Advice on "setting boundaries"

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    Hi! I recently passed the NCLEX, got my license, and will start my very first job in a couple of weeks. Aside from all the other new grad concerns (time management, etc.), I know that I will have a HUGE problem setting boundaries with difficult patients and their families. During clinicals, I even had a patient tell me, after spending pretty much the whole day harassing and insulting me, that nobody was ever going to take me seriously if I didn't quit being so nice. My response: "Well, I'm not going to be rude to you."

    Anyway, I am asking for advice because I think it would be very helpful for me to already have a couple responses ready, especially at first, so I can be more confident, and don't end up getting walked on...or completely blowing up at people. I've spent a lot of time in food service, and had a pretty hard time dealing with rude people. And by hard time, I don't mean being a push over, I mean getting a really bad attitude, and occasionally exploding (luckily for me, it was almost impossible to get fired from that place). I knew this sort of behavior would be unacceptable in clinicals, and because, apparently, I have no idea how to be both firm and polite, I ended up on the opposite end of the spectrum.

    SO...what do you say to people who are giving you problems? I know there will be a lot of grin-and-bear it type stuff going on, that's not what I have issues with. It's things like patients who aren't being compliant, ripping off their O2 masks, patients and families yelling. Also, for example, one of my patients (who was super sweet...and homeless) had his girlfriend (also homeless) staying with him, which is not a problem. The problem was, she was acting like she was staying in a hotel, and kept demanding that I bring her ice cream, sodas, socks, toothpaste, crackers, anything extra she could think of. If I would tell her it was for the patients or something like that, she would get so rude and combative with me, interfering with what I was trying to do for my patient, that I decided it wasn't worth the trouble, and I would just do whatever it was. Which is when a nurse told me to grow a spine, and that I'm creating more work for other people on later shifts because now, she expects that sort of treatment. I really don't want to put my coworkers in that position (and also I want them to like me!).

    I'd love to grow a spine, I'm working on it. I don't have a huge aversion to conflict, I just don't know what to say! A lot of people chose to ignore ridiculous requests, or just keep acting like they "forgot," but I would rather address an issue, if possible. Also, another problem I seem to have, is I don't know what behaviors from a patient are considered crossing the line, and what behaviors I should accept from my patients and their families. I know that I will get better with practice, but I would really appreciate any sort of advice that could help me learn how to be firm and maintain my dignity when necessary, while staying polite and professional.

    Thanks, y'all!
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  3. 14 Comments so far...

  4. 1
    As for unreasonable requests I just smile and say " No, sorry, I can't do that" and walk away.If they are rude I say " that's not acceptable and I will come back when you are ready to ready to be polite". It takes practice.
    HMAmara likes this.
  5. 4
    Sometimes what works for people who are speaking rudely, insulting you, or otherwise speaking to you in a way that is making you feel uncomfortable is to call them on it.

    "I don't like the way you are speaking to me. I am here to help you, but I can't tolerate this behaviour. I will come back in 15 minutes, and we can try this again."

    And then come back when you said you will be back, and literally start over. "It's time for your dressing change" or "Now, what can I help you with?" If they've stopped doing what you asked them to stop, then carry on!

    It won't work for everyone, and when it does work you won't usually get an apology, but often they'll realize they need to keep their insults to themselves while you are in the room. Walking away, (more than once if need be) shows that you aren't going to tolerate their abuse. Coming back when you say you will shows you will give them a chance to behave like respectful adults.

    Patients have need of nurses, but I'm not a handmaiden and I'm not a servant. I will always help, as long as you show me basic respect. They don't need to love me or sing my praises. They can be as grumpy or gruff as they like as long as it isn't directed at me or my coworkers. I might even make it my mission to make them smile -- just don't call me names or shout in my face, and we will get along just fine.
    HMAmara, Marisette, Imsofocused, and 1 other like this.
  6. 0
    So you don't get in trouble for walking out of the room?
  7. 2
    Nope.We are nurses and we are not there to be verbally abused.You have to draw a line.
    HMAmara and BrandonLPN like this.
  8. 0
    Ok. Sorry if I'm sounding thick-headed, I just want to know what y'all think this sounds like. So if someone is being combative, and I said something like, "I know you're upset, but I can't tolerate this behavior. I'm going to let you cool down, and I'll be back in a few minutes," and then came back a little later acting like nothing happened, that would be ok, right? Or is that something that could get me in trouble?

    Ha, if you can't tell, I'm very concerned about preparing myself for conflict!
  9. 1
    I think the BEST approach is to run these scenarios and responses past your new manager- and say "What is acceptable on this unit? How would you like me to respond when these types of situations arise?"

    You did an excellent job of presenting your issue in writing, analytically and with good self-awareness - do the same verbally to your manager. If you respond in a manner he/she has already said is OK- you will always be backed up.
    MrChicagoRN likes this.
  10. 0
    Quote from SubSippi
    Ok. Sorry if I'm sounding thick-headed, I just want to know what y'all think this sounds like. So if someone is being combative, and I said something like, "I know you're upset, but I can't tolerate this behavior. I'm going to let you cool down, and I'll be back in a few minutes," and then came back a little later acting like nothing happened, that would be ok, right? Or is that something that could get me in trouble?

    Ha, if you can't tell, I'm very concerned about preparing myself for conflict!
    Physical violence is some thing different.Then you need to get someone else involved and don't forget to document, document,document in all cases of inappropriate behaviour.
  11. 0
    Thanks, that is really good advice! Especially about talking to a manager before anything happens, I think that will do a lot to alleviate my worries.
  12. 0
    Quote from SubSippi
    So you don't get in trouble for walking out of the room?
    Of course if something emergent was happening you can't just leave, but no, I don't. I am not refusing care. What I am doing is refusing to be abused and giving the patient an opportunity to start over. I will go back, I will provide care, but I won't tolerate abuse.


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