"I don't want to do bed side nursing"...SAY WHAT! - page 13

had a couple different nursing students say: "well, i'm going to school so i don't have to do bed side nursing". one even told me she want to work in plastic surg. office, not at the bed side. ... Read More

  1. by   esthegirl23
    Quote from carolmaccas66
    In Aust you won't get a position anywhere as a nurse unless you have at least 12 months of critical care/med/surg experience. It is not a matter of being judgemental, it is the reality of life sometimes that you have to confront.
    I think at times some people who go into nursing have this wonderful, dreamy ideal that they will do as little as is required as possible to get their degree/diploma (whatever it is in the US), then float into a wonderfully quiet doctor's office, where you see smiling children all day and pleasant adults, where you give a few vaccines, tap some info into the computer, no-one will ever be angry again, you will not have to manage your time, your feet wil never hurt, you always go home on time and you will be eternally young and life will be just dandy!
    I think some new people need to grow up a bit, and look at the quite often harsh reality of life. Bedside nursing is not all stress, it can be pleasant depending upon where you work and what area of nursing you get into. But as the soldiers say, you got to go into the trenches first to get higher up later on.
    Where's that tough apple-pie American spirit we're always hearing about on the news gone to?

    I have researched plastic surgical nursing, and what it takes to become board certified as such. I do agree with you that "at least 12 months" is absolutely necessary. After graduating, I hope to work at least two years as a perioperative nurse in a hospital setting. Currently, my goal is to achieve that first, then work in a private practice after. However, I am in my first year of school. Who knows, what changes the next three years will bring to my current plan for the future.
  2. by   NAURN
    I work in an ICU where RNs are the only ones back there.... no techs, no secretary... we answer phones, feed pts, bath them, clean their non stopping stools when tube feeds are started, wash their wounds, suction their lungs, catch vomit... and manage to still eat our lunch at the nurses station and not even think twice about it!

    Im only 27 but still am kinda old school... I did my year of med/surg... paid my dues and went to ICU... although its not anymore glamorous it was kind of a ladder climb for me. But my year on med/surg was essential for me... I became the nurse I am that first year, how I did my assessments, how I planned my day, etc...

    I still think it important for a Registered Nurse to be able to do the functions of an RN... superb assessment skills, med knowledge, etc...and only time and experience gets you there. If plastic surgery is what she wants, fine, but I would not expect her to be very marketable to a hospital if she decides she doesn't like it. She may be treated like a new grad. Or who knows, maybe she will be a plastic surgeon herself
  3. by   bustthewave
    So I'm just now going to school to be a nurse. My long term plan is CRNA (it'll unfortunately be after they force the doctorate I think haha). I think the pace and the crazyness of the ICU is a perfect match for me (based on research, not experience), and think being a CRNA is a perfect match as well for similar reasons.

    What I don't understand is... is this considered bedside nursing? What constitutes bedside nursing?

    I envision in my mind, a long term care facility where the patients need constant everyday care... which sounds horrible to me. I couldn't survive in that environment, I'm male and not in the least maternal. I care about people, I care about patients, I want the best for the world and the people I deal with but... if bedside nursing is like working at a nursing home, I'm not cut out for it. Sure I could do it for a year or two to start out, but I wont start out looking for that kind of work.

    So if that's what bedside nursing is... I think this original post is a little unfair.
  4. by   cb_rn
    Quote from mom2michael

    Oh and this lovely new nurse wants to work ICU now......she thinks it will be like TV (she actually said this) where the doctors will do all the dressing changes and replaces all the tubes, lines, etc.....She'll just have to sit and look pretty while she charts and passes meds.
    Yeh, give that about 2 weeks and see if her delusions of grandeur have cleared up.
  5. by   cb_rn
    Quote from bustthewave
    So I'm just now going to school to be a nurse. My long term plan is CRNA (it'll unfortunately be after they force the doctorate I think haha). I think the pace and the crazyness of the ICU is a perfect match for me (based on research, not experience), and think being a CRNA is a perfect match as well for similar reasons.

    What I don't understand is... is this considered bedside nursing? What constitutes bedside nursing?

    I envision in my mind, a long term care facility where the patients need constant everyday care... which sounds horrible to me. I couldn't survive in that environment, I'm male and not in the least maternal. I care about people, I care about patients, I want the best for the world and the people I deal with but... if bedside nursing is like working at a nursing home, I'm not cut out for it. Sure I could do it for a year or two to start out, but I wont start out looking for that kind of work.

    So if that's what bedside nursing is... I think this original post is a little unfair.
    Bedside nursing is not just long term care. Its patient care. No matter what job you take if its hospital based involves some degree of cleaning messes, assisting with the potty, doing dressings that may not be palatable...and ICU nursing often involves no UAP so that bedpan and bed bath duty...its all yours.
  6. by   bustthewave
    Quote from cb_rn
    Bedside nursing is not just long term care. Its patient care. No matter what job you take if its hospital based involves some degree of cleaning messes, assisting with the potty, doing dressings that may not be palatable...and ICU nursing often involves no UAP so that bedpan and bed bath duty...its all yours.
    Yea, I know "code browns" will totally be up my alley :P, and I'm also confident I can suck it up. I just am not sure I can day in and day out soothe somebody who is dieing... if it's a situation of like, getting a patient up and moving, I'm more the type of person who is good at cheering them on, and supporting them. But touchy feely, emotional stuff... I.E. maternal type stuff... if that were the main part of my job, I'm not sure I could thrive doing that.
  7. by   April, RN
    Quote from bustthewave
    I just am not sure I can day in and day out soothe somebody who is dieing... if it's a situation of like, getting a patient up and moving, I'm more the type of person who is good at cheering them on, and supporting them. But touchy feely, emotional stuff... I.E. maternal type stuff... if that were the main part of my job, I'm not sure I could thrive doing that.
    Bustthewave, have you considered shadowing an ICU nurse for a day? Supporting patients and their families through death and dying is an everyday thing for ICU nurses. There's lots of emotions - fear, sadness, shock, grief, helplessness. Some patients get better, many do not. Code blues and withdrawal of life support happens often. I work at a large teaching hospital. We get the sickest of the sick. In the ICU, the focus is getting patients stabilized on ventilators, various IV medications, dialysis, and other resuscitation efforts. Once they start to get better, we wean them off all the machines and medications. At my hospital, they get transferred out of the ICU pretty quickly once they no longer require these things. Getting patients up and moving typically happens on the regular floors once the patient is stable enough to leave the ICU.

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