Hired in for Night Shifts?

  1. For those of you hired in for night shift.. did you do your orientation on days or go straight to nights?
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  2. 11 Comments

  3. by   neeniebean
    the initial classes were all days, then i oriented on days for 4 weeks and then went to nights, where i oriented there for another 4 weeks. They're piloting a process now of just orienting new night hires on nights only, but i think that orienting on days gave me a much better picture and understanding of the way it all works together (it also made me appreciate nights much more! lol)
  4. by   DAMomma
    I agree, I orientated on the day shift. Everything came together. I met the social workers, docs, PT/OT, dietary, the family, the priest, pts were on and off the floor, tons of people everywhere. I did rounding with the nurse managers and case workers. Now that I am back on nights, I have a better understanding of how the whole process works. Midnights on my floor is insanely busy, but it has less people in the halls and around the desk, I am able to think better with out all of the distractions.
  5. by   RedhairedNurse
    I oriented on dayshift for 6 weeks, then went to nights. Oh, nights are so much better in my opinion, much less stress.
  6. by   BuckeyeRN07
    I was a graduate nurse when I hired on for FT nights, and new grad orientation is 12 weeks (give or take depending on the individual). My first 8 weeks were strictly day shift, then I switched to nights for the remaining 4 weeks. For my floor, I think the way orientation is structured for new grads is ideal.

    When it comes to experienced nurses being hired on our unit for nights, I think they should scale WAY back on the amount of time spent orienting on days (no more than 3 weeks, IMHO). The remaining 3-5 weeks should be devoted to nights, allowing the BTDT nurses to learn the rhythm of our floor and how best to plan their shift in light of the skeleton-crew support staff we're taken down to at 2300!
  7. by   dorselm
    I too oriented on days for about 6 weeks and then my last two weeks were nights. This week will be my third week on my own. I'm still trying to find my rhythm but I am very glad that I had a chance to see how things operate in the daytime. It's a myth that the night shift is so much more "laid back". I am running from the time I hit the floor until the time I leave. Many people do not sleep at night and even when they do, they awake with SOB, chest pains and a whole list of other needs.
  8. by   southernbelle08
    My first job: All the classes were during the day, usually 8-4. Then I worked two weeks on the floor during the day doing the 7-3 shift. Then I moved to 7p-7a.

    My current job: Classes during the day, 8-4. I worked two day shifts, 7a-7p. Then I was on nights after that.

  9. by   chicookie
    I had 6 weeks on days and I am having 6 weeks on nights. Total orientation 12 very long weeks.
  10. by   elkpark
    Every place I've ever worked nocs, the bulk of the orientation was on day shift, followed by a quick orientation on nocs.
  11. by   MBARNBSN
    i was hired to work on nights. i oriented on nights for a few months before becoming a nurse, then after becoming a nurse i oriented on days for a few months. i attended my rn residency program and worked the floors to gain exposure to day shift. now i will be moving back to nights next week (yeah me, i love nights)!:spin:

    the crew at nights is cool all over my hospital. the crew on days is ok, but the stress gets to some of the nurses. administrators are everywhere and the work load stretches everyone too thin, so to have someone blow up at you or to vent is quite common. on nights there is a lot to do but normally there is someone around to back you up! also administrators left at 5pm! therefore, the stress is less. good luck and welcome!
  12. by   carolinapooh
    Quote from neeniebean
    the initial classes were all days, then i oriented on days for 4 weeks and then went to nights, where i oriented there for another 4 weeks. They're piloting a process now of just orienting new night hires on nights only, but i think that orienting on days gave me a much better picture and understanding of the way it all works together (it also made me appreciate nights much more! lol)
    DITTO DITTO DITTO - man, I hate day shifts. Too many MDs (this is a teaching hospital) using the RN station like a Starbucks, too many family members chasing you up the hall, and too many patients gone for too many hours for too many procedures, leaving you to figure out how to rearrange their meds into some semblance of order.

    If I had to work day shift, I'd die. But I don't think someone should go straight to nights without working days first, at least for a little while. It took surviving those weeks of days to figure that out. You have to know how to fit stuff together, how a code works, who to call if X happens.

    It's funny, though - whenever I have to write a discharge note (which is rare on nights) I have to stop and think about what to include, but I could write an admit in my sleep. . .
  13. by   carolinapooh
    Quote from dorselm
    I too oriented on days for about 6 weeks and then my last two weeks were nights. This week will be my third week on my own. I'm still trying to find my rhythm but I am very glad that I had a chance to see how things operate in the daytime. It's a myth that the night shift is so much more "laid back". I am running from the time I hit the floor until the time I leave. Many people do not sleep at night and even when they do, they awake with SOB, chest pains and a whole list of other needs.
    True - but I do like not having EVERYTHING ELSE to deal with on top of that.

    Here I oriented for six weeks to days, and then three weeks on nights. And then you rotated shifts until the manager felt you had enough experience and knowledge to go to straight nights. I was allowed to swap a week of shifts with another nurse - her nights for my days - for about four months before I went to all nights.

    I felt really good about that, because I felt like it meant my manager had confidence in my ability (even if I don't sometimes!).

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