Best job for new grad?

  1. Hello, all. I may be jumping the gun on this, but I'm going to graduate in 3 months and still have no idea where I want to work. Is that really bad? I'm kind of interested in NICU but I've been told repeatedly that I wouldn't get a job there as a new grad and that if I ever wanted to get out of NICU nursing, it would be next to impossible. Does anyone have experience with Neuro Trauma ICU? Would that be an okay start for a new grad?
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  2. 11 Comments

  3. by   dah doh
    Why would anyone tell you that! Are they a reliable resource or are they trying to sabotage you? Try getting into NICU if you like it there but realize you might have to start elsewhere to get experience first and transfer in later. Also, try multiple facilities and different areas when you apply since you're not sure what you want to work. Neuro trauma ICU is completely different compared to NICU. If you want to work with kids, try peds if NICU won't take you at first. Good Luck!
  4. by   86toronado
    Where you decide you want to specialize is a very complex decision, and not one that needs to be made right at graduation time. If NICU intrigues you, by all means apply there, but as someone already told you, it may pigeonhole you down the road if you decide to try something else. The best advice I could give if you really have no idea is to work on a med/surg floor with telemetry, as that will give you a great foundation for anywhere else you want to transfer.
  5. by   hiddencatRN
    If you're willing to relocate, there are plenty of hospitals out there that hire new grads in to NICU. Specialty new grad positions will be more competitive, so you might end up in a less desired job for you, but that doesn't mean you can't or shouldn't try. Balance your desire to work in NICU with how long you're able to hold out on the job market.
  6. by   RNperdiem
    Neuro trauma is an interesting place. It would be essential to have enough of an orientation and supportive coworkers.
    This unit can also be a tragic place. Major disabling strokes, head trauma and spinal cord injures are common, and these patients and their families need lots of support.
  7. by   nurseprnRN
    Realistically? The best job is the one you get, and thank your lucky stars for it (these are not the stars in your eyes) .

    Neurotrauma is a specialty area too; it is remotely possible that somebody would hire you as a project, since you would take a lot of time to get to independent competence. New traumatic brain injuries, spinal cord injuries, intracranial bleeds-- not a game for rookies.
  8. by   not.done.yet
    Right now the bet job for a new grad is the one that actually gets offered to them. Apply to everything, especially given you aren't overly drawn to any one population. No need to limit your chance of employment by focusing on a specialty right now.
  9. by   akulahawkRN
    Quote from not.done.yet
    Right now the bet job for a new grad is the one that actually gets offered to them. Apply to everything, especially given you aren't overly drawn to any one population. No need to limit your chance of employment by focusing on a specialty right now.
    I would very much tend to agree that the best job for a new grad is the one that is actually offered. I have a ways to go before I finally graduate, but I do understand that for the best chance of a new grad to get hired anywhere, is to apply everywhere. Probably the only special thing that I will not be applying to is obstetrics. While I greatly respect to the job that obstetrics nurses do, I have discovered that obstetrics is just simply not a calling for me. That does not mean that I will not put 100% of my efforts into learning the basics of obstetrics.
  10. by   JBudd
    Akula, Notdone and Greentea hit it spot on.

    The best job is the one you can get that pays you. Specialties are not the end all and be all of nursing.

    I enjoyed medsurg for a great many years before moving on to other areas. People tend toward the attitude that it is the bargain basement of nursing, for the ones who aren't "good" or "smart" enough to be a "specialist". Absolutely not! Med surg, plain old not-fancy bedside nursing requires a heck of a lot of critical thinking, time management, balancing and handholding. Those patients need just as good nurses as any "specialty" area, some ways better because of the variety of problems any one assignemnt has on a shift.
  11. by   Ciale
    Quote from GrnTea
    it is remotely possible that somebody would hire you as a project.
    Cracking up right now. I see your point. Maybe some hiring manager will get bored and need an experiment...hahaha
  12. by   Ciale
    I did a work-study program through a hospital so they are obligated to hire me which is pretty freakin' nice because I know it is difficult for new grads to get jobs let alone the ones they were wanting. That being said, I still have to find an open position that will take me which may very well be med-surg *cringe*
  13. by   Racer15
    It's different for everyone. I was willing to take whatever job was tossed my way, but I got a position in the ED right out of school, which is what I wanted. And I'm doing very well so far. I like the fast pace, and I like the fact that everyday is different. I have a classmate that is also in the same department as myself, and she cries almost everyday when she leaves. I generally look forward to work, she dreads it. On the flip side, I would freak out working in the NICU (my hospital does hire new grads into their NICU). Good luck!

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