artificial feeding-Terri Schiavo - page 26

I posted this here becaue I think this subject is something that we as nurses deal with on a regular basis.....Many many people state that they have a big problem with the feeding being stopped... Read More

  1. by   MrsWampthang
    I don't agree with government interference in this case, and I know I definitely would not want to live like Terri is living, but I don't understand why Michael keeps fighting Terri's mom and dad. Why doesn't he just divorce Terri and get on with his life? That way her parents would have what they want, to keep thier daughter in this sad state for the rest of her natural life, her husband could live a normal life without the media circus surrounding him. That is the only thing that really bugs me about this.

    Pam
  2. by   RN Rotten Nurse
    Quote from Dixiecup
    Contrary to popular belief, if the feeding tube was removed she would not starve to death but die of dehydration. Dehydration is a peaceful and painless death.I did a hugh research paper on this subject and people are misinformed.
    Have YOU ever been severely dehydrated? I have! It makes you continually nauseated and your skin even hurts. I sure as heck don't want to die that way.
  3. by   Kyriaka
    Quote from RN Rotten Nurse
    Have YOU ever been severely dehydrated? I have! It makes you continually nauseated and your skin even hurts. I sure as heck don't want to die that way.
    ______________
    I think that this presumption that dehydration is "peaceful" is going on the given that the person is brain dead.

    If they are not, the person is given a sufficient amount of painkiller. But I have a hard time believing Michael Schiavo will let his wife have painkiller. I think he wants to make her suffer in every way possible.
  4. by   Spidey's mom
    Quote from RN Rotten Nurse
    Have YOU ever been severely dehydrated? I have! It makes you continually nauseated and your skin even hurts. I sure as heck don't want to die that way.
    You are right - We are mixing up patients here - brain dead or even comatose and dying patients are completely different than Terri, who is not in a coma or brain dead and does respond and is healthy. She would experience the same things children in Africa experience when they dehydrate/starve . . .

    steph
  5. by   kaykay
    Quote from Traumamama59
    I don't agree with government interference in this case, and I know I definitely would not want to live like Terri is living, but I don't understand why Michael keeps fighting Terri's mom and dad. Why doesn't he just divorce Terri and get on with his life? That way her parents would have what they want, to keep thier daughter in this sad state for the rest of her natural life, her husband could live a normal life without the media circus surrounding him. That is the only thing that really bugs me about this.

    Pam
    GOOD question... Maybe he doesn't divorce her because there is no benefit in it for him... he probably has a life insurance policy on Terri as well as the remaining money in the "trust" set up for her "care"... its disgusting
  6. by   James Huffman
    Quote from kaykay
    GOOD question... Maybe he doesn't divorce her because there is no benefit in it for him... he probably has a life insurance policy on Terri as well as the remaining money in the "trust" set up for her "care"... its disgusting
    Important to remember: if he's listed as the "owner" of any life insurance policy, then he would keep the policy even in the event of a divorce. It's also possible (this is sheer speculation -- I have never heard anything about insurance, or not) that she is the "owner" of any policy, in which case control would be in the hands of her -- or whoever is operating as her power of attorney. In the case of a divorce, obviously, it would no longer be in his hands.

    One who is the owner of a policy can change the beneficiary of a policy. If the insured is not the owner of the policy, she can't change the beneficiary, even though the policy is on her life, except under very unusual circumstances.

    Jim Huffman, RN
  7. by   nursepotter05
    What money could there possibly be from an insurance policy? I would guess that after fifteen years of medical care, there would be enough medical bills to take every bit of any insurance he might have gotten. Wouldn't the hospitals,LTC facility, hospice, ect file against her estate and take the insurance money when she dies?
  8. by   kaykay
    Quote from TNnurse05
    What money could there possibly be from an insurance policy? I would guess that after fifteen years of medical care, there would be enough medical bills to take every bit of any insurance he might have gotten. Wouldn't the hospitals,LTC facility, hospice, ect file against her estate and take the insurance money when she dies?
    The money would be from a life insurance policy and if Michael is the beneficiary, then the money would go to him. Since she is most likely on Medicaid, those bills from hospitals, etc. are considered paid. Don't forget, you can buy a huge term life insurance policy for minimal amounts.
  9. by   James Huffman
    Quote from kaykay
    The money would be from a life insurance policy and if Michael is the beneficiary, then the money would go to him. Since she is most likely on Medicaid, those bills from hospitals, etc. are considered paid. Don't forget, you can buy a huge term life insurance policy for minimal amounts.
    However, the only time Ms. Schiavo would have been "insurable" from an insurance standpoint would have been prior to the initial incident that disabled her -- in other words, 15 years ago, when she was 26. I don't think you could find an insurance company anywhere that would insure her now.

    The reason I'm skeptical about there being a life policy on her is that most people -- with large exceptions -- don't think about life insurance at age 26.

    Jim Huffman, RN
  10. by   danu3
    Quote from Kyriaka
    ___________
    Dan,

    You bring up a good point. There are people involved with hospice who have said this woman doesnt fit the qualifications of hospice.

    You right with the confusion with hospice. The Hemlock Society (which gives advise on how to kill yourself) has nurses who work for them. Their literature uses key words where someone might think they are hospice.
    Well, I don't know about in Fl. But in Ca, you need to have 6 months or less to live (estimated by doctor) to be in hospise. If Terry does not have a terminal condition, she would not be in hospice in Ca.

    Does the Hemlock Society purposly use words to make people think it is hospise?

    -Dan
  11. by   kellyo
    Don't know why I feel compelled to post. I had a totally different view before I saw the videos on terrisfight.org. Now I know that these were taken years ago, but I saw the face of a woman who lit up when her mother spoke to her. I saw life... Her parents may be wrong to cling to the idea that she will improve, but if there is one thing I was once told and now know, you never give up on your children.

    Mr. Schiavo may be Terri's spouse by law, but the day he began living a life with another woman and started a family with her is the day he gave up being her husband...
  12. by   Kyriaka
    Quote from TNnurse05
    What money could there possibly be from an insurance policy? I would guess that after fifteen years of medical care, there would be enough medical bills to take every bit of any insurance he might have gotten. Wouldn't the hospitals,LTC facility, hospice, ect file against her estate and take the insurance money when she dies?
    _____________
    The life insurance money is differant than the malpractice settlement money (which I believe is paying for her care at this time).
  13. by   Kyriaka
    Quote from James Huffman
    However, the only time Ms. Schiavo would have been "insurable" from an insurance standpoint would have been prior to the initial incident that disabled her -- in other words, 15 years ago, when she was 26. I don't think you could find an insurance company anywhere that would insure her now.

    The reason I'm skeptical about there being a life policy on her is that most people -- with large exceptions -- don't think about life insurance at age 26.

    Jim Huffman, RN
    _____________
    I also doubt she would be given life insurance at this point. I have Lyme disease and cant get it!

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