Are CNA's considered "Nurses"? - page 5

I am a new nurse but was a CNA for 15 years before going to school. I was never referred to as a nurse when I was a CNA. I recently went to work in a Doc office where the CNA refers to herself as a... Read More

  1. by   KK92RN
    Quote from Alnamvet
    Sounds like I exposed a raw nerve, eh? Well, just keep studying, get your RN, maybe an MSN, and let me know how you feel then...bottom line...there is no longer room in health care today for minimally prepared providers. An RN should be the bare minimum for nursing practice, and all titles referring to a nurse less than an RN should be eliminated. Ancillary staff, preferably, would be EMT's or Paramedics, who come prepared with a broad, and expansive set of skills, most usefull IN the hospital setting. Lastly, attack the message, not the messenger, hon...
    I think you did. but the truth is companies can't afford to pay for all that education. hell they can't even keep us staffed now. we need pca's and lvn's to help us deliver the quality of care people are finding harder and harder to get. the hospital i am at has different levels and the cna and lvn are required to take ce classes that deal with current stuff they may have to deal with. lvn are getting acls and tncc certification. truth be told i have worked with some lvns i would prefer to have as my nurse than some rns.
  2. by   leslie :-D
    sigh....................unfortunately hon, some rns grossly lack the 'people' skills that are so crucial to superior nursing care.
  3. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Quote from Alnamvet
    Sounds like I exposed a raw nerve, eh? Well, just keep studying, get your RN, maybe an MSN, and let me know how you feel then...bottom line...there is no longer room in health care today for minimally prepared providers. An RN should be the bare minimum for nursing practice, and all titles referring to a nurse less than an RN should be eliminated. Ancillary staff, preferably, would be EMT's or Paramedics, who come prepared with a broad, and expansive set of skills, most usefull IN the hospital setting. Lastly, attack the message, not the messenger, hon...
    Um who said i was attacking you? Was your name in my post that you quoted? No. And do not ever refer to me as "hon", that's very patronizing.
  4. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Quote from earle58
    sigh....................unfortunately hon, some rns grossly lack the 'people' skills that are so crucial to superior nursing care.
    Isn't that the truth....
  5. by   Dixiedi
    Quote from LPN2Be2004
    I'm just proud of any education i've received. It's just sad when people don't see any education as being important unless it equates to theirs.
    RNs, in general are taught in school that LPNs and CNAs are not good enough. Just becasue the LPN and CNA do not have degrees does not mean they are not quite capable of doiong the job they do.
    THis whole thing just keeps reverting back to RNs thinking they are the only ones capable of caring for a pt. CNAs have been trained to be observant while bathing, pottying, etc. THey then report those findings to the nurse.

    LPNs are trained to provide care which requires critical thinking and the nursing proccess. When we find something amiss? We carry it to our charge nurse or the MD. Kind of suprise any of you RNs? Yea, we are not just bathers and bedpan pushers. We actually understand A&P and ....
  6. by   Spidey's mom
    Quote from Dixiedi
    RNs, in general are taught in school that LPNs and CNAs are not good enough. Just becasue the LPN and CNA do not have degrees does not mean they are not quite capable of doiong the job they do.
    THis whole thing just keeps reverting back to RNs thinking they are the only ones capable of caring for a pt. CNAs have been trained to be observant while bathing, pottying, etc. THey then report those findings to the nurse.

    LPNs are trained to provide care which requires critical thinking and the nursing proccess. When we find something amiss? We carry it to our charge nurse or the MD. Kind of suprise any of you RNs? Yea, we are not just bathers and bedpan pushers. We actually understand A&P and ....
    I didn't learn that LVN's and CNA's were not good enough when I was in nursing school - must have missed that class.

    I worked as a medical assistant occasionally in a doc's office while in school and he and I had a contract that I could learn and perform certain tasks that he wanted to teach. I have no idea now if that was even legal but I did do alot of "nurse" type stuff.

    I don't get all caught up in labels . . .when the CNA and I go into a patient's room we just introduce ourselves and get on with it.

    I love my CNA's!

    steph
  7. by   angel337
    Quote from Dixiedi
    RNs, in general are taught in school that LPNs and CNAs are not good enough. Just becasue the LPN and CNA do not have degrees does not mean they are not quite capable of doiong the job they do.
    THis whole thing just keeps reverting back to RNs thinking they are the only ones capable of caring for a pt. CNAs have been trained to be observant while bathing, pottying, etc. THey then report those findings to the nurse.

    LPNs are trained to provide care which requires critical thinking and the nursing proccess. When we find something amiss? We carry it to our charge nurse or the MD. Kind of suprise any of you RNs? Yea, we are not just bathers and bedpan pushers. We actually understand A&P and ....
    when i was in school for my rn i don't ever remember being taught that lpn's and cna's are "not good enough". we were taught that everyone (lpn's, cna's, physical therapists etc.,) are all part of a multidisciplinary team that work together to provide ultimate care to the patient. i think it is degrading that anyone would think such things. the funny thing about this issue is that some docs view anyone that is not a doc as "bathers and bedpan pushers". in every profession there will always be a hierarchy of people that feel that their main job in life is to make others feel inadequate. we all must be proud of what we have achieved and not look to others to validate the importance of our roles. you can only validate yourself, because as soon as you think you have achieved a higher status there is someone behind you saying "i am still better than you, i have my xxx degree or i am going for my xxx certification". it never stops. when i was a MA and a tech people put me down for not being a rn, now that i am a rn with a bsn people ask when am i going for my masters or why don't i go to school to be a doctor. for some reason i feel that people want me to apologize for being a bedside nurse and i don't. i am comfortable and confident with my career decisions and if i ever progress to something else it will be because i want to not because of the need to seek approval from others.
  8. by   missmercy
    Quote from Dixiedi
    RNs, in general are taught in school that LPNs and CNAs are not good enough. Just becasue the LPN and CNA do not have degrees does not mean they are not quite capable of doiong the job they do.
    THis whole thing just keeps reverting back to RNs thinking they are the only ones capable of caring for a pt. CNAs have been trained to be observant while bathing, pottying, etc. THey then report those findings to the nurse.

    LPNs are trained to provide care which requires critical thinking and the nursing proccess. When we find something amiss? We carry it to our charge nurse or the MD. Kind of suprise any of you RNs? Yea, we are not just bathers and bedpan pushers. We actually understand A&P and ....

    Where do those RNs go to school?! We were most certainly NOT taught that CNAs and LVNs were not as good as we were!! Major generalizations like that can really get under folk's craws!! I value the members of my care team regardless of their educational level -- we all have important roles and if we do them well, we make a great team!! My level of respect tends to drop when someone (rn, lvn, aide, tech, transoirter, volunteer) gets a major chip on their shoulder and "cops a tude" -- being a hard working, ethical professional is what counts and knowing the differences in the LEGAL division of labor -- YOUR SCOPE of PRACTICE -- that's what we were taught!
  9. by   movealong
    Are CNAs nurses? No.

    Are LPN's nurses? Yes

    Do I look down on them? No
  10. by   Darlene K.
    Quote from Alnamvet
    CNA's, NA, LPN....need to go by the way side....safe care comes from broadly "educated" and "trained" RN's and ARNP's. The time has come to eliminate so-called caregivers who's only training is how to do a BP, change a diaper, d/c an IV, and administer a limited amount of drugs. The times are a changin', and the need for poorly prepared wannabees is ending. What we need is to increase the standards, require that ALL health care providers take the same pre-reqs as a pre-med, pre-nursing, pre-PA...after the pre-reqs are met, one may choose the MD/DO route, nursing route, Paramedic route, PT route. This will place ALL on the same playing field, and eliminate further discussions about who is better prepared, better educated, better trained, etc. The only differences, in the end, may be compensation, but what you choose, after your pre-reqs, should not get in the way of having earned the respect and privilege of a well educated and trained health care provider.

    "Go by the way side"? If we ALL were as educated as you, then who would do your dirty work? Do you want to change diapers and give bedbaths?

    I have a problem with your quote "The times are changin', and the need for poorly prepared wannabees is ending". There is a need in health care for all of us. I am an LPN and I am a Nurse. I have a great deal of respect for those who have had the opportunity to obtain the BSN. If everyone had a BS degree, yes, we would all be educated. But that would not make you respected or a well trained health care provider. If you treat the people who work under you in the manner that you speak, you are probably not as respected as you might think.
  11. by   Sheleigh7
    I have been working as a CNA for the past 6 months while finishing my prerequisites for nursing school. I previously earned a BA in Multimedia 10 years ago. Many nurses have told me that working as a CNA is an invaluable experience when you become a nurse. As a side note, the CNA's are also treated with the respect they deserve. To completely smack down the role of a CNA is uncalled for and rude. I know many CNA's who are not only well educated, but valuable to the RN's about changing conditions of patients etc. To say that CNA's are wannabees is abhorrent. Many people who work as CNA's are forced to do so by retraining programs in their state. We also save time for nurses who are busy with meds and treatments (I work in LTC). Furthermore, many states are requiring individuals to be CNA's before starting nursing school. With the amount of people applying for nursing school who think it's a great job in theory, might work as a CNA and find that they are uncomfortable caring for patients. CNA's are also paid poorly for doing very difficult work. I can't tell you how many times daily I lift and transfer patients, and also take the time to hold someone's hand who is scared. Working as a CNA has made me realize how much I want to be a nurse, and I will treat CNA's with the same respect that I expect.
  12. by   Dinith88
    CNA's 'do' nursing at it's base level. They clean, bathe, feed, sooth, and attend to patients....the same way NURSES did throughout history.

    In our modern world, however, nurses have evolved and become something quite different (due to technological revolutions, medical science, etc.). The role of say an icu nurse, ER nurse, Nurse anesthetist, etc.(for example) are all modern variants of nursing that would be alien to nurses 100 years ago.

    The point i'm trying to make i guess is that a good 'CNA' would have been a good 'nurse' in Florence nightengale's time....but the nurses around Florence (including Florence herself) would require a great deal of re-training, re-education, and culture-shock if expected to 'step in' for one of us today. Modern nursing has an identity all it's own.

    So..if you want to split hairs, No, a CNA is not a nurse..BUT, a CNA does the work that has it's roots set firmly in what nursing Is, was, and always will be.
  13. by   KK92RN
    Quote from Dinith88
    CNA's 'do' nursing at it's base level. They clean, bathe, feed, sooth, and attend to patients....the same way NURSES did throughout history.

    In our modern world, however, nurses have evolved and become something quite different (due to technological revolutions, medical science, etc.). The role of say an icu nurse, ER nurse, Nurse anesthetist, etc.(for example) are all modern variants of nursing that would be alien to nurses 100 years ago.

    The point i'm trying to make i guess is that a good 'CNA' would have been a good 'nurse' in Florence nightengale's time....but the nurses around Florence (including Florence herself) would require a great deal of re-training, re-education, and culture-shock if expected to 'step in' for one of us today. Modern nursing has an identity all it's own.

    So..if you want to split hairs, No, a CNA is not a nurse..BUT, a CNA does the work that has it's roots set firmly in what nursing Is, was, and always will be.

    totally agree with you. and some nurses miss that aspect of spending quality time with thier patients and providing holistic care. nowadays the cna's are spending more time with the patients while we get to do paperwork

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