A step towards "universal health care" run by the government? - page 4

search results - thomas (library of congress):: the text of the bill has not been published yet, but this looks like one more step towards universal health care. what do you think?... Read More

  1. by   blueyesue
    Quote from fiestynurse
    Or, we could commit a crime and go to jail. The incarcerated are the only US citizens with a constitutional right to health care through the 8th amendment. Many people with life threatening illnesses have purposely committed crimes, so they can go to jail for full health care coverage. That is fact! Is that the America you want to live in?
    First off, until we get to heaven, we will NEVER live in an ideal or perfect place. We will always have crime, stupidity, evil etc. Currently we are living in the easiest, cushiest time in history. Mankind has never lived in such luxury, and we have the highest chances of survival. We citizens can make the healthcare system work even better without relying on the government. If you don't like the way something works, then your freedom allows you to be a force for change. :spin:
  2. by   pickledpepperRN
    I think we citizens are the government.
  3. by   VivaLasViejas
    I cannot, for the life of me, understand the objections to "universal" health care. What could possibly be wrong with having basic health care for EVERYONE?? The use of ERs for non-emergent conditions would virtually cease; people could see their doctors BEFORE they become so ill that expensive treatments and surgeries are necessary; and there would be no 'uninsured' patients whose care costs all of us so dearly.

    Best of all, getting the multi-billion-dollar insurance industry OUT of the picture would eliminate enormous amounts of overhead........do you have any idea what their CEOs earn in a year, that could instead go toward actual health care? And what healthcare professional wouldn't like to see the reams of paperwork and the utter confusion of our patchwork 'system' reduced or eliminated entirely?

    Finding the cash for universal healthcare is relatively easy: All the money that government, business, and private individuals now pay to health insurance companies could instead go into a larger pool of funds that would give every American citizen access to basic health services. Yes, it does amount to rationing, but what could be worse than the rationing we already have in this country by denying millions of people medical care because of health problems and/or lack of money? And I would not oppose allowing those with the resources to pay for additional services to do so on a fee-for-service basis; only the most necessary services, such as physical exams, immunizations, maternity care, medications and surgeries would be covered. (If you want Viagra or Botox, you're on your own.)

    I would also advocate for health services to be administered at the state, rather than federal level, by entities made up of healthcare professionals, financial planners, and educated laypersons. All 50 states would be required by the federal government to have a universal health system, but they would manage it according to the specific needs of their populations; for example, the health needs of rural Alaskans differ considerably from those of urban New Yorkers. Also, the emphasis should be on preventive care and education, which would save billions of dollars over the next several generations as serious illnesses related to obesity, smoking, STIs and other major health concerns would be reduced.

    That's my take on things, anyway.........There is absolutely no excuse for a supposedly 'moral' nation such as ours not to have basic health care for all its citizens. We are the world's only remaining superpower, yet some 40 million American men, women, and children lack access to medical care. And please don't give me that old argument about "socialized medicine".........this is nothing more than the fear of certain political factions that someone, somewhere, might receive a service for which they didn't have to pay through the nose.

    Universal health care is not socialized medicine---it's CIVILIZED medicine.

    And that's all I have to say about THAT.
  4. by   Fuzzy
    Personally, I think that if we took the government, lawyers, insurance companies, and the big drug ads out of healthcare, it would be more affordable and available to everyone. Not to mention there would be alot less paperwork and hassle.

    Fuzzy, who cannot get insurance or affordable healthcare because she choses to be a taxpayer and not a taxtaker.
  5. by   JeanettePNP
    Quote from EJM
    First off, until we get to heaven, we will NEVER live in an ideal or perfect place. We will always have crime, stupidity, evil etc. Currently we are living in the easiest, cushiest time in history. Mankind has never lived in such luxury, and we have the highest chances of survival. We citizens can make the healthcare system work even better without relying on the government. If you don't like the way something works, then your freedom allows you to be a force for change. :spin:
    It's all very well and good to be the one living in luxury but when you're the one who can't afford to have your broken ankle set and still eat 3 squares for the next 6 months, things don't look all that cushy.
  6. by   JeanettePNP
    To mjlrn: You said it all.

    Why is there no outcry about socialized education, socialized libraries, socialized highways, socialized mail delivery, socialized fire and police departments, etc.? When it comes to a basic service that everyone needs and benefits from, the government can provide that service more efficiently than the private market can.
  7. by   SillyLilly
    Quote from ChayaN
    It's all very well and good to be the one living in luxury but when you're the one who can't afford to have your broken ankle set and still eat 3 squares for the next 6 months, things don't look all that cushy.
    My father had always been against universal health care. That is until I broke my ankle and racked up a 40,000+ medical bill. I was had just graduated nursing school so had no insurance/job yet. I was already kicked out of my parent's insurance. I did not qualify for IL medicaid bc I did not have children.

    After that, my father has been *somewhat* more open minded about universal health care.

    I think that those who have had insurance their whole lives, have not lost their jobs, or have been critically ill, or basically have never experienced the terrors of having no health care, can more easily say they are against universal health care.

    But once you are in that situation you may become more sympathetic to the millions out there who do not have adequate or any health care coverage.
  8. by   blueyesue
    Quote from ChayaN
    To mjlrn: You said it all.

    Why is there no outcry about socialized education, socialized libraries, socialized highways, socialized mail delivery, socialized fire and police departments, etc.? When it comes to a basic service that everyone needs and benefits from, the government can provide that service more efficiently than the private market can.
    There is plenty of outcry against socialized education. The homeschooling and private school parents believe that they can provide a better education for their child with no costs to the taxpayer, and research proves they are right. They also have private libraries. As for the highways and police, that is part of the governments job description.
  9. by   pickledpepperRN
    What do you think of this bill?
    Search Results - THOMAS (Library of Congress)

    It includes aNATIONAL BOARD OF UNIVERSAL QUALITY AND ACCESS:
    Search Results - THOMAS (Library of Congress)
  10. by   Multicollinearity
    Quote from SillyLilly
    My father had always been against universal health care. That is until I broke my ankle and racked up a 40,000+ medical bill. I was had just graduated nursing school so had no insurance/job yet. I was already kicked out of my parent's insurance. I did not qualify for IL medicaid bc I did not have children.

    After that, my father has been *somewhat* more open minded about universal health care.

    I think that those who have had insurance their whole lives, have not lost their jobs, or have been critically ill, or basically have never experienced the terrors of having no health care, can more easily say they are against universal health care.

    But once you are in that situation you may become more sympathetic to the millions out there who do not have adequate or any health care coverage.
    So true. I have a friend who has always ranted against government...pull yourself up by your bootstraps, etc. Then he was laid off from his job. He was offered COBRA coverage for his family, but it was $1400 per month. That figure is not unusual BTW. He couldn't afford the COBRA coverage. He tried to get an individual policy on his own but couldn't qualify because his wife was on antidepressants, kids have asthma, etc. Two months after being laid off and without coverage, his wife developed a MRSA infection and went into the hospital. 40k later in medical bills, suddenly he doesn't rant about how bad government is and pulling yourself up by your own bootstraps. He told me recently that he still listens to Rush Limbaugh but he can't listen to Rush when he starts ranting about "socialized medicine." I don't think anyone really understands the issue until it's affected you or a loved one in a personal way.
  11. by   pickledpepperRN
    Quote from mjlrn97
    I cannot, for the life of me, understand the objections to "universal" health care. What could possibly be wrong with having basic health care for EVERYONE?? The use of ERs for non-emergent conditions would virtually cease; people could see their doctors BEFORE they become so ill that expensive treatments and surgeries are necessary; and there would be no 'uninsured' patients whose care costs all of us so dearly.

    Best of all, getting the multi-billion-dollar insurance industry OUT of the picture would eliminate enormous amounts of overhead........do you have any idea what their CEOs earn in a year, that could instead go toward actual health care? And what healthcare professional wouldn't like to see the reams of paperwork and the utter confusion of our patchwork 'system' reduced or eliminated entirely?

    Finding the cash for universal healthcare is relatively easy: All the money that government, business, and private individuals now pay to health insurance companies could instead go into a larger pool of funds that would give every American citizen access to basic health services. Yes, it does amount to rationing, but what could be worse than the rationing we already have in this country by denying millions of people medical care because of health problems and/or lack of money? And I would not oppose allowing those with the resources to pay for additional services to do so on a fee-for-service basis; only the most necessary services, such as physical exams, immunizations, maternity care, medications and surgeries would be covered. (If you want Viagra or Botox, you're on your own.)

    I would also advocate for health services to be administered at the state, rather than federal level, by entities made up of healthcare professionals, financial planners, and educated laypersons. All 50 states would be required by the federal government to have a universal health system, but they would manage it according to the specific needs of their populations; for example, the health needs of rural Alaskans differ considerably from those of urban New Yorkers. Also, the emphasis should be on preventive care and education, which would save billions of dollars over the next several generations as serious illnesses related to obesity, smoking, STIs and other major health concerns would be reduced.

    That's my take on things, anyway.........There is absolutely no excuse for a supposedly 'moral' nation such as ours not to have basic health care for all its citizens. We are the world's only remaining superpower, yet some 40 million American men, women, and children lack access to medical care. And please don't give me that old argument about "socialized medicine".........this is nothing more than the fear of certain political factions that someone, somewhere, might receive a service for which they didn't have to pay through the nose.

    Universal health care is not socialized medicine---it's CIVILIZED medicine.

    And that's all I have to say about THAT.
    Do we want to promote the general welfare?
    To be a civil society?

    I do.
  12. by   PANurseRN1
    Quote from Asklepios
    Why don't they just call it what it is? Universal is just a nice way to say "socialist" healthcare. I didn't realize we were now living in Russia. If you want to see what a bad idea socialist healthcare is, go look at Canada's system. People waiting months and months for urgent surgeries. Poor quality doctors, etc.

    Tha bottom line is - why should people who earn a paycheck have to pay for healthcare for the people who don't?

    Not only is that ridiculous and untrue, it's a slap in the face to our many fine Canadian members here.

    Moderator, please...
  13. by   blueyesue
    Quote from SillyLilly

    I think that those who have had insurance their whole lives, have not lost their jobs, or have been critically ill, or basically have never experienced the terrors of having no health care, can more easily say they are against universal health care.

    But once you are in that situation you may become more sympathetic to the millions out there who do not have adequate or any health care coverage.
    I used to be homeless. As an adult I only have had insurance for a few years because my husband works at a factory. I know what it is like to be without, I know what it is like to rely on the government, and I know what it is like to have health insurance.

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