Shift Report | allnurses

Shift Report

  1. 0 I am a first year nurse, graduated in June of 2005. I am having one heck of a time being able to give report off to the next shift without the oncoming nurse making rude comments, rolling of the eyes and what not. What the heck am I doing wrong? I spoke with my mentor and she told me that each nurse wants different things. Some only want what has happened to that patient just during your shift, others want 'everything'. Shouldn't everything be the same?

    This is a second career for me, I am 48, used to work in management and am by no means a 'dummy' but I am really getting to feel inferior as to my skills and am starting to question as to whether I really made the right decision to go into nursing.

    I am on the verge of going to our unit manager and having a talk with her it has gotten so bad. (As in my mentor getting complaints about how I give report. That's when she told me about how some want report and some don't)

    Has anyone else run into this type of problem? If so, how did you handle it?

    Thank you in advance for all your suggestions/ help.
  2. Visit  ladytopaz profile page

    About ladytopaz

    From 'Somewhere between O-hi & O'; 58 Years Old; Joined Jan '03; Posts: 62; Likes: 3.

    38 Comments so far...

  3. Visit  Daytonite profile page
    2
    This is a very common problem. The nurse with the rolling eyes is just being dramatic and nasty. What she should be doing is giving you some constructive feedback and helping you streamline your report. So much for helpful co-workers. Isn't that so sad? Next best thing would be to just ask this dumbbell for feedback. "Help me out here, won't you? What information am I not giving you that you want? What information am I giving you that you don't need?" Then brace yourself because if she's so dramatic and nasty she's probably going to blast you. You have to look beyond her behavior though and consider the salient points she does make.

    Other advice. . .don't look at her during report so you can't see her physical behavior. . .tape report if possible.
    Nola009 and pinkchris2000 like this.
  4. Visit  KatieBell profile page
    0
    Shift report used to be a nightmare for me.
    I think what improved it for me was that I actually listened to others who gave report without all the snuffling or eyerolling. I paid attention to what they put in and what they left out. After a few listens, I started "copying" them, and then noticed that everyone was more attentive to what I was saying, and it really wasn't as bad.
    Still, I gave report to an ICU nurse on a patient I picked up at 7pm and transferred at 7:30. It was a bit difficult and I felt stupid...and that was yesterday.
  5. Visit  Larry77 profile page
    0
    I too have had some bad experiences with reporting to 3rd shift (a whole different breed of peeps if you ask me). We have computer charting at the hospital I work at so I started giving report in front of a PC so when they start drilling me with questions I can just look them up.

    I have stayed over for doubles at times and it's really disturbing to hear some of the 3rd shifters picking apart the other shifts...must be nice to have all the time in the world to just go behind other nurses who are too busy to double check charting and complain about how they missed a note on something etc. grrrr

    Anyway another note some nurses just chose to be unhappy and no matter how much info you give them they still will complain especially if your the new kid on the block.
  6. Visit  bethin profile page
    0
    Quote from ladytopaz
    I am a first year nurse, graduated in June of 2005. I am having one heck of a time being able to give report off to the next shift without the oncoming nurse making rude comments, rolling of the eyes and what not. What the heck am I doing wrong? I spoke with my mentor and she told me that each nurse wants different things. Some only want what has happened to that patient just during your shift, others want 'everything'. Shouldn't everything be the same?

    This is a second career for me, I am 48, used to work in management and am by no means a 'dummy' but I am really getting to feel inferior as to my skills and am starting to question as to whether I really made the right decision to go into nursing.

    I am on the verge of going to our unit manager and having a talk with her it has gotten so bad. (As in my mentor getting complaints about how I give report. That's when she told me about how some want report and some don't)

    Has anyone else run into this type of problem? If so, how did you handle it?

    Thank you in advance for all your suggestions/ help.
    If this nurse is one of those who wants just what happened during your shift or wants everything, why can't she just ask nicely? Why can't she say, "could you please be more detailed" or "I just want to know what happened during your shift"? Maybe even before you start report ask the oncoming nurse what kind of report she wants. I think good reporting is one of those things you acquire over time.

    Good luck.
  7. Visit  rn in 3 years profile page
    0
    Why can't some people just GROW UP? You know, I am not afraid of all the gross things nurses have to endure (poop, throw-up, etc) but I am afraid of having to deal with such immaturity with co-workers!
  8. Visit  fergus51 profile page
    2
    This is a never ending problem. We joke at work about how anal some of the day shifters are about report, wanting details that couldn't possibly influence the care they give on their shift... All I can say is ask them what they want to know and grow a thick skin.
    Nola009 and allevi like this.
  9. Visit  unknown99 profile page
    1
    We had a similar problem between all the shifts. Now, we tape report and leave our report sheet in the report room. Have had no problem since. Works wonders!!!
    Nola009 likes this.
  10. Visit  pricklypear profile page
    8
    Try making out a flowsheet or checklist of everything you need to give in report, in order. This way, if you follow your checklist, you know you have covered everything - and if someone else wants intimate details, they can LOOK IT UP. I can't know everything about a patient, and I'm not spending my time looking up something for someone else (unless it's something I should have known in the first place!)

    Example (sort of how I give report)

    Complaint (Mr brown is here with CP which started while he was at work yesterday. His EKG and Tropis have been negative so far, the last tropi is at 2200. He hasn't had any more CP since admission)
    Brief Hx (He has had stents in the past, the last heart cath being 2 years ago. Hx of diabetes, takes insulin. He has HTN.)
    Assessment - abnormal only (monitor shows SR with occasional PVCs in the 70s, BP has been running 140s-150s/70s., he has +1 pedal edema, he is on 2L O2 per protocol, he gets up well with minimal help)
    Meds - new or changed ( we have started him on ntg paste every 6 hours, and he is taking all his regular home meds. We also started him on metoprolol today and stopped his lisinopril)
    IV (he has a SL to the left hand)
    Labs (His sodium was low on admission, but that was the only abn value. He has a CBC, Chem 7 and fasting lipids ordered for morning. And don't forget the tropi at 2200 He gets AC/HS accuchecks. He's been running under 200)
    Plans (It looks like the plan is to watch him overnight. If he has any more problems, or elev. tropis, they my do a stress test tomorrow.)
    Nice Things To Know (he is VERY HOH and legally blind. He also gets confused at night according to his wife)
    Other things to consider : Procedures done or pending, consults, specific problems encountered with this patient etc..

    I'm sure I left something out, but you get the picture!
    AcuteCare4Life, KellrRN, chosen09, and 5 others like this.
  11. Visit  rn/writer profile page
    0
    Quote from ladytopaz
    I am a first year nurse, graduated in June of 2005. I am having one heck of a time being able to give report off to the next shift without the oncoming nurse making rude comments, rolling of the eyes and what not. What the heck am I doing wrong? I spoke with my mentor and she told me that each nurse wants different things. Some only want what has happened to that patient just during your shift, others want 'everything'. Shouldn't everything be the same?

    This is a second career for me, I am 48, used to work in management and am by no means a 'dummy' but I am really getting to feel inferior as to my skills and am starting to question as to whether I really made the right decision to go into nursing.

    I am on the verge of going to our unit manager and having a talk with her it has gotten so bad. (As in my mentor getting complaints about how I give report. That's when she told me about how some want report and some don't)

    Has anyone else run into this type of problem? If so, how did you handle it?

    Thank you in advance for all your suggestions/ help.
    It's kind of pathetic that there are folks out there who take delight in rattling someone else's cage. It has been my experience that people who operate in this petty fashion nearly always go after those they perceive as weaker, ie. those who can't or won't call them on it.

    The next time you see eye-rolling or any other disrespectful behavior, stop and say, "Excuse me. Is there a problem?" Ask nicely and then just wait. If she has a legitmate gripe (you're giving too much information or presenting things in the wrong order), ask how she would do the report. Hear her out, tell her you will consider her suggestions, and thank her for the information. Then more on. If she says, no, there isn't any problem, continue with your report. If she does it again, repeat the process. Keep your cool and your dignity.

    If others have spoken with your mentor, find out the nature of the complaints. Common denominators merit further effort on your part to tailor your delivery. But, if the gripes are all different, it could just be a way of keeping the new kid in her place. Pricklypear had a good idea. Make yourself a checklist or work off your cheat sheet for your own shift and come up with a way to organize the information you're presenting. You may be throwing in everything but the kitchen sink but if it comes across as disorganized, it can be hard for an oncoming nurse to take in.

    Think about the reports you are given. If you ever have time, listen to other nurses report off. Come up with a head-to-toe checklist. Think also of what you would tell a doc if you had to call for problem.

    Chief complaint. Other relevant diagnoses. Allergies. Current S/S. Meds. Test results. Tests scheduled. Other info such as med holds, NPO, need for extra fluids. Activity level. Ancillary services (RT, OT, PT). Equipment
    and extras such as TEDS, CPM, walker, bedside commode, etc. V/S. Head to toe assessment by exception.

    Ask yourself what you would want to know if you were the oncoming nurse. Remember that you're recently out of school where you could get dinged for not knowing and presenting every last particle of information about a patient. You're operating under a much more streamlined standard now. In a very short time, you'll get a feel for how much to relate. In the mean time, tell yourself that the impatience of the more experienced nurses says more about them than it does about you.

    I'd advise against involving the nurse manager if you can help it. Be open to constructive criticism, but refuse to cave in on yourself.

    It might help you to know that long timers sometimes do the eye-rolling thing (most of them subconsciously, but a few intentionally) to size up the newbies and decide how much guff they'll take.

    Don't let the poor choices of others make you doubt yourself or your career choice. Sometimes it's tough being the new kid, especially if you've already been around the block a time or two. The effective message to communicate is, "I'm a new nurse, but I have lots of life experience under my belt. It's to your advantage to help me learn, but if you rather keep being disgusted, I guess I'll learn to work around you."

    I wish you success and confidence.
  12. Visit  Jerico profile page
    0
    If someone rolled their eyes at me giving report I'd say:

    "WOW! You know my teenagers had that same problem with their eyes rolling around in their head like that! The doctor told me it was a sign of an immature frontal lobe and it would go away when they became mature adults!" :chuckle
  13. Visit  SandraJean profile page
    1
    Quote from Jerico
    If someone rolled their eyes at me giving report I'd say:

    "WOW! You know my teenagers had that same problem with their eyes rolling around in their head like that! The doctor told me it was a sign of an immature frontal lobe and it would go away when they became mature adults!" :chuckle
    :chuckle So true!
    Yendis likes this.
  14. Visit  TypicalFish profile page
    0
    Quote from Daytonite
    This is a very common problem. The nurse with the rolling eyes is just being dramatic and nasty. What she should be doing is giving you some constructive feedback and helping you streamline your report. So much for helpful co-workers. Isn't that so sad? Next best thing would be to just ask this dumbbell for feedback. "Help me out here, won't you? What information am I not giving you that you want? What information am I giving you that you don't need?" Then brace yourself because if she's so dramatic and nasty she's probably going to blast you. You have to look beyond her behavior though and consider the salient points she does make.

    Other advice. . .don't look at her during report so you can't see her physical behavior. . .tape report if possible.

    That's good advice, as is listening to how other nurses give report. I use my "brain"; I take report in one color, and then I use my black ink throughout the day. That way, I know at a glance what has changed/been done throughout the day. The brain that I used starts with name, age, admit date; then it goes to chief dx; then History; then I go by systems and what happened during the day. It also helps to know if the nurse has had the pt before; we work 12's and they try and give the same nurses. That way, the nurse I got report from at 0700 is the nurse Igive reprot to at 1900.

    Don't worry about thr eye rolling nurse-really, just stop and ask her "I'm sorry, am I doing something wrong?" She's rude, and there's no excues for that. Giving shift report can be hard, but don't worry, after doing it awhile, it will become second nature, and you'll get the hang of it. You'll also get to know the other nurses; some on my unit take down everything you say, others barely pay attention to you, because they are reading your flow sheet and so forth. You'll get it-you will-I did! Best wishes.....


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