Did anyone hate nursing school? - page 8

I am in second semester and I am just sooooo tired and run down. Every week I feel like quitting. I have an hour commute and 2 small kids so thats an added difficulty. Is it normal to dislike nursing... Read More

  1. by   matokokepa
    I am also in nursing school and can sympathize....i too am struggling and doing my best to keep my head above water cheer on my fellow classmates.....and laugh thru tears when not getting enough sleep and at the 50 mark this is quite interesting...luckily kids raised and just have hubby and i surviving........kuddos to you........i think i can i think i can.......or better yet.......i KNOW I CAN I KNOW I CAN......like the mailman thru snow and rain etc etc
  2. by   dortizjr1
    I hated my first year of nursing school. I'm a career changer though and maybe it had something to do with that. I'd been a programmer analyst for 12 years and I found the terrible attitude of most of my first year instructors coupled with the unspoken rule of no men allowed really grating.

    The misandry aside, the worst part of nursing school was that there was simply no agreement between the instructors. What one would teach, another would tell you was wrong. There was absolutely no sense of conformity or consistency from instructor to instructor. The way the school I went to does it, is that they have two teams: and first year team and a second year team. The second year team was over all very good. The first year team stank.

    I recently saw a first year instructor at a local store and she said hello to me. My exact reply to her was " What in our shared history makes you think that I'd want to trade pleasantries with an a-hole like you?" I left her with that thought and she had a mystified look on her face.

    I read above another post about what it took to make it through nursing school, something about super smart or stubborn. I fall into the category of stubborn.
  3. by   eldragon
    I recently saw a first year instructor at a local store and she said hello to me. My exact reply to her was " What in our shared history makes you think that I'd want to trade pleasantries with an a-hole like you?" I left her with that thought and she had a mystified look on her face.
    I understand completely. I am 44 years old and just graduated from a nursing program. My instructors were 45 and 42 years old. The younger one, especially, was a nightmare. She made it a personal goal to flunk every student she could, and succeeded in flunking 60% of the class. She was bipolar, unpredictable and by the end of the program, everyone had experienced her personal wrath at least once. Because I am close to her age, older in fact, and consider myself to have aged well and to be a well-spoken individual and I have traveled all over the world and have a unique background coming into nursing, this particular instructor put serious effort into trying to make me look like a fool. She rarely succeeded. She did, however, make the program much more stressful than it had to be. In fact, she almost ruined it for me. I graduated with all A's and B's throughout the program and I never missed a single day, or was late coming to class, but my diligence was never noticed.

    I am a published writer, but yet all my writing assignments were graded poorly compared to students half my age who couldn't spell.

    So if I run into this particular woman, I have alot of bitter and cruel things I'd like to say to her. She tried to ruin me, but failed in her quest to do so.

    Should I forgive her? No. We aren't friends. I woudln't be her friend outside of school, because she wasn't civil to me while we were in school. And so if I do run into her again, I hope I am honest enough about my feelings toward her that I will disregard her completely. So I completely understand how you feel.
  4. by   GIRN
    Isn't it amazing that these instructors continue to teach year after year. Don't the students complaints and evaluations mean anything to the Dean? I was so excited to start nursing school but quickly learned that it wasn't going to be a typical college experience. I was so relieved when it was over. It was a very frustrating experience. I learned a lot and love my job now, but having to jump through so many hoops and put with up with poor instructors was disheartening to say the least.

    I did have some excellent instructors and work side by side with them now in the hospital. But the instructors that purposely tried to make their students lives miserable....I wouldn't even speak to if I saw them in the community. It's pretty sad that people have these bitter feelings about nursing school throughout the country.
  5. by   eldragon
    The instructor I am referring to was teaching for the first time. And she had no skills.

    Everyone complained. In writing. It was useless. They shipped her to another campus, and after one block of teaching new students, she received death threats. She didn't care, she still managed to flunk two students she didn't like. Funny how the two students she said she hated, both flunked out the fourth block when she started teaching them.


    The whole thing was so shady, it was overall a bad experience for me. I had imagined a college nursing program would be a good experience, and that people who showed up on time and studied for tests would be rewarded for such things. Not! Instead, she didn't lecture at all and refused to answer questions. She made you regret even asking them. So before long, nobody bothered. To ask her the simplest of questions was to stick your neck out, you never knew what her response would be.

    She was such a bad teacher, she once called a student at 10 pm, two days before a final and told her she had flunked the class, not to bother coming in the next day or the day after for the final.

    So, on the day of the final, the other instructor checked that students grades, and she hadn't failed! She called the student two hours before the final and told her she could still take it. The student, who had been depressed and obviously not studying for the final, didn't bother coming in.

    No reprimands for that. And it wasn't the only time that teacher miscalculated a grade and told a student they had failed. It happened to another student, too. But that student knew she had passed, and challenged the teacher, who put the student on hold and came back on and told she had, in fact, passed. (Next block...that student failed for real, yes - by the teacher in question.)

    It was awful.
  6. by   Aedana
    Quote from FNPhopeful
    I am in second semester and I am just sooooo tired and run down. Every week I feel like quitting. I have an hour commute and 2 small kids so thats an added difficulty. Is it normal to dislike nursing school so much? I know Im probably just not thinking clearly at this point being so exhausted, but please tell me it all pays off in the end!
    I personally did not "like" nursing school while I was in it. Now, I found it interesting learning about pathophysiology and interventions and I enjoyed the time I spent working with my patients, but fun...uh, no. For me, it was pretty much as you said, complete and utter exhaustion alternating with brief moments of panic and a lot of moments of feeling like you know absolutely nothing. And I remember feeling that way especially during my second semester (adult med-surg I), mostly because the excitement and happiness of making it into nursing school started to fade and my knowledge base was growing enough where I could really understand how little I knew. The first semester of med-surg is also just plain hard because there is so much to learn with absorbing all the stuff for cardiac, diabetes, etc.

    I will tell you this. After second semester, things got a lot better for me. By the time you get to the last semester (adult med-surg 2), you are so good at being a student, you usually have a system in place that clinicals are much less grueling and a lot of times, the instructors will go easier on you and treat you more as a peer (which you soon will be!) Then when you graduate, the knowledge you reached your goals and getting that first big fat paycheck makes it all worth it.

    It sounds like you need to take five and give yourself some TLC. At my school, we were taught to pamper and reward ourselves frequently (especially after doing great on a test), because if you don't care for yourself, you can't care well for others and you burn out. Everyone pampered themselves differently, from going on a nice walk outside, to buying a new pair of shoes, taking a bubble bath or sending the kids to grandma and getting an extra nap in.

    Hang in there! The look of pride when your family watches you cross the stage is worth it!
  7. by   nurse2b2010
    I keep reading on here about all the stress that NS creates. That scares me. I am trying to get into the Fall program. At this point in my life, I don't need a lot of undue stress, but I don't want to give up the option of going into nursing either. I am dealing with some personal health issues so too much added stress may not be a good thing. Any advice -- besides don't go to nursing school, which I don't want to hear (sorry don't mean to be negative! ) Thanks for your forthcoming responses.
  8. by   Aedana
    Quote from nurse2b2010
    I keep reading on here about all the stress that NS creates. That scares me. I am trying to get into the Fall program. At this point in my life, I don't need a lot of undue stress, but I don't want to give up the option of going into nursing either. I am dealing with some personal health issues so too much added stress may not be a good thing. Any advice -- besides don't go to nursing school, which I don't want to hear (sorry don't mean to be negative! ) Thanks for your forthcoming responses.
    Don't get too discouraged! NS is stressful and I haven't met anyone who has gone through it themselves and said otherwise. Like boot camp, it's kind of one of those experiences that makes it so nurses of all levels of experience and education can relate to each other. I outlined one of my strategies for surviving in the post above yours (being sure to take care of yourself). Another thing we were taught was to make friends in our nursing class because we needed each other. Nobody can really understand what you are going through like another nursing student, which is why this forum is so awesome!

    You might search for NS stress relief tips, as I wouldn't be too surprised if someone has already covered the topic before. Good luck and I hope an acceptance packet finds its way into your mailbox next summer!
  9. by   blueinplaid
    YES I abhorred it! I work with several ER techs that are in nursing school now and let me tell you, I am soooo happy that I am not going through that again! I enjoyed talking with the patients but man, the course work, the lack of sleep, the stress!! Nursing school and test anxiety and being relatively shy...those things make for tense couple of years! It has been ten years since I graduated from my BSN program, but I can remember my profs, the course work, the patho flow charts....on and on and on!
    lOne day at a time. Each day leads you one step closer to the goal. It is worth it. Course once you graduate, there is a whole other fear in that learning period, but you start getting paid for that and the learning at that point is pretty awesome.
  10. by   yellow finch
    Wow. I'm a little surprised by all the negative opinions on nursing school. While I won't lie and say that everyday was a bed of roses, I found my undergraduate experience to be challenging and rewarding on a daily basis. I didn't understand many of the concepts that are now much clearer as a practicing RN, but that didn't stop me from continuing on and keeping up with my assignments and clinicals.

    There were times when I was surprised and disappointed with the teaching methods that some of the instructors worked by. However, I pursued my studies independently and managed to get through with a 3.71 GPA (typical perfectionist nurse who didn't get perfect grades)

    Having gone through an accelerated program there was one semester where I was either in clinicals or class 5 days a week and working on the weekends. It was a stressful nightmare! The way I survived was to take it on as a challenge and not let it get me down. I had a goal and I achieved it with perseverance. Nothing was going to stop me from getting to where I was going.

    Now that I'm in a graduate program to become an FNP I see just how much harder and time-consuming it is compared to undergraduate school. The instructors are often much more harsh and demanding because they expect so much more out of you. There have been miscommunications that have affected my opinion of several of the instructors to boot. Still, I'm enjoying every minute of it and can't wait to graduate this December!

    Even when times are rough keep a positive attitude. It's not always easy yet your attitude helps make it a better overall experience. Remember that you chose to enter this field and always have the option to move onto something else if this isn't for you. My first BA was pretty much the same when it came to professors. You can't escape all the unique personalities that are drawn to teaching higher education.

    Best of luck to all of you in school! You are heading towards a most interesting part of your lives! There's so much more to come!
    Last edit by yellow finch on Jan 8, '08
  11. by   eccentricRN
    hate...oh yes i extremely disliked nursing school, is that the same as hate? i also had a son and worked parttime through school, don't miss it, but i'm thrilled i'm through, now i just have to get through nclex... so i'll let you know about the worth it part.
    my advice get a study buddy, some one you can vent to and take one day at a time, try to get things out of the way as early as you can and keep plugging, there is an end in sight and it'll be there before you know it... i know you hear that all the ime, but it's true... i wish you the best of luck!
  12. by   nurse2b2010
    Quote from yellow finch
    Wow. I'm a little surprised by all the negative opinions on nursing school. While I won't lie and say that everyday was a bed of roses, I found my undergraduate experience to be challenging and rewarding on a daily basis. I didn't understand many of the concepts that are now much clearer as a practicing RN, but that didn't stop me from continuing on and keeping up with my assignments and clinicals.

    There were times when I was surprised and disappointed with the teaching methods that some of the instructors worked by. However, I pursued my studies independently and managed to get through with a 3.71 GPA (typical perfectionist nurse who didn't get perfect grades)

    Having gone through an accelerated program there was one semester where I was either in clinicals or class 5 days a week and working on the weekends. It was a stressful nightmare! The way I survived was to take it on as a challenge and not let it get me down. I had a goal and I achieved it with perseverance. Nothing was going to stop me from getting to where I was going.

    Now that I'm in a graduate program to become an FNP I see just how much harder and time-consuming it is compared to undergraduate school. The instructors are often much more harsh and demanding because they expect so much more out of you. There have been miscommunications that have affected my opinion of several of the instructors to boot. Still, I'm enjoying every minute of it and can't wait to graduate this December!

    Even when times are rough keep a positive attitude. It's not always easy yet your attitude helps make it a better overall experience. Remember that you chose to enter this field and always have the option to move onto something else if this isn't for you. My first BA was pretty much the same when it came to professors. You can't escape all the unique personalities that are drawn to teaching higher education.

    Best of luck to all of you in school! You are heading towards a most interesting part of your lives! There's so much more to come!

    Your persevering attitude is the hallmark of your success! Congrats on becoming an RN and continuing your education in graduate school!
  13. by   yellow finch
    Quote from nurse2b2010
    Your persevering attitude is the hallmark of your success! Congrats on becoming an RN and continuing your education in graduate school!
    Well thanks. In the whole scheme of things, nursing school really wasn't the horrendous experience so many here have stated. I wanted to become a nurse, I went through the required education, and now I'm moving on.

    The same can be said about working as an RN. It took me almost 3 years and 3 jobs to find the right area for me. Now I'm almost completely satisfied with the work I do, adore my manager, and have a great team of coworkers whom I can trust.

    Never let your dissatisfaction let you down. Again, a negative attitude will only make things worse. A positive attitude will always make things better.

    Are you in nursing school right now? Is your name correct? RN in 2010?

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