Are For Profit Schools really BAD?

  1. I am changing careers at the ripe old age of 40. I am working through my prerecs now but I honestly don't have years and years to work towards a) getting into a public school program, which in my area can take YEARS!

    I have always thought poorly of "for Profit" education (now realizing I'm not sure why I thought that...) but as I am facing a mid-life career change I am thinking it might be the best option for me.

    I am in the Denver area and could apply and likely graduate from Denver School of Nursing before I could even get accepted to my local community college ADN or AAS program (Front Range Community College)

    My question is- are they really that bad? Will anyone want to hire me if I get a job from a "for profit" school?

    THANKS fr your guidance!
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  2. 39 Comments

  3. by   roser13
    They're not necessarily all bad.

    They are, however, EXPENSIVE.

    If you can afford the outrageous costs, then look into the individual for-profit schools that you're looking at.
  4. by   Guy in Babyland
    One of the most important benchmarks when choosing a school is their NCLEX pass rates. Denver School of Nursing is good:

    Baccalaureate Degree Programs

    Denver School of Nursing

    year number pass rate
    2011 91.72%
    2012 152 94.08%
    2013 206 87.86%
    2014 223 80.27%
    2015 305 86.56%
    2016 70 91.43% YTD

    ASN
    2012 81 92.59
    2013 89 82.02
    2014 107 81.31
    2015 71 74.65
    2016 49 91.84
    2017 10 100.00 YTD
  5. by   Sour Lemon
    Quote from Schneid1
    I am changing careers at the ripe old age of 40. I am working through my prerecs now but I honestly don't have years and years to work towards a) getting into a public school program, which in my area can take YEARS!

    I have always thought poorly of "for Profit" education (now realizing I'm not sure why I thought that...) but as I am facing a mid-life career change I am thinking it might be the best option for me.

    I am in the Denver area and could apply and likely graduate from Denver School of Nursing before I could even get accepted to my local community college ADN or AAS program (Front Range Community College)

    My question is- are they really that bad? Will anyone want to hire me if I get a job from a "for profit" school?

    THANKS fr your guidance!
    Cost can be a huge issue, especially at a "ripe old age", but I don't know what the difference would be between the two programs. Just make sure you're not setting yourself up to be in debt for longer than you're capable of working.
  6. by   klone
    As far as for-profit schools go, DSoN is not bad, and hireability should not be an issue. But it is EXTREMELY expensive.
  7. by   Schneid1
    Wow everyone thank you so much for chiming in here. In case it is relevant I want to work in an ED.

    I know the cost is so much higher, but the tradeoff would be finishing and starting my new career sooner. Would love to hear any other insights but I am encouraged by what I have heard so far!
    Last edit by Schneid1 on Aug 9
  8. by   meanmaryjean
    Quote from Schneid1
    Wow everyone thank you so much for chiming in here. I know the cost is so much higher, but the tradeoff would be finishing and starting my new career sooner. Would love to hear any other insights but I am encouraged by what I have heard so far!
    I guess you need to decide which you choose to live with: A decade or more of crushing student loan debt (run the numbers- it will make you sick) OR patience and an affordable degree.
  9. by   Boxer Mama
    I went to DSN (I guess now DCN), graduated with my BSN. I did not have a problem finding jobs because of the school. I was accepted into a highly competitive residency program. Like you, I went there due to being able to a quicker start date. Please feel free to PM me if you have any further questions!
  10. by   RNperdiem
    How much would this cost, and how long would it take you to pay off your loans, if you take out loans?.
    Would nursing give you a pay increase, pay about the same or involve a pay cut compared to where you are working now?
    How are you set for retirement and emergency funding?
    If you did not get into ED right after graduation, would you be okay working in a different department until you could find an ED job?
    If you are willing to drive or move, could you try a public program in a less busy community college? My sister lived in a rural area, and the community college had fewer applicants.
  11. by   Schneid1
    Colorado is CRAZY there are only a handful of public programs and I just went to an orientation meeting for one of them where we were told it can take 3 or MORE applications (which happen every 6 months) to get in- and you can' apply until all prerecs are completed. SO, I am weighing the cost of not doing anything for a few years (I quit my job to go back to school) and applying and reapplying to the public program, vs taking out bigger loans but having the income sooner.
  12. by   turtlesRcool
    Is moving an option? There are many areas where public programs are easier to get into.
  13. by   Schneid1
    unfortunately with 2 kiddos in school and a working spouse it isnt an option- but I am considering how far I am willing to drive for classes!
  14. by   dienw
    NCLEX pass rates are a poor way to evaluate a school. The NCLEX pass rate only tells you what percentage of their graduates pass the NCLEX. What you really need to know is what percentage of the people who originally enroll pass the NCLEX. Attrition rates in for-profit schools are generally high. If 95% pass the NCLEX but only 75% of the students who start actually graduate, that's not very good. Many schools, both for-profit and taxpayer funded schools give exit exams to manipulate the pass rate percentages. If you don't do well on the exit exam, you aren't allowed to graduate. This prevents weaker students from taking the NCLEX.

    The other thing you want to know is how many students graduate on time, not just graduate. The accrediting agencies consider on-time graduation to be 150% of the scheduled program duration. If you take 6 semesters to complete a 4 semester program, technically you are considered an on time graduate.

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