no autonomy as a nurse

  1. I feel that nurses really don't have autonomy at small hospitals, what do you thinks
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  2. 5 Comments

  3. by   traumaRUs
    Hi there and welcome. Autonomy comes with experience and the reliance on skill and knowledge to make solid clinical decisions. I felt that as a staff nurse, I had autonomy in the ER where I worked - I was autonomous at my skill level (staff nurse). Now, as an advanced practice nurse, I am far more autonomous. However, this has come through further education (grad degree and post-grad certificate) and experience (15 years).

    Autonomy is not something that you want to start with unless you have the knowledge and ability to back it up.
  4. by   MALE*RN*777
    I know what you mean and this is whether you are in a small or large facility. There is a rule/law or policy it seems for everything. Sometimes good and sometimes bad. As stated by traumaRUs you will learn with experience how far you can push the buttons with autonomy but you will need to make sure you are not compromising safety of yourself or the patients. You need to make sure that what you want to do autonomy wise is within you scope of practice and not governed by a law. Policies unless governed by law can be changed. You will learn what you do in one hospital or even on one unit is not the same as they do at others....
  5. by   K98
    I work in an SICU in a 800+ bed urban hospital w/ level one trauma. If you want autonomy, this is where you want to be.
  6. by   chip193
    The "right" to autonomy is earned...it is not given. What I can do is different than what a new grad can do - and it's because everyone knows me and knows what my thought process is behind a decision.
  7. by   VivaLasViejas
    Quote from chip193
    The "right" to autonomy is earned...it is not given. What I can do is different than what a new grad can do - and it's because everyone knows me and knows what my thought process is behind a decision.
    Well said.

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