as nurses deal with on a regular basis.....Many many people state that they have a big problem with the feeding being stopped... Read More

  1. by   Mandee
    Jim, I'm just curious as to what your wishes are, if you would want to be maintained on artificial nutrition if you were in Terri's shoes.
  2. by   danu3
    Quote from wannaBEanRN
    I do that too, Dan!!

    They all made it through the bank though. Guess they didn't care that the check was written 30-some-odd years ago! :chuckle
    You are kidding! They made it through? Guess they must have a "birthday" policy or something. This might not be as uncommon as I thought...


    -Dan
  3. by   NoCrumping
    Here is a side note.....No matter what the outcome of all this, Terri Schiavo's parents should use their notariety to send a public message on how an eating disorder can kill/and or destroy your life as you know it.

    Re: tube in, or out? I just dont know. My opinion is that a. she will not improve b. that IS suffering c.I think it is very comparable to being given a paralytic without being sedated. (her condition) . And I cant imagine suffering more than that.
    Her parents are being incredibly selfish......and they have every natural right in the world to be so. Most of us have the luxury of not having to make or fight for these decisions. God bless all of them.
  4. by   NoCrumping
    .

    Should they be allowed to do that? Good question. I say yes.[/QUOTE]

    Thanks Tweety......so if the parents were out of the equation, would there even be a debate?
  5. by   NoCrumping
    Quote from Kyriaka
    I question his motives.

    Last time she was removed from food/water, her parents wanted a priest to giver her last rites. The husband refused.

    There has been a sworn statement from Terri's nurse that her husband came into the room and asked, "is the b*tch dead yet?" and "I am going to be rich!"
    I thought she was jewish......and, sworn statement or not, I bet my right foot that is a LIE.
  6. by   webblarsk
    Quote from KB75

    My professor brought up a good point about this case as well. Why is it that congress held an emergency meeting to make a ruling on this case when there are some many other issues regarding healthcare that gets swept under the rug. It's sad how politicians find a way to manipulate situations for there personal gain.
    I have wondered the same thing!
  7. by   NRSKarenRN
    [color=#cc3333]american nurses association statement on the terri schiavo case
    3/24/05
    the terri schiavo case raises complex and emotional issues about the end of life. the american nurses association (ana) recognizes the difficulty of the situation, however, ana has consistently upheld the right of patients, or if the patient is incapacitated, the right of the designated surrogate, to decide whether to submit to or continue medical treatment. www.nursingworld.org/pressrel/2005/pr0323.htm
  8. by   Tweety
    Quote from NoCrumping
    .

    Should they be allowed to do that? Good question. I say yes.
    Thanks Tweety......so if the parents were out of the equation, would there even be a debate?[/QUOTE]

    No question whatsoever. If doctors decide that the patient qualifies under Florida law to have a tube feeding removed, then there would be no issue. There are checks and balances here, ultimately it's the MD who orders the tube feeding removed, so people just can't go around pulling tube feedings. But under current law, it's the health care surrogate, which is always a legal spouse, can pull a tube feeding on a person. Apparently Mr. Shavio has met all of the qualifications, under much scrutiny, case after case, appeal after appeal.
  9. by   CHPN1680
    As I sit here reading postings, I can hear in the backgound continuous reports on Fox news about Terri's case. It is rather unfortunate that what should be a personal matter has become such a media circus!

    At least some good has come of this. People are actually completing Living Wills and designating Health Care POA's. One can only hope that the courts will upohold our written wishes!
  10. by   ldynwht
    [QUOTE=icyounurse]i think that they should just let that poor woman die with some dignity. i can understand where her parents would have a hard time letting go--but my god its been over 10 years. shouldn't they start the greiving process? i mean, does anyone see the irony in the fact that she ended up like this because of anorexia and now her parents are force feeding her brain dead body? i really don't think anyone with body issues that severe would want to be on cnn with a bad haircut drooling on themselves. i personally WOULD NEVER WANT TO LIVE LIKE THAT and neither would most people.
    who is paying fort his anyway? just curious. :angryfire[/QUOT


    Thank You. Her parents have said Terri would not want to be deprived of food and water but that is exactly what she did to herself, it is why she is in this state.
  11. by   UnewmeB4
    Quote from danu3
    I posted this before. But here it is:

    [font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]http://www.miami.edu/ethics2/schiavo/CT%20scan.png

    This is a CAT scan of Terry's brain (not sure when it was taken, don't think it is recent). It is from a reputable site (University of Miami).

    You don't need to be an expert to see that she has this huge ventricle in her brain (the big blue blob in the middle). If you look closely, the same shade of blue in the ventricle are also all over the brain (especially toward to top part of the brain). You do see the white stuff (I pressume those are brain tissue) sort of are here and there however mixed in with the deep blue (the ventricle color).

    So as for your question, technically according to this scan, you do not have liquid instead of a cortex because you can see the brain tissue (assuming I am interpreting it right given that I have no idea how to interpret a CAT scan, I am just doing educated guesses here). However, you can see there is quite a bit of damage all over the brain (especially in the middle and up on top).

    Obviously with that much structural damage, it is going to adversly affect function also (as we all learn in A&P).

    -Dan

    I can't believe people have still not read this! It is unbelievable...imho. We in nursing are so much into "evidence based practice". It is in the court records. You may also want to quit vilifying Michael. You would be quite surprised to read all he HAS done for Terri.

    There is very interesting comments made by a Father Murphy, who tesified in court. Something he said really struck me. It is cases like these that drive the Eutanasia/right-to-suicide people.

    Dan, thank you so much for putting this site up again. I think is is very important, as there is no media interpretation.
  12. by   KarafromPhilly
    About the husband's motives--does anyone else think that he might be acting out of loyalty to Terri? That is, he's hanging on and won't divorce her because he KNOWS that she didn't want to live like this, so allowing her parents to care for her in her present state would be abandoning her? I like this idea--is this a really strange thought?
  13. by   Penguinurse
    A question for those who support reinserting the feeding tube (and this is an honest question, not an attack :

    If there were incontrovertable proof, such as a living will or videotaped statement, that this patient wouldn't want to be sustained artificially, would you still support her parents fight to keep her on the feeding?

    I ask because I'd like clarification about your reasons for supporting the feeding...is it a general issue, meaning that you believe no one should ever be removed from a tube feeding, or an individual issue, because there is no such proof that this patient ever said she wouldn't want to live this way?

    If a lot of people around the country believe that no one should ever come off a tube feeding, that's scary to me...does that mean we are obligated to use any/all technology available in every situation? Case in point: when I was in the OR, one of our ortho surgeons did a bipolar hip replacement on a woman who was 104 yrs. old, end-stage dementia, GT, unable to communicate with the world, contracted into a fetal position. She'd been dropped during a transfer. :stone

    Thanks to all who post rational, polite entries...we don't have to agree, but let's all respect.

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