advice from nurses for a new physician - page 2

A very good family friend has been accepted into medical school (osteopathic) and there is going to be a party for him. :hatparty: As a gift I would like to give him a poster or small book of... Read More

  1. by   fab4fan
    If the experienced ICU nurse calls you, a new R-1 "doctor," you've probably either screwed up somehow or are about to do so. Stop and think before proceeding with whatever dumbass thing you were about to do. ("No, DOCTOR. We do not push KCl. We especially do not push it through a 22 gauge in the right hand. We especially do not push it if the creatnine is 2.2 and the K+ is 3.8 and the patient is not having any symptoms of hypokalemia. I don't care what the tall, thin, blonde 20-something nurse standing over there told you. She's a new grad and she's still on orientation. As her preceptor, I'm telling you that you really do NOT want to do this.")
    This was laugh out loud funny!
  2. by   purplemania
    Quote from gwenith
    desiderata of health care

    go placidly amid the noise and the haste, and remember what peace there may be in keeping your mouth shut. as far as possible without surrender be on good terms with all persons even the cleaners and the receptionists. speak your truth quietly and clearly; and listen to others, even to the nurses and patients for, they too have their story. avoid loud and aggressive persons, they are known as consultants.


    if you compare yourself with others, you may become vain or bitter; for always there will be greater and lesser persons than yourself and they are known as nurses and administrators respectively. enjoy your achievements as well as your plans for the first may feel all too few while the last my never see fruition. keep interested in your own career, however humble; it is a real possession in the changing fortunes of time when all too many have lost theirs.


    exercise caution in your business affairs, for the world is full of trickery especially the internet. but let not this blind you to what virtue there is; many persons strive for high ideals, and everywhere life is full of heroism. be yourself. especially do not feign affection and particularly in the childrens ward for verily they will catch you out. neither be cynical about love; for in the face of all aridity and disenchantment it is as perennial as the grass. take kindly the counsel of the years, gracefully surrendering the things of youth but be careful of the aggressive granny with her walking stick.


    nurture strength of spirit to shield you in sudden misfortune. but do not distress yourself with dark imaginings - just because you are working in oncology does not mean you have cancer. many fears are born of fatigue and loneliness and believe us your residency will be filled with both. beyond a wholesome discipline, be gentle with yourself.

    you are a child of the health care system, no less than the nurses and the receptionists; you have a right to be here. and whether or not it is clear to you, no doubt the human condition is unfolding as it should.


    therefore, be at peace with god, whatever you conceive him to be. and whatever your labors and aspirations in the noisy confusion of life, keep peace in your soul. with all its sham, drudgery and broken dreams; it is still a beautiful world. be cheerful.


    strive to be happy.
    did you write this? may i use it? janeen (purplemania)
  3. by   Jay-Jay
    Gwenith, that was BEAUTIFUL! Where did you get it??
  4. by   pinkplumeria
    These are wonderful! Thanks! and keep 'em coming!

    I love the "Desiderata for Health Care" It's fantastic...
  5. by   kmruddrn
    A doctor is only as good as his nurse!!!


    Remember to always remain approachable.
  6. by   galenight
    I second the motion for legible writing!

    My piece of advice? Remember that you are HUMAN, not god or god-like. You can and will make mistakes as we all do. Be humble each day... that will help you avoid many many mistakes. Also make an effort to learn something new each day, whether it's a new word to play on scrabble (those darn q's qat is a good one), the name of that funky green/blue/yellow color or a new procedure.. it doesn't really matter. Learning keeps the mind sharp and open.;
  7. by   Nurse GOODNIGHT
    A third on being approachable in the middle of the night and legible handwriting. Explain your logic to your patients nurse. We want to know (and I might add, capable of understanding). Do not say, "I'm busy getting my golf bag ready", and hang up after stating, "Give an aspirin" to a probable stroke pt. (scary, but true.)
  8. by   BRANDY LPN
    Quote from Nurse GOODNIGHT
    A third on being approachable in the middle of the night and legible handwriting. Explain your logic to your patients nurse. We want to know (and I might add, capable of understanding). Do not say, "I'm busy getting my golf bag ready", and hang up after stating, "Give an aspirin" to a probable stroke pt. (scary, but true.)
    I would like to add when you are explaining your logic to your pt's nurse, do not speak to him/her like he/she is a child, also do not pose your explanation as a pop quiz of sorts (actually had a doc do this to me, as in "why do we give mag?", then tried to say he was just trying to educate me when I got a little snippy with him about it) because the nurses have been out of school at least long enough to get their licenses and do not have time for games, just explain why you want what you want, if they ask, in a respectful manner.
  9. by   smk1
    this advice is not from a nurse but i thought it applicable anyway... do not approach and ask questions of the cna/pct etc... about patient treatments and nursing care. Please find the actual nurse to discuss things with rather than expecting UAP's to deliver your info secondhand. Also do not refer to uaps as "nurses" we are not, it is illegal and it puts us in an awkward position with patients when they ask us for something that only a nurse can do. (some patients will actually think we are lying to avoid work when we tell them we aren't actually nurses.)
  10. by   smk1
    oh and as a mom to a sick newborn baby just have to say also.... don't tell the parents everything is "fine" then close the curtain and say something completely different to the nurse as though the curtain has suddenly sound proofed that half of the room.

close