Age Limits (Age-ism) For Flight Nurses

  1. 0
    I am interested in becoming a flight nurse, but I am concerned that my actual or apparent age may be a hinderance to my aspirations. I am in my 40's and look it. I did spend 22 years as a US Army medic, including ten years in special operations (Green Berets), but I am a little hestitant in pursuing positions in a field that is probably populated with young and eager nurses.

    I am sure that I can pass a flight phsyical and any physical activity requirements that our local medivac companies (Life-Flight and Calstar) could dream-up. However, I would like to know from if any of you have run into problems being accepted as older flight nurses.

    Just as background, I am a "new" nurse, having returned to medicine in the last few years. I am MICN, CCRN, and NICU certified, and I was certified as a Flight Transport Medical Technican while in the Army (meaning that I proved my qualification and training allowing me to participate in over-water, long-distant transport of medically stable patients). I've participated in medivac operations in both peace- and war-time, and I've had battlefield experience. I've also been involved in rescue operations for both military and civilian personnel.

    If any of you have some words of advice, please let me know.

    Thanks
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  3. 10 Comments so far...

  4. 0
    Quote from CommandSarMaj
    I am interested in becoming a flight nurse, but I am concerned that my actual or apparent age may be a hinderance to my aspirations. I am in my 40's and look it. I did spend 22 years as a US Army medic, including ten years in special operations (Green Berets), but I am a little hestitant in pursuing positions in a field that is probably populated with young and eager nurses.

    I am sure that I can pass a flight phsyical and any physical activity requirements that our local medivac companies (Life-Flight and Calstar) could dream-up. However, I would like to know from if any of you have run into problems being accepted as older flight nurses.

    Just as background, I am a "new" nurse, having returned to medicine in the last few years. I am MICN, CCRN, and NICU certified, and I was certified as a Flight Transport Medical Technican while in the Army (meaning that I proved my qualification and training allowing me to participate in over-water, long-distant transport of medically stable patients). I've participated in medivac operations in both peace- and war-time, and I've had battlefield experience. I've also been involved in rescue operations for both military and civilian personnel.

    If any of you have some words of advice, please let me know.

    Thanks
    If I were you, I would not worry about the age issue. It seems to me that you are very well qualified with many years of experience.
  5. 0
    Depending on where you apply, I wouldn't worry. The standards for flight nurses is circling the drain due to the workplace shortage of RN's...which has splashed over to the flight nurse field. Some places are hiring flight nurses with as little as one year of questionable "critical care" experience.

    I think a conscientious program would be pleased to have a competent applicant.
  6. 0
    yeah.. what they said!!
    sounds to me like you have great experience.. don't worry about the age thing...
    we have many nurses and medics alike that are well into their 40's... WELL into them..
    Last edit by nghtfltguy on Apr 16, '07
  7. 0
    am well into my 50's and fly with air ambulance when traveling to florida every winter, love it as we fly lear jets out of the country and go everywhere so age is not a problem if the experience is there and the desire to just be a free spirit and go:roll
  8. 0
    I agree with the others. Along with your experience, you would bring a degree of maturity and sense of work ethic that would be appreciated.

    No flames, please. Just a comment on the (well-documented) generational issues that are in the workplace today.


    PS...I just looked at your profile. I think most flight programs require an RN (not LVN) license. What part of the country are you in?
    Last edit by sjt9721 on Jul 29, '07
  9. 0
    Hi! I've had dreams of being part of the prehospital flight team. Do any of you have any recommendations as to what schools I should enroll in so that I'd be eligible to go into that career pathway? Right now, I am only an EMT-1 (Basic), but I plan to continue with school so that I can achieve that goal of mine. Do you guys have any recommendations on what I can do?

    Sincerely,
    Julie
  10. 0
    Quote from JulieVan
    Hi! I've had dreams of being part of the prehospital flight team. Do any of you have any recommendations as to what schools I should enroll in so that I'd be eligible to go into that career pathway? Right now, I am only an EMT-1 (Basic), but I plan to continue with school so that I can achieve that goal of mine. Do you guys have any recommendations on what I can do?

    Sincerely,
    Julie
    A little off topic from the original thread? You should find some answers if you look through the other threads in the transport forum. First, you will need to go through paramedic or nursing school, then obtain at least 2-3 years of solid experience before considering moving into the flight environment.

    Regarding the age issue: I cannot see any problem unless a specific medical condition will prevent you from passing the physical. You will need to have a few years of solid ER/ICU experience. Personally, I think critical care is the way for a RN to go when considering a flight position. It looks like you have some credentials after your name, that does not hurt.
    Edit:

    I assume the LVN is a mistake? You need to have a RN license to take the CCRN exam.
    Last edit by GilaRRT on Jan 31, '09 : Reason: Additional Point:
  11. 0
    Like the others said, age won't be an issue in many or most places. And Special Ops medics are pretty well respected.

    I'm in my early 50s, started flying civilian in my 40s. I see quite a few folks my age out there. Most of the better programs want some sort of serious experience (despite the standards dropping in many places) and they know experience comes with time/age.

    Now, if you're like me, you'll feel those joints creaking in a few more years every time you lift a heavy patient in and climb in after them... :icon_roll
  12. 0
    dh is 56, working with a couple of flight nurses older than him. they do better than many of their younger colleagues.


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