Rude nurse? - page 2

by obloom14 7,100 Views | 33 Comments

The other day I took my father to the ER because he was having severe symptoms that made me believe it was the flu. Mistakenly I thought my dad said he had chest pain as well so I wrote that down during his admission. After... Read More


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    I come here to read/learn about peoples experiences, and it's like there's always that one person throwing in their bitter opinion like it even matters.
    InsideWindow likes this.
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    I apologize if that was our ER. Its an open floor concept and sound really carries down each hall. I could easily see the "there's no chest pain" laugh of relief taking place; chest pain is like a magic word that opens up a series of doors that cannot be closed once opened - Iv's, xrays, EKG, monitoring, O2, labs (including a d-dimer, which will probably be slightly positive which would lead to a Ct-chest r/o PE) So please don't take it personally. Hope ya'll are feeling better! After sitting in the waiting room for 2.5 hours I'm sure I'd be pretty irritable too! Like someone else did mention, nurses destress of cope in weird ways. I've laughed in many a code... Not because I wasn't interested or invested what I was doing, its just how I handle the stress.
    BrnEyedGirl, corky1272RN, and KayRN1 like this.
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    Back to the original poster (OP), I'm sorry that you had a negative experience. Perhaps in the future, you can ask to speak to the charge nurse and register your concerns. After each ER visit at most hospitals, you will receive a customer service survey. You can also use this as a means for your concerns.

    Hope your Father is feeling better.
    Susie2310 likes this.
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    I think we need to be respectful of others opinions and thoughts. I think we need to remember that we can disagree respectfully and professionally. I think we need to remember that while the membership consist of nurses.....we have members that are students, students to be, CNA's, MA's, respiratory therapists, paramedics EMT's, patients, and the general public from all over the world. Allnurses while anonymous is public and can is viewed by, and can be commented on, by the general public.

    I always read a poster history of postings before I respond to most posts to know how to best respond/comment/post about any given subject. It gives me insight on how to best respond.....for example if an experienced nurses asks a question I would tailor my answer differently than I would to a first semester student.

    Allnurses promotes the idea of lively debate. This means we are free to disagree with anyone on any type of subject matter as long as your criticism is constructive and polite. We also ask for everyone to please refrain from name-calling. This is divisive, rude, and derails the thread. Our first priority is to the members that have come here because of the flame-free atmosphere we provide.

    There is a zero-tolerance policy here against personal attacks. We will not tolerate anyone insulting other's opinion nor name calling. Our call is to be supportive, not divisive. We all need to agree or disagree without being disagreeable.

    OP I hope your Dad is feeling better......as a student nurse, take this as a learning experience. While I choose to believe the nurses meant no disrespect.....in the grind of our daily lives as bedside nurses "we" sometimes forget that the perception by the public can be viewed as inappropriate and not completely understand the motivation behind the behavior. They may have been laughing that they were relieved that the patient didn't have chest pain for that would look bad on their "statistics" and "reviews" by administration...and laughing at what a hornets net that would have been.

    Learn what kind of nurse that you don't want to be....remember how you felt when these nurses forgot that they are within ear shot of the entire department.......and apply it to your practice.

    However.....as a LONG time ED nurse....I feel that their behavior is inappropriate. Nurses in the ED need to be especially cognizant of the public's perception of the behavior/demeanor/functioning/workings of a normal emergency department for what is "normal" for us, because we have seen 57 flu's that day as it is "going around", is very special and frightening to that family/patient who's only concern is their family member.

    I have told staff and co-workers that one of the worst patients to triage on a BUSY night......is a toddler with their first laceration on their chin or forehead and convince the irate parents that this is a survivable injury, their child will not bleed to death while they wait and that everything WILL be OK....without sounding sarcastic or condescending...is an art form.

    I think we all need to remember that while it is routine to us...it is not to the patients. As a reluctant and recent consumer and observer of healthcare and emergency departments my one singular suggestions top ALL NURSES is this.....

    We patients can HEAR EVERY WORD. EVERY SINGLE WORD. We have NOTHING else better to do but to eavesdrop on your EVERY single conversation and discussion.

    Remember this if you aren't willing to repeat your conversation on the hospitals overhead announcement system or sent via Skype to administration and your boss....your conversation is probably better left for the breakroom.
    beckyboo1, NB19938, WoosahRN, and 4 others like this.
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    I know that they were relieved that it wasn't chest pain. But the way they said it and made this look with their face was what irritated me. I had said I mistakenly thought he had said chest pain as well that's why I wrote it down. I appreciate all of your thoughts and comments. Now I know what kind of a nurse I wouldnt want to be. The sad part is...I heard conversation about other patients that were in the rooms as well. What happened to HIPPA? we're all nurses who need to compassionate...it just gives us a bad name if some nurses continue talking within the earshot of patients. Put yourself in my situation where you are a nurse and take your loved one to the hospital. How would you feel if this happened to you? Even though you are understanding of the stress nurses are in...it would still bother you.
    Susie2310 likes this.
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    This post has now been heavily edited.

    Please stick to the topic and be polite or the thread will be closed and points assigned.
    AngelicDarkness likes this.
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    Hate that happened and hope your dad's better. You'd be surprised how many people indicate "chest pain" thinking they'll be seen faster in the ER. One of my teachers worked in the ED and had a coworker who would roll the pts who falsely claimed chest pain back to the waiting room. The nurses could have a standing "bet" as to whether the chest pain pt really has chest pain or not, who knows? As for HIPAA, if no identifying info was given then no violation there. Like I said, hope your dad's better and you'll be a better nurse by not letting something like this happen when you're on duty.
    corky1272RN likes this.
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    Quote from obloom14
    I know that they were relieved that it wasn't chest pain. But the way they said it and made this look with their face was what irritated me. I had said I mistakenly thought he had said chest pain as well that's why I wrote it down. I appreciate all of your thoughts and comments. Now I know what kind of a nurse I wouldnt want to be. The sad part is...I heard conversation about other patients that were in the rooms as well. What happened to HIPPA? we're all nurses who need to compassionate...it just gives us a bad name if some nurses continue talking within the earshot of patients. Put yourself in my situation where you are a nurse and take your loved one to the hospital. How would you feel if this happened to you? Even though you are understanding of the stress nurses are in...it would still bother you.
    I am so sorry you experienced this and as a patient myself I too have experienced this behavior. Sometime I have directed my conversations to the ones talking but more often than not I will address it with the manager of patient advocate. It is rude and unprofessional behavior. I recently was very ill with bacterial PNA and I had searing chest pain. I thought I was having a heart attack so don't feel bad.

    This experience......It will make you a better nurse. ((HUGS))
    nrsang97 likes this.
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    Quote from Esme12
    I am so sorry you experienced this and as a patient myself I too have experienced this behavior. Sometime I have directed my conversations to the ones talking but more often than not I will address it with the manager of patient advocate. It is rude and unprofessional behavior. I recently was very ill with bacterial PNA and I had searing chest pain. I thought I was having a heart attack so don't feel bad.

    This experience......It will make you a better nurse. ((HUGS))
    Thanks. Won't be letting this happen in the future!
    Esme12 likes this.
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    (Just getting here. Not a good sign that it's already been edited.)

    Don't be afraid to step out and say "Um, we can hear you guys in there." I can guarantee they're lips will be sealed after that.

    I've put my foot in my mouth a few times that way. I've also been a patient and treated that way. It's stinks.

    I've learned to not be afraid to say "Um that's enough guys." I learned pretty quickly to stay professional. You'd be surprised at how often a family member is standing right behind you to ask for a drink while you are talking about treatment for that patient.
    Last edit by NurseOnAMotorcycle on Feb 7, '13 : Reason: grammar fix


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