Please be prepared for your interview...

  1. 11
    We have been doing interviews for a new hospital that's opening so we are looking for 50 ED people. After the first day I was really surprised at the amount of people who were not prepared for their interview. We had some well qualified candidates who had no idea who my company even is..yes they were from out of town but I feel they should have at least Googled us...some candidates had no idea how to answer questions about weaknesses or situations when...so I have a few suggestions for you great people who are possibly looking for work.

    --Please know something about the company you are applying to...even just a quick Google search.
    --Please be prepared to answer questions like, "Tell me about a time when you had a great connection with a patient", or "Tell me about a time when you were unable to give the kind of care you like to".
    --Please be prepared to talk about your own weaknesses or what your previous supervisor would say is your weakness. (Everyone can list their strengths)
    --Don't be afraid to brag about yourself and for gosh sakes hold your head up high, you are an ED nurse with some experience otherwise you wouldn't have been given the interview.
    --We love honesty, if you are trying to portray characteristics that are unnatural it usually looks awkward. (i.e. if you are a quite person, just say that, don't try to be over the top to try and cover it up)
    --And please make every possible effort to come and sit for the interview, management doesn't like to do phone interviews :-)

    Anyone else want to add anything?

    BTW...we had some absolutely great people who applied and were prepared, thinking about 50% will be offered so far (which is great!).

    Larry
    FaithGurl93, MlbCNA, mariebailey, and 8 others like this.

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  2. 72 Comments...

  3. 4
    Just curious are you considering new grads?
    anotherone, Not_A_Hat_Person, fnazir, and 1 other like this.
  4. 0
    Quote from Larry77

    --Don't be afraid to brag about yourself and for gosh sakes hold your head up high, you are an ED nurse with some experience otherwise you wouldn't have been given the interview.


    Larry
    Maybe not?
  5. 0
    and if so...where is the location of this new hospital?
  6. 1
    I've rarely been in the position of having to answer those silly HR type questions. And I am completely soured on hospitals and their lousy staffing levels due to "finances."

    I've got a ton of experience and a good interviewer should ALWAYS pick up on that. Knowing how long you've been in the previous position, (ER/ICU, etc.) should obviously dictate what you do or don't know. One year in ER? Well, you've got a lot more to see. Ten years in a Level one? Skip the questions and when can you start?

    And I agree with Texas. If you smoke and are fat, I don't want you.
    RNFiona likes this.
  7. 1
    Amen! I don't want someone telling me what to do who obviously doesn't believe it enough to do it him/herself. Medical conditions are one thing - double whoppers and milkshakes are another.
    RNFiona likes this.
  8. 3
    I'm always amazed at how unprofessional and unprepared people have been when we interview them. I agree, it's about 50/50. Half are great and about half are appalling!

    The most baffling ones have a GREAT résumé, qualifications and experience in writing........then show up late to the interview in stained scrubs, no knowledge of the company, Cheeto stained fingers and their cell phone not turned off. Amazing.

    Almost as bad, are the young BS'ers. Oh. My. God. Sorry Charlie, one year in LTC is not "extensive" experience, your only weakness is NOT that you're a workaholic, and no one cares about your hobbies of marathon running or basket weaving.

    Then we have the high maintenance ones who, once offered the job (always AFTER the offer!) suddenly drop bombs like "I have a special needs child and will need 2 afternoons a week off to take him to PT," "I have lupus and CFS and have MD orders to have therapy 2x/week for 3 hours, and can't lift more than 5 lbs.," or we discover is a heavy smoker going through a divorce who is outside puffing away & shouting on her cell phone 6 times a shift, and calls off every other week.

    And we only interview new grads who have BSNs, years of experience in a related/allied health field, and interview EXTREMELY well.
    Denroc72, jalyc RN, and itsmejuli like this.
  9. 22
    Quote from blondesareeasy
    And I agree with Texas. If you smoke and are fat, I don't want you.
    I'd prefer someone fat to someone that doesn't even know the name of a major hospital regulation would be HIPAA, not "hippa."
    Quote from blondesareeasy
    It ain't hippa if there are no identifiable factors. You can go on TV and talk about it too.
    brillohead, Sweet charm, psu_213, and 19 others like this.
  10. 16
    Quote from blondesareeasy
    I've rarely been in the position of having to answer those silly HR type questions. And I am completely soured on hospitals and their lousy staffing levels due to "finances."

    I've got a ton of experience and a good interviewer should ALWAYS pick up on that. Knowing how long you've been in the previous position, (ER/ICU, etc.) should obviously dictate what you do or don't know. One year in ER? Well, you've got a lot more to see. Ten years in a Level one? Skip the questions and when can you start?

    And I agree with Texas. If you smoke and are fat, I don't want you.
    Hiring a resume without assessing the person and their potential fit in your unit is a recipe for disaster, IMO.

    As for the smoking/fat comment ... well, we all have our turnoffs, and some discretion to act upon them when we are in the hiring driver's seat. My turnoff is fast-talking big mouths that say little.
    brillohead, pseudomonas, Nascar nurse, and 13 others like this.
  11. 5
    Thanks for the tips Larry. I also want to add that sending a thank you note might be old-fashioned but in this day and age of few jobs and very qualified applicants, it can make you stand out just a little more. When Ive interviewed nurses/PAs for a position, I was very surprised when one applicant said they felt that they couldnt work with NPs, only PAs. (The people interviewing her were one PA, one NP and one CNS - uh guess who didnt get the job?)
    Akewataru, hiddencatRN, Altra, and 2 others like this.


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