Another rant regarding MA's and Nurses - page 4

by samirish

5,654 Views | 51 Comments

I know I've read on here multiple times regarding MA's calling themselves nurses but now its not even the ma's but the doctor's office they work in calling them nurses. I feel this is so misleading and done deliberately. I... Read More


  1. 0
    Medical Assistants DO have a scope of practice, I'm not sure where you are looking at, but if you look on the Govt. website...http://www.bls.gov/oco/ocos164.htm it says what medical assistants can do.

    On another OFFICIAL site it states What is the scope of practice of a medical assistant? In some states medical assistants have a clearly stated scope of practice, but in some states there is no law on the matter" (http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/580647_2)

    From The Medical Board of California

    Are medical assistants required to be licensed or certified by the State of California to perform procedures within their "scope of practice"?

    No. Medical assistants are not licensed, certified, or registered by the State of California. However, the medical assistant's employer and/or supervising physician's or podiatrist's malpractice insurance carrier may require that the medical assistant be certified by a national or private association. A medical assistant must be certified by one of the approved certifying organizations in order to train other medical assistants. (Title 16 CCR 1366.3)
    (http://www.mbc.ca.gov/allied/medical...estions.html#2)

    As far as INDEPENDTLY doing phone triage , No we aren't supposed to do it. What we do, like I stated previously,is speak with the pt get their signs and symptoms and report back to the doctor on what was documented, then after the MD reviews what they need to review, tells us what to say to the pt. That is what we do. If you wish not to speak with an MA you can always ask to leave a message for the doctor to specifically call you back. You don't have to speak with them.

    As far as stating MA's knowledge is as far as knowing how to take an accurate BP is harsh and it's ignorance on people's part to believe that. I don't have a certificate, I have an Associates in Medical Assisting from an accredited junior college. I have taken an passed with a 3.8 gpa total in : Pharmacology, A&P 1,2, Microbology, lifespan,English comp,chemistry, my course also had x-ray,EKG and phlebotomy. A lot of Medical assistants start off this way to make sure they are certain ths is what they want to do.

    I understand that some MA's are ok with calling theirselves nurses, and that's not acceptable. But to belittle us, like we are second class citizens is troubling. At the end of the day we are all patient centered.
  2. 1
    Quote from PsychNurseWannaBe
    Also, in Wisconsin the term nurse by law means only a registered nurse and nursing means professional nursing (services provided by an RN)
    Careful---you'll get jumped on for sharing THAT!!! Ask me how I know....
    ashleyisawesome likes this.
  3. 0
    I think the reason BON's do not go after MA's referring themselves as nurses is because MA's are certified, licensed or whatever (depending on the state) by the Medical Board, not nursing, so they do not have any say in the matter. I know 2 offices that have a phone system that say "if you want to speak to a nurse..." and they do not employ RN's. I have heard MA's giving medical advice because " that's what the doctor always orders", so they believe they know what to do. I think the doctors who allow this in their offices should be reported to the medical board, however, the medical board (after I reported a doc), allow the doctor to decided what their MA can and cannot do.

    So, why did MA's become so popular - NA's do the same "tasks", but the doctors wanted to control them, and they can't control NA's? Just wondering.
  4. 0
    Na's and Ma's aren't the same. Nursing assistants do bedside care, a lot aren't able to draw blood, give injections, remove stitches, x-rays, EKG's etc. As a NCMA and a CNA, I prefer being a NCMA because I love working in an ambulatory care facility than long term care etc. But being both a MA and CNA I think Iam more rounded. Alot of people in my nursing classes don't have experience or are one or the other. With having sufficient knowledge on bedside care and clinical task Iam able to focus more on book work than not worrying if I'm doing the skills right (as of now :-)). I'm hoping it will make a better nurse when I'm done with school next year. HTH
  5. 3
    Quote from ashlie2144
    Na's and Ma's aren't the same. Nursing assistants do bedside care, a lot aren't able to draw blood, give injections, remove stitches, x-rays, EKG's etc. As a NCMA and a CNA, I prefer being a NCMA because I love working in an ambulatory care facility than long term care etc. But being both a MA and CNA I think Iam more rounded. Alot of people in my nursing classes don't have experience or are one or the other. With having sufficient knowledge on bedside care and clinical task Iam able to focus more on book work than not worrying if I'm doing the skills right (as of now :-)). I'm hoping it will make a better nurse when I'm done with school next year. HTH
    Please tell me you really didn't just say that. And you only have one more year?
  6. 0
    Quote from ColleenRN2B
    Careful---you'll get jumped on for sharing THAT!!! Ask me how I know....
    I'm not a stickler on that portion of the statues. I don't care if an LPN says she is a nurse, because really, she is, the key difference is practical vs professional. I have no problem sharing the sandbox.
  7. 1
    Quote from ashlie2144
    Medical Assistants DO have a scope of practice, I'm not sure where you are looking at, but if you look on the Govt. website...http://www.bls.gov/oco/ocos164.htm it says what medical assistants can do.
    That is not a statue or law but merely a job description of what MAs can do but it is broad based. You should not rely on that for what you can and can not do as the state determines this.

    For example... this tells you what you can specifically do, however, if you move states, then you would have to check with that state.
    FocusRN likes this.
  8. 1
    Having CNA and MA experience will definitely compliment your skills and learning but both are roles that are supervised by someone who is licensed. Neither role can assess. That will be a huge transition for you, as well as, more advanced skills that are invasive as you move forward in your nursing education. Good Luck!!
    FocusRN likes this.
  9. 2
    Quote from luvazsun
    I think the reason BON's do not go after MA's referring themselves as nurses is because MA's are certified, licensed or whatever (depending on the state) by the Medical Board, not nursing, so they do not have any say in the matter.
    It depends on the state. For example, in WI anyone who says they are a nurse and are not can be penalized with a fine or jail time. I don't know if they go in front of the BON or if the BON refers it to another agency to do the prosecuting.
    FocusRN and BuckyBadgerRN like this.
  10. 2
    When I worked in home care and hospice, I routinely had MAs say they were "the nurse" when I would call a doctor's office to speak to a nurse about a patient. It got to the point that I had to start saying, "Are you an RN or an LPN?" I knew they were lying when they started stammering. A few I busted to the doc, depending on how irritated I was. I'm sure nothing was done, but at least I let it be known there were staff there who were lying.
    FocusRN and Lauren the RN like this.


Top