Unethical hiring practices - page 2

Has anyone ever heard of anything like this? I am a new grad, and was recently hired in the CVICU, which claims to have a training program for new grads as well as floor nurses making the switch to critical care. The learning... Read More

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    OP, I'm so sorry to hear this. I started on the CVICU and after 7 months I was basically told I was not an "ICU nurse". This is the confirmation I needed to pursue something that will fit me. I resigned and pursued other options. Don't look at this as a failure and don't play the victim. Please know that not every new grad is gonna make it in ICU. Sometimes you really do have to go to step down or a less critical area FIRST then ICU. Unfortunately, you sacrificed so much to get this job. You always have to assume that you'll get terminated for whatever reason when starting a job. I'm not saying go around being paranoid but employers can fire you for any reason at any time. I always try to work a PRN job just to have a plan B, if something was to ever happen to my FT job. It is sickening that some places are like this but it is the truth. Just know that everything happens for a reason. A set back is a set up for a come back. You will COME back from this.
    fairyluv, joanna73, salvadordolly, and 5 others like this.

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  2. 2
    I'm curious as to why you are out of job when you said in your original post they offered you and the others a position in another unit..maybe I missed something? I'm also not sure why one would move across town for a job - how big is the town you live in?
    poppycat and Fiona59 like this.
  3. 2
    Quote from Marshall1
    I'm curious as to why you are out of job when you said in your original post they offered you and the others a position in another unit..maybe I missed something? I'm also not sure why one would move across town for a job - how big is the town you live in?
    They implied that we could work in another unit. However, there are no positions open in the other units and they can't just move us over there. So until something opens up, we're S.O.L. And once something does open up, we still have to compete with other applicants, so it's no different from walking in off the street and applying.

    As for moving across town, well, that wasn't necessary, but I was living 45 minutes away. I knew that I'd be working long overnight hours, and thought I'd be better off shaving off that commute time if possible. I'd never worked 12 hour overnights, and wanted to give myself the advantage of living closer.
    MBARNBSN and prnqday like this.
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    Next time I would wait to move. Unless you have a contract every job has a probationary period. Tough lesson to learn, best of luck. I agree that unfair to let so many people go, I bet this is not the first time.
    joanna73, Esme12, prnqday, and 1 other like this.
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    Honestly, they did you a favor. This is not an organization you want to work for or put any meaningful time into. You are just a warm body to them. A lot of hospitals feel this way. Be thankful they cut you loose early instead of after putting in time and loyalty. Let this be a lesson to all of those that say a new grad "owes" an employer a year. They cut you loose when they feel the need. Sounds to me like they knew what they were doing when they hired you. Cutting loose 50% of the new grads hired into the program seems more of a financial plan rather than something personal toward you. It is also pretty darn crappy for them to offer you another position that really IS NOT AN OFFER since there are no other positions. If you were only there a month I don't think you can collect unemployment, another reason why it is easier to let newbies go.

    Pick yourself up, dust yourself off, and start looking for something else. You will find another job, and it can't be worse than this one. Network with your classmates, keep in touch with your other "let go-ees" for support, and move on. Try to at least enjoy the summer off and enjoy all those summer holidays us nurses never get to see! You will find something else, just cast a wide net. You obviously have a good resume and interview well if you were chosen for this program. And now you have a month of experience that will help you wherever you do land.
    fairyluv, cateisgreat, anotherone, and 1 other like this.
  6. 1
    Quote from Zippitydoodah
    Thanks for the good luck. I'm just wondering why they hire new grads into these positions if they're just going to turn around and dismiss us in high proportions. I know you don't know the answer, I just wish they'd have told me at the outset that the likelihood was high of being let go.
    Going forward, should you go for a "new grad" program again, I would be very sure that the nurse educator is able to give you goal specific, timelined, interventioned and education based criteria. If it is a new grad program, there should be a policy about this. If there is a feeling that you are just sorta gonna go in there and "see how you do" this is just not feasible for a number of new grads, understandibly. It is a specialty that would require--I would think--a foundation, and I think the light bulb went off and they realized that. But at great personal cost to you and the other new grads that were let go.
    I would specifically ask for an exit interview with HR to discuss just this--what does "too green" mean, specifically? And that is a great deal of time and money on their part to set you all up to fail. Seems like a poorly run "new grad" program, and it is not something that I would bet the farm on.

    With all that being said, there's so many threads on AN that speak to being let go in a probationary period. Seems like no one has a care in the world about what sacrafices one makes to land the "job of their dreams", but unfortunetely, that is business--and in this day and age, hospitals are businesses. Which seems like such a study in opposites.

    However, what is done is done at this point. You can only go on from here. If you have to be in the area you are in for a time, I would look at as many different job opportunities as I could. I would most certainly use my time as orienting as an experience, as it was. If a number of the new grads were let go, then it is could point to a system issue as opposed to a lack of knowledge on your part--a "typical" new grad program has a lot of educational components, and you need to show competency in xyz by such and such a date type of stuff. The clinical experience I am sure is something that you can take with you.
    Best wishes, and if there is a smaller community hospital, an Urgent Care or something of that nature, I would start there.
    Last edit by jadelpn on Apr 1, '13
    anotherone likes this.
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    If it is a facility where your classmates and future grads from your school would be applying, be sure to let your former instructors know what went down there. Be sure you let everybody in your network know.

    I'm big on letting everybody know what I've found out about the facilities in my area. I feel, they can make better informed choices on where to work, and where to spend their healthcare dollar.
    joanna73, jadelpn, and anotherone like this.
  8. 2
    Yes it's unfair but it is the exact reason new graduates should not be hired into a specialty. When I graduated I worked med surg. While you might think boring it gave me opportunity to strengthen my nursing skills and assessment, learn basic medications, organizational skills, patient interaction and education. Today 30yrs later I still think it was the best learning experience and allowed me to go into critical care and management. Be patient find a place to develop yourself, take classes and then move on.
    joanna73 and GrnTea like this.
  9. 1
    Quote from lmccrn62
    Yes it's unfair but it is the exact reason new graduates should not be hired into a specialty. When I graduated I worked med surg. While you might think boring it gave me opportunity to strengthen my nursing skills and assessment, learn basic medications, organizational skills, patient interaction and education. Today 30yrs later I still think it was the best learning experience and allowed me to go into critical care and management. Be patient find a place to develop yourself, take classes and then move on.
    I went straight from graduation to L&D (after a preceptorship there). If I had been forced--and trust me, it would have taken force, like a gun to the head--to work med/surg, I would have quit nursing within 3 months. I think it is possible for some new grads to learn and do well in a specialty area. Within 3 years I was working High Risk Maternity.
    anotherone likes this.
  10. 0
    This happens all the time. i think the icus were i work over hire for this reason. those that do not make the cut (often before orientation) are often let go and usually offered a med surg or tele position in the hospital. This is not suprising at all . In my experience ( very limited) I have seen some new grada pick things up a lot faster than others and when you get compared to the all stars it doesnt work out. Or the existing staff was annoyed at all the new grads and hr and the manager finally found experienced icu nurses. any job is a big gamble . i am not anxious to do it again
    Last edit by anotherone on Apr 1, '13


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