Adn's Who Don't Care - page 5

hello all, i would like to know if there are any adn's out there who have no desire to get there bsn's. not because of laziness or not wanting knowledge or anything else negative, but just don't... Read More

  1. by   pagandeva2000
    Quote from nursing4me23
    hello all,

    i would like to know if there are any adn's out there who have no desire to get there bsn's. not because of laziness or not wanting knowledge or anything else negative, but just don't want to or feel its necessary because they don't want to be an admin or charge anything. or maybe you have other reasons. i feel there is so much pressure...rn to bsn..rn to bsn. geez adn's are just as effective or maybe sometimes more than a bsn. sure they get paid a little more but over 12 months the extra dollars don't seem worth it.

    so...am i alone in thinking this.

    i don't mean to offend the bsn's or anyone else. just curious.
    well, i am an lpn that has no intention of becoming an rn, so, i guess that i can understand their thoughts. i have wanted to be a nurse for many years, but put it on the back burner because life takes it's own turns. i work in a hospital that offered to pay our salaries while we were on full time leave to become lpns and rns. immediately, i opted for lpn and administration looked at me like i grew two heads in front of their very eyes. i had been on many committees at my job and knew that i would get a seat in this program, and people felt that since i would not be working at all, why not 'go all the way' and get the rn?

    i made that decision because i knew that while i wanted to be a nurse, that i did not want all of the responsibility that an rn would have. i can see doing it occasionally, if it were necessary, but i didn't want it on a regular basis. i am not interested in critical care, emergency care, unstable patients, etc.... and i am not interested in ever becoming a charge nurse, head nurse or administrator. while i do know that some institutions such as long term care may require this of their lpns, i knew that i don't want to do it, because (in my eye), no matter how strict or fair a person in charge can be, you cannot make anyone do anything they clearly don't want to do. my reasoning may be silly for others, but these reasons alone made me say that i would never even consider being an rn. i do feel that there is so much pressure in those titles and for me, it is not worth the money, so, i rejected it and am happy i didn't. now, i am back at work, as an lpn, and there are some managers that truly cannot comprehend why i am not interested. i get to go home on time, am not as frustrated (although any level of nursing is hard) and am not as tired as they are. i work like a demon while i am there, but, when i leave (on time, no less), i am gone like the wind.
  2. by   ericalynn
    You know at this point in my school career I am not sure if I want to get by BSN. I am 28 and I will graduate with my ADN in June 2007 and honestly I just want to go out there, get a job, and begin making a family at some point. I really have no interest in management or administration so I am not sure if I will ever go back. Please don't let anybody pressure you into anything, do what is right for you. There is no time limit on doing a RN to BSN program so if you change your mind in 10 years you can certainly go back. Best of luck!
  3. by   justmanda
    Quote from casualjim
    I'm a student working on my ASN. I have no real desire to get a BSN. This is a second career for me. I've been the boss, checked that box. I'm over it. Right now I'm looking forward to a few shifts a week in an ER and the rest on the beach.
    aloha
    Jim
    I think the nursing profession is the only field in which a promotion means less money. The director of our unit makes only about 60,000/year. The nursing supervisor doesn't make much more than that. I'm an ADN and made 90,000 last year. Granted, that is with some overtime mixed in, but the salaried administrative nurses get paid the same regardless of the overtime they put in. Less money....more headache. I'll stick with my little 2year degree.
  4. by   mamason
    Quote from justmanda
    I think the nursing profession is the only field in which a promotion means less money. The director of our unit makes only about 60,000/year. The nursing supervisor doesn't make much more than that. I'm an ADN and made 90,000 last year. Granted, that is with some overtime mixed in, but the salaried administrative nurses get paid the same regardless of the overtime they put in. Less money....more headache. I'll stick with my little 2year degree.
    WOW!!!! $90,000.00 a year? Where do you work and do they have any openings? The average nurse around here makes $35,000.00 to $60,000.00 a year. I'm jealous!!!!!
  5. by   pagandeva2000
    Quote from justmanda
    I think the nursing profession is the only field in which a promotion means less money. The director of our unit makes only about 60,000/year. The nursing supervisor doesn't make much more than that. I'm an ADN and made 90,000 last year. Granted, that is with some overtime mixed in, but the salaried administrative nurses get paid the same regardless of the overtime they put in. Less money....more headache. I'll stick with my little 2year degree.
    I find that the higher you move up, the more political it becomes, and that turns my stomach. How can that be that a person with more responsibility make even less money?? I'd be pissed off!
  6. by   Tweety
    Most of the time administration/management have to work 5 8-hour shifts (which sometimes extends longer and they get a salary no matter how many hours they work), and they do make more per hour than the people they supervise.

    However, the people they supervise have the option of working 12-hour shifts, which makes it easy to add some overtime in there and up their salary past their manager. Plus sometimes there's incentive bonuses. We used to get "critical staffing pay" which for night shift was time and a half plus $15/hr. So me working one extra 12 hour shift a week put me at a salary above what my boss was making.

    For some of us, getting away from bedside nursing and advancing our degree isn't about the money. I'm maxed out salary wise at my employer. So unless they raise the max, when I get my BSN I won't make a penny more. But it's not about the money for me. I understand that I'm likely not to make much more money, or even a pay cut if eventually I take a "BSN preferred position", which for me will definately not be an administrative/supervision one.

    Sorry to highjack the thread. I understand this thread is for those who choose to remain BSNs. For me the choice weather to stay or advance my degree wasn't about the money. And maybe for the manager who watches her/his staff make more money doing overtime, it isn't about the money either. Back to your regularly scheduled thread.
    Last edit by Tweety on Oct 8, '06
  7. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    I find that the higher you move up, the more political it becomes, and that turns my stomach.
    Have to agree with this. It may not be like that everywhere, but even the slimmest possibility of it is the reason why i have zero desire to be in administration, supervisory, etc. I like the fact that when i go home i am 100% HOME, and work isn't calling me at 3 am about anything.
  8. by   Tweety
    Quote from Marie_LPN
    Have to agree with this. It may not be like that everywhere, but even the slimmest possibility of it is the reason why i have zero desire to be in administration, supervisory, etc. I like the fact that when i go home i am 100% HOME, and work isn't calling me at 3 am about anything.

    Amen. There's not enough money or prestige that would make me carry a beeper and be oncall 24/7 like my manager and the directors. Nope!
  9. by   pagandeva2000
    Quote from Tweety
    Amen. There's not enough money or prestige that would make me carry a beeper and be oncall 24/7 like my manager and the directors. Nope!
    I would have crushed my beeper the moment they bugged me during my private time. I couldn't be bothered, either!
  10. by   CapeCodMermaid
    Quote from mjlrn97
    FWIW, my career is living proof that you don't have to have a BSN to be in management. I've been a charge nurse, resident care manager, ADON, and now DON, all without benefit of the "extra" years of schooling. I plan to stay with my current job for as long as they'll have me, so there's no compelling reason to go to the expense of obtaining a BSN; but if I were ever to go back for more education, I'd go straight for a master's so I could teach nursing.
    There is such a shortage of instructors for nursing schools in Massachusetts that the board decided to 'relax the rules' for teaching. Now if you have a BSN and a master's prepared nurse is your mentor, you can teach in an associate's program.
  11. by   twotrees2
    Quote from nursing4me23
    hello all,

    i would like to know if there are any adn's out there who have no desire to get there bsn's. not because of laziness or not wanting knowledge or anything else negative, but just don't want to or feel its necessary because they don't want to be an admin or charge anything. or maybe you have other reasons. i feel there is so much pressure...rn to bsn..rn to bsn. geez adn's are just as effective or maybe sometimes more than a bsn. sure they get paid a little more but over 12 months the extra dollars don't seem worth it.

    so...am i alone in thinking this.

    i don't mean to offend the bsn's or anyone else. just curious.

    glad i actually looked - the title was misleading lol. of course we care but i dont want to get anything higher as i am happy where i am - higher degree would mean more responsibilty management wise and i just dont wanna go there. it would take time away from my residents even more than it is now. i have no desire to work administratively so there really is no reason to get a bsn - and not to ofeend anyone - but from the nurses i know around here the extra they get for a bsn isnt that much so it isnt worth it.
  12. by   twotrees2
    Quote from HeartsOpenWide
    I am getting my BSN, but please do not shut me out. I just want to say that I am impressed with every ones replays. Every ones honest and not having to say thatthey are not going back because they can not afford it or yada yada ya...you all know why you do not want to go back and state in firmly, all sounding satisfied about their decisions. Its just moving thats all. Not enough to change my mind about mine, but enough to want the same enthusiasm for what I am doing. Thanks

    if i could afford it i WOULD go back to school but for psycology or labtech - i was encouraged by both my psyc and science instructors to quit nursing and change to "thier " job of choice for me. i enjoy where i am but would love having another or even both to fall back on or to do something different. think psyc would be my first choice
  13. by   JessicRN
    lets see we get $5 extra a week for a BSN and $10/week for a MSN. yep all our nurses are racing to get thier degrees NOTTTT I got mine only because in Ottawa Canada at the time I could not get a job without a degree. Here in the boston city hospitals it is like that now.

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