Are You Really a Nurse? Are You Really a Nurse? - pg.4 | allnurses

Are You Really a Nurse? - page 4

Test Your Knowledge Before reading the article, take the short true or false poll at the bottom of the article to test your knowledge. Do you cringe when people use the word “nurse” loosely?... Read More

  1. Visit  Daisy4RN profile page
    #39 3
    It is important that only LVN or RN's use the term nurse. Otherwise it diminishes the profession. It totally urks me when someone is called, or calls themselves a nurse when they are clearly not. When a patients family etc. tells me they are a nurse, I respond with, Oh, are you a LVN or a RN, shuts um up every time.
  2. Visit  Floyd Nightingale profile page
    #40 2
    reply to CatCare on previous page -

    I was having lunch and listening to a group of young people at the next table who were obviously techs. I got a little steamed when they started talking about passing meds, where can techs pass meds?, and I looked and they were wearing t-shirts from a local dog daycare center that offered grooming, boarding and, apparently, veterinary services.

    Can they call themselves nurses somewhere? I dunno, but I wouldn't have the first idea of what end of a dog to start on so I'll grant them the privilege by default.
    Last edit by Floyd Nightingale on Dec 21, '16
  3. Visit  MrChicagoRN profile page
    #41 6
    Quote from jen9317
    I completely agree. I knew a lot of my classmates who did not pass the NCLEX exam but because they had graduated, still called themselves nurses. Another peeve of mine is when CNAS call themselves nurses because "It's in their name". So I've been told. They always want to be included in "Nurses" meetings.
    "I'm Dwight Shuppe, Assistant Manager at Dunder Mifflin."

    "no Dwight, you are assistant to the manager."

    "It's the same thing...Assistant Manager."

    "No, Dwight..."
  4. Visit  OCNRN63 profile page
    #42 1
    Quote from riggy3
    Current practice in Pennsylvania an LPN or RN wears identification to clearly show LPN or RN this equates to licensure. Years ago we were not allowed to identify ourselves as an RN this was a gimmick by the hospital to pass off the assistants to the patients as Nurses. I remember going to legislators to get this change made.
    The only person who should be called a Nurse is the LPN or RN. I worked hard for my BSN, MSN, RN. I encourage all nurses to speak up when someone misrepresents themselves. Nurse aides, CNA and Medical Assistants are not not Nurses

    I've been an RN in Pennsylvania for 30+ years; I was never forbidden to identify myself as an RN, and I have worked for different employers over the years.

    I agree that in the past it may have been the practice in some institutions to try to muddy the waters, so to speak, and give patients and family the false impression that staffing levels were better than they really were.
  5. Visit  lnvitale profile page
    #43 1
    Sorry to burst the bubble, but calling oneself a nurse without being an RN or LPN/LVN is not a punishable offense in every US state.

    The terms "graduate nurse" and "student nurse" are used frequently where I live and no one died.

    Relax.
  6. Visit  GitanoRN profile page
    #44 3
    Needless to say, this situation ceased to exist in the facility where I work. Having said that, several years ago doctors, PA's, patients and their relatives couldn't tell who? was who? since all departments wear scrubs. Therefore, we "Nurses" RN's, LPN's and LVN's decided to vote for our own color of scrubs in order to distinguished one nurse from any other medical staff. For example: all RN's including ADN, AAS,ASN, BSN, MSN, plus all other specialties of RN's voted for black scrubs w/2 white stripes on the sleeves. Furthermore, the LPN's decided to go with the same scrubs but in a "Turquoise"color the "Techs" decided on a Hunter Green, the Medical Assistants Purple" color, and housekeeping kept their Gray color scrubs. At this level, pamphlets are giving to patients and relatives once they visit our facility, indicating the scrubs color with a picture of each individual color and their status. Moreover, on every patients room there is a visible picture indicating the above mentioned next to "Your Nurse name is, and today's date. Unquestionably, our new medical staff, patients and their relatives no longer address a housekeeping or any other personnel as a nurse by mistake. On the other hand, there were a few RN's that didn't care for the color assignment because Hmm' how should I phrase this... they felt that they would be call upon more often. However, the majority was all for it.
  7. Visit  Longleggedstar profile page
    #45 1
    Quote from JWG223
    Legally, yes, there can be issues. Personally? No. I don't care if Raggles the Wino huddled in the parking lot calls themselves a nurse. It doesn't make my job any harder, nor does it affect compensation for doing my job, so I don't care. I did not become a nurse to satisfy any aspect of ego.
    Personally, I'm the same I started nursing right out of high school, I got my LPN and then went on to get my RN. As an LPN I worked in LTC and all the patients called the CNA's nurses. I guess at the time I was so young it just didn't really matter. I was just trying to do my job and not kill anybody as the years went by I've just kind of accepted that some people make that mistake. In the big scheme of things call me janitor just don't touch my pay!
  8. Visit  oldtiredmicn profile page
    #46 3
    I totally agree with all the comments but want to remind many that have in the past (and some currently still do) turn there badge so no one can read their name or status. I've seen this a lot in the office setting but much more in the hospital setting. Since a lot of facilities have replaced the pin on name-pin with the plastic ID badge it is happening more. I think a lot of this is a fear of liability - the idea that if they can't see your name or status you are immune and have privacy. Not so!
    I was a corpsman who out of the service took the boards and became an LVN but was working in an expanded role as an ER Tech. I was told to remove my LVN pin and do not wear a name pin that said LVN but ER Tech. That riled me and we got that policy changed. When I got my RN and passed the boards I was defensive when someone called me orderly or Doctor. I always corrected them. Nursing in general has allowed so many of our responsibilities to be take over by other specialties - we used to do the breathing treatments and respiratory assessments, we used to do the EKG's and actually interpret the rhythm strip. We used to be the resource for info about medications. We used to give out information and discharge plans and write care plans. Now that is being done by other specialties or even worse yet by some COMPUTER - that has absolutely no caring or compassion and we as advocates for our patients have passed to the shadows to allow less involvement and work. We have allowed the changes. We have allowed the watering down of our profession. When I first started in this profession I was called a Male-Nurse. No I wasn't!!! I was a NURSE and I am still even though retired! Proud of the title - proud of the work - and proud of my job!
  9. Visit  Longleggedstar profile page
    #47 1
    Quote from oldtiredmicn
    I totally agree with all the comments but want to remind many that have in the past (and some currently still do) turn there badge so no one can read their name or status. I've seen this a lot in the office setting but much more in the hospital setting. Since a lot of facilities have replaced the pin on name-pin with the plastic ID badge it is happening more. I think a lot of this is a fear of liability - the idea that if they can't see your name or status you are immune and have privacy. Not so!
    I was a corpsman who out of the service took the boards and became an LVN but was working in an expanded role as an ER Tech. I was told to remove my LVN pin and do not wear a name pin that said LVN but ER Tech. That riled me and we got that policy changed. When I got my RN and passed the boards I was defensive when someone called me orderly or Doctor. I always corrected them. Nursing in general has allowed so many of our responsibilities to be take over by other specialties - we useQUOTEdo the breathing treatments and respiratory assessments, we used to do the EKG's and actually interpret the rhythm strip. We used to be the resource for info about medications. We used to give out information and discharge plans and write care plans. Now that is being done by other specialties or even worse yet by some COMPUTER - that has absolutely no caring or compassion and we as advocates for our patients have passed to the shadows to allow less involvement and work. We have allowed the changes. We have allowed the watering down of our profession. When I first started in this profession I was called a Male-Nurse. No I wasn't!!! I was a NURSE and I am still even though retired! Proud of the title - proud of the work - and proud of my job!
    Oh yeah! I forgot about the people who don't show their badges on purpose. And you say Allowed our professions to be taken over by other specialties? I say we fought then did a thank you praise the lord holy dance! Maybe you had it way worse, but to be honest I don't think its watered down at all with all the new procedures and regulations everyday in the ICU is full of patient and paperwork task up to my neck!
  10. Visit  suburbiafeelsu profile page
    #48 1
    Here in Washington, nursing assistants are licensed by our DOH to practice as nursing assistants.
  11. Visit  KatNewby profile page
    #49 3
    Firstly, I want to clarify something. As a CNA, I actually am state licensed. I was certified when I finished my CNA classes, but had to pass the state practical & written exam to receive my license.

    Secondly, I am not a nurse & do not refer to myself as one. I call myself a "nurse aide" to residents and their families.

    I have a bachelor's in psychology & am applying to several accelerated BSN programs, and I can't wait to use the title "nurse" once I have earned it!
  12. Visit  TriciaJ profile page
    This issue has nothing to do with our egos or how hard we worked to become nurses. It is a matter of professional credibility and public safety. The public has a legal right to know who is providing any aspect of their care. They should not be allowed to believe a nurse is providing them anything unless an actual nurse is doing the providing. Whoever misrepresents him or herself as a nurse is committing an act of fraud.

    Think about it this way: you go to your doctor's office and a nice man in a white coat comes in, examines you and makes some recommendations. Then you find out he is the janitor. So? He works in a doctor's office, so he must know as much as a doctor by now, right? But you're not buying it, because he isn't a doctor.

    The second issue is professional credibility. When I am providing health information, it is based on my education, experience and expertise. The recipient knows the information is being provided by a registered nurse. Suppose they are given erroneous information by someone who isn't a nurse, but they were led to believe the person was a nurse. That makes it much harder to trust nurses, so anyone who pretends to be a nurse hurts the credibility of the entire profession.

    The law exists to protect our integrity as a profession. Nothing to do with anyone's ego or personal preference.
  13. Visit  ZEBRA57 profile page
    #51 1
    Precisely!! Very well expressed!

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