BSN nurses - page 2

In recent lliterature it is stated that by 2010 all RN's coming out of school should be BSN's. Do you think this is reasonable in light of the nursing shortage?... Read More

  1. by   RN2007
    Funny thing. I actually have my B.S. in Psychology, Masters Degree in Clinical Counseling, and now plan on going into the ADN program because where I live in FL it is the only thing available to me within driving distance.

    If I had my wish, I would go straight into the Accelerated BSN Program that people with 2nd Degrees have, but there are none nearby. So, with that, I am trying to take my A&P courses now and am getting ready for the ADN RN program that I will be able to begin in 2005, - because yes, the waiting list is that long!! And in the future I think I will go into Psych Nursing, however, I think that my other Psych degrees will not be counted, because it seems that in nursing they only want you to learn the "Psych Nursing". I hate that my others degrees will not advance me any, but at least some of the Psych Nursing programs are diplomas and do not take years to complete.

    Oh, and re: the "professional debate" re: who is and who is not a professional. It is sad but true that most anyone who graduates from their programs, colleges, etc. , call themselves professionals in their own fields, therefore the word has really been used very loosely. However, most books and educational materials that discuss careers in general still refer to the old standbys as professionals such as : doctors, lawyers, architects, etc, etc. - which at one time were male dominated professions but are not any longer. And I certainly do not agree with this defininition of professionals, so please - no flaming me. But I think you all know where these rigid definitions of professionals have come from.
  2. by   angelsuzie
    What is ADN???
    I believe all nurses should have at least BSN to get better reputation and money.
  3. by   Ortho_RN
    Just to let you know.. Just because you have a BSN doesn't mean you will get more money... The difference in pay between an ADN and BSN here is 25cents/hr...

    AngelSuzie- ADN= Associate Degree Nursing... 2yr program.. Usually most end up being 3yrs counting pre-reqs..

    I have no problem with hospitals wanting BSNs, but where I live it won't benefit me unless I want to go into management... I do plan on getting my BSN, but only for personal reasons...
  4. by   sbic56
    Originally posted by angelsuzie
    What is ADN???
    I believe all nurses should have at least BSN to get better reputation and money.
    It would be nice if that were so, but this already stressed healthcare system is hardly about to pay nurses more just because they have taken the extra courses that are needed to obtain a BSN. Besides, the core nursing classes are basically the same between the ADN and BSN programs. Respect comes from your performance on the job. There are equally capable staff nurses working side by side who have $8000 ADN degrees and others who have $35,000 BSN degrees. The universities are the real winners in this whole thing. I do believe administrative nurses should have BSN degrees, though.
  5. by   Shamrock
    This could and has become a volitile discussion in the past. The
    "must be a BSN" talk has been going on for MANY years and
    personally I don't believe anything will come of it. If it does, I
    believe that all ADN and Diploma RN's would be grandfathered in to meet whatever standard is set. I've met and worked with
    many different nurses educated in all ways possible and as is
    true in any profession, all levels have the good, the bad and the
    ugly.
  6. by   pama
    In response to what is an ADN this is directly from the National Organization for Associate Degree Nursing (NOADN) website:

    Associate degree nursing (ADN) education provides a dynamic pathway for entry into registered nurse (RN) practice. It offers accessible, affordable, quality instruction to a diverse population. Initiated as a research project in response to societal needs, ADN education is continually evolving to reflect local community needs and current health care trends. ADN graduates are prepared to function in multiple health care settings, including community practice sites.

    Graduates of ADN programs possess a core of nursing knowledge common to all nursing education routes. They have continuously demonstrated their competency for safe practice through National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN) pass rates. These nurses provide a stable workforce within the community. The majority of ADN graduates are adult learners who are already established as an integral part of the community in which they live. They exhibit a commitment to lifelong learning through continuing education offerings, certification credentialing, and continued formal
    education.

    Nurses prepared at the ADN level are caring, competent, and committed health care providers who fill a vital need in local communities. Accordingly, the National Organization for Associate Degree Nursing supports ADN preparation as the entry level into registered nursing.

    Background Facts

    The development of ADN education had its inception in 1952 as the result of a research project conducted by Mildred Montag. The project sought to (1) alleviate a critical shortage of nurses by decreasing the length of the education process to two years and (2) provide a sound educational base for nursing instruction by placing the program in community/junior colleges. In 1958, the W.K. Kellogg Foundation funded the implementation of the project at seven pilot sites in four states (Haase, 1990).

    The success of this radically new approach to educating registered nurses has been phenomenal.

    Supportive data:

    # The number of ADN programs has escalated from seven in 1958 to 868 in 1994 (National League for Nursing, 1996).

    # ADN education is cost effective and accessible to a diverse population.
    * most ADN programs are located in community/junior/technical colleges
    * annual resident tuition (American Association of Community Colleges, 1997):
    o $1,820 for students in ADN programs in community colleges
    o $2,930 for students in baccalaureate programs in public higher education institutions

    Reasonable cost and proximity of ADN programs to the community enhances access for adult learners, males, married students, and minority populations.

    # ADN programs prepare the largest number of new graduates for RN licensure. In 1995, 58,749 (61%) nursing graduates out of a total of 97,052 were from ADN programs (National League for Nursing, 1996).

    # ADN programs have a high rate of success on the first attempt to pass the NCLEX-RN. National pass rates for the three types of nursing programs for 1996-97 are indicated below: (National Council of State Boards of Nursing, 1996-1997)
    * ADN--88%.
    * Diploma--90%.
    * Baccalaureate--85%.

    # Of the 2.5 million RN population in 1996, over 66% are ADN graduates (NLN, 1996).

    # According to a National League for Nursing (NLN) Report, 1994 ADN graduates functioned in a variety of settings with 22% working outside the hospital (NLN, 1996).

    # ADN graduates possess the competencies needed by registered nurses. They function as providers of care, managers of care, and members within the discipline of nursing. Graduates of ADN programs demonstrate skills in critical thinking, communication, patient teaching, delegation, and computer usage. They provide quality nursing care in a cost effective, caring manner. ADN graduates are patient-focused in the delivery of care, collaborative in their working relationships, and accountable for their decisions and actions.

    # ADN graduates are actively recruited by service providers. Employers hire ADN graduates because they are
    * confident,
    * knowledgeable,
    * skilled for RN positions.

    # ADN programs are responsive to changing health care delivery systems. Examples of curricula changes to increase community focus:
    * The Community College-Nursing Home Partnership Project funded by W.K. Kellogg was initiated to enhance the preparation of ADN graduates for work with an increasing elderly population, as well as to manage and delegate to unlicensed personnel (Sherman, 1993).

    * NLN's Vision for Nursing Education (199) promoted inclusion of of community learning experiences by all levels of nursing education. Associate degree educators rapidly identified the needs in their communities and offered learning experiences with individuals and families in community settings (Mueller, 1995).

    # ADN graduates are lifelong learners. They continue to expand knowledge and skills through
    * continuing education offerings,
    * practice,
    * credentialing,
    * formal enrollment in degree programs.

    Summary

    ADN education was developed through careful research to relieve a shortage of registered nurses. As the only nursing education program based on research, it has been highly successful. ADN graduates now account for a majority of the RN workforce. Many of these individuals would never have been able to become registered nurses without the access afforded by the community college system. Registered nurses educated in ADN programs are sought-after employees who provide quality nursing care. In many rural areas, service agencies depend almost entirely on ADN graduates to staff their facilities. Registered nurses educated in ADN programs have proved their worth and capability as health care providers. To ensure that ADN graduates continue to function effectively, ADN curricula are continually evolving based on changing health care needs within local communities. ADN programs have excelled in meeting community health care needs in the past and are exceedingly capable of meeting those needs in the future.
  7. by   sbic56
    Your response, pama, is the most complete answer to a three word question I have seen. Bravo. This thread is now complete.
  8. by   twarlik
    Lots of interesting information. Thanks!

    Originally posted by pama
    ADN programs have a high rate of success on the first attempt to pass the NCLEX-RN. National pass rates for the three types of nursing programs for 1996-97 are indicated below: (National Council of State Boards of Nursing, 1996-1997)
    * ADN--88%.
    * Diploma--90%.
    * Baccalaureate--85%.

    I checked their site and actually found some more recent statistics than what you provided above:

    (National Council of State Boards of Nursing, 2000)
    Program Type Number of Graduates NCLEX-RN Passage Rate
    Diploma - 83.4%
    Associate Degree -83.8%
    Baccalaureate Degree -83.9%
    The overall passage rate for all graduates was 83.8%.

    Looks like the gap has decreased quite a bit.
  9. by   Mkue
    Originally posted by nurs2b
    ... I do plan on getting my BSN, but only for personal reasons...
    Me too, it's totally personal and not about money or what is best for everyone, I think getting a bachelor in anything whoever has the desire and a goal is a good thing !
  10. by   sbic56
    Originally posted by mkue
    Me too, it's totally personal and not about money or what is best for everyone, I think getting a bachelor in anything whoever has the desire and a goal is a good thing !
    Yes. Yours is the best reasoning for anybody to persue something they want; keeping it personal.
  11. by   Ortho_RN
    Originally posted by mkue
    Me too, it's totally personal and not about money or what is best for everyone, I think getting a bachelor in anything whoever has the desire and a goal is a good thing !
    Yeah.. I just want the bachelors to say I actually have degree other than an Associates.. I don't want it b/c I think it would make me a better Nurse because it won't.. Its just a piece of paper..
  12. by   RN2007
    Pama and Twarlik, Thanks so much for your very interesting info!!

    I am pretty sure that after I get my ADN and start working as a RN, that I will get into an online program to complete the BSN. Like I said before, if there were schools closer to me that I could get the BSN now, I would go into that program instead of the ADN, just to get it over with, because I am approaching 40 and already have a non-nursing Bachelor Degree, and it would not take me much longer to get this than it would for the ADN. Also, since the controversy between the 2 degrees will probbably only increase in the future for whatever reason, I most likely will feel the need to go back to get the BSN to make sure I will stay qualified for a large number of positions. However, I am confident that I will get a really good education with the ADN program because I have heard a lot of good things about the school and their nursing graduates.
  13. by   twarlik
    Originally posted by RN2007
    Pama and Twarlik, Thanks so much for your very interesting info!!
    You're welcome!

    Just curious...where in Florida are you? What program are you going to enter? I'm in Tallahassee and will be starting at FSU in August.

    Todd

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