Now you can schedule APPOINTMENTS in the ER...????

  1. 1
    Okay, first we had waiting times posted on the internet, then we had that you could send a SMS/Text message and get the waiting time in the ER....now we have....wait for it - "Scheduling Appointment Times" for the ER....can you believe it?

    What do you think?

    Read for yourself...http://www.ghs.org/inquicker

    Mark Boswell
    FNP-BC, MSN, CEN, CFRN, CTRN, CPEN, NREMT-P
    "Support CEN Certification and your ENA"
    Esme12 likes this.
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  3. 19 Comments so far...

  4. 1
    I would not have beleaved it if i did not see it !!
    Esme12 likes this.
  5. 10
    Ok. If you have time to schedule an appointment and relax at home, ER is not the place you should be going!
    CoffeeGeekRN, canoehead, shoegalRN, and 7 others like this.
  6. 0
    Is it actually to see an ER Doc? We have a GP out of hours surgery attached to our ER. It's totally separate but you get to it through ER waiting room.
    Last edit by JDZ344 on May 14, '14
  7. 1
    Why not just say ... we now have a 24-hour walk-in clinic ... and separate it from emergency medicine entirely?

    Having worked in an affluent suburban ER, I can see limited use of this concept in "ERs" with a high volume of low acuity patient traffic from a patient population able and willing to use internet access to complete such a transaction. The $4.99 fee will be, IMO, a turn-off -- no one pays $4.99 for call ahead seating at a restaurant. Additionally, this marketing will have to overcome people's emotional attachment to their local hospital to really effectively be able to "distribute" patient flow among several campuses.

    Frankly, the urgent care chains (MinuteClinic, MedExpress, etc.) do the low-acuity thing better, in a way that makes most people satisfied with the care, provided that there is an actual physician present.

    I also think there is a margin of liability with this ... the laceration with controlled bleeding that does need suturing but because it's not convenient, does not actually present until the window since the time of injury has elapsed. The sprain vs. fracture that turns out to have vascular involvement. The middle aged female who is convinced she "slept wrong" on her left shoulder/left arm. In other words, the presentations that look different to a medical professional who actually eyeballs the patient than they do to a layperson.
    mwboswell likes this.
  8. 2
    Quote from Altra
    Why not just say ... we now have a 24-hour walk-in clinic ... and separate it from emergency medicine entirely?

    Having worked in an affluent suburban ER, I can see limited use of this concept in "EARs" with a high volume of low acuity patient traffic from a patient population able and willing to use Internet access to complete such a transaction. The $4.99 fee will be, IMO, a turn-off -- no one pays $4.99 for call ahead seating at a restaurant. Additionally, this marketing will have to overcome people's emotional attachment to their local hospital to really effectively be able to "distribute" patient flow among several campuses.

    Frankly, the urgent care chains (Minute Clinic, Med-Express, etc.) do the low-acuity thing better, in a way that makes most people satisfied with the care, provided that there is an actual physician present.

    I also think there is a margin of liability with this ... the laceration with controlled bleeding that does need suturing but because it's not convenient, does not actually present until the window since the time of injury has elapsed. The sprain vs. fracture that turns out to have vascular involvement. The middle aged female who is convinced she "slept wrong" on her left shoulder/left arm. In other words, the presentations that look different to a medical professional who actually eyeballs the patient than they do to a layperson.
    Never thought I'd see the day.......

    I agree about the margin of liability. I wonder how they get around EMTALA and triage. What are the ramifications are if the "flu" or gallbladder flare up end up being an MI? Are they actually scheduling their ED wait time or is this for Urgent care? How are they tried on arrival? Not all areas in the country have the urgent care chains (or a "Doc in a box" as I like to call them). In my state they have not been allowed by the state and the AMA (who lobby vehemently against them) in the state except in CVS or other pharmacies where there are ANP's.

    In my experience in most ED's it's convincing the patients that their injury is NOT life threatening, and they can wait. Especially in the affluent ED I worked in, they all felt entitled to be seen first because of who they were, and what they've donated. I can still see the problem if someone "called in" and arrived having the "big one" and you moved them "ahead" of someone else.......getting the "I paid for my spot first!" crap. Hummmm...

    I'm now actually curious enough to call them to ask just how it's done.....
    DizzyLizzyNurse and Altra like this.
  9. 0
    Quote from Esme12
    I wonder how they get around EMTALA and triage.

    ...

    I can still see the problem if someone "called in" and arrived having the "big one" and you moved them "ahead" of someone else.......getting the "I paid for my spot first!" crap. Hummmm...
    EMTALA is not the issue ... assuming they're seeing everyone that does present. But you raise a very good point about triage principles. Imagine having to defend your actions as the triage nurse, juggling the VIP call aheads with the walkins who are actually sick. Not a pleasant picture.
  10. 0
    From the link in the OP:
    in the ER and MD360 (urgent care) experience.
    I've never seen an urgent care that didn't book appts in addition to taking walk-ins, including hospital based urgent care clinics.
  11. 2
    The comparisons above are to urgent care clinics, not a real Emergency Room. My ED also has an urgent care center attached and once a person is triaged in the ER, it is determined which is the better place for them. I don't see how you can properly triage someone via appt. For that matter, why would you want to turn your ER into an urgent care center? What is the point in calling it an "Emergency Room" at that point? Society as a whole needs to be re-taught the definition of "emergency care" and "emergent" issues. I agree with the poster above, if you are at home in your recliner, it is not an emergency. Unfortunately though, that is not reality, but really now....this is way too much!!!
    DizzyLizzyNurse and Altra like this.
  12. 7
    Uh lets see, my husband is about to become a full arrest, let me see if I can pre-book and I'll just keep doing CPR at home....
    sissiesmama, amymina, Crux1024, and 4 others like this.


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