How'd You Get Your ER Job? - page 2

by commonsense

11,361 Unique Views | 41 Comments

I'm hoping to find an Emergency Room job when I graduate next year and was wondering how everyone found their job. My plan is to look for openings that do not require experience, just prefer it, then show up on the unit in... Read More


  1. 0
    Quote from hoopschick
    Yes, I would have to highly advise against just showing up and plopping a resume into the hands of the ED Manager.

    For one thing, hospitals are investing so much these days in training nurses that managers don't necessarily have the ability to hire anyone they want. They often have to be vetted thru HR first, and it may even be against policy to hire without that HR stamp of approval first before the manager can even interview you.

    Look around for any hospitals that are offering a Versant residency, or similar type of new grad specialty residency.

    Have you done a practicum or clinical in ER yet thru school?

    Is that an option?

    How do you know you want to work in ER?

    It's an incredibly steep learning curve, even for nurses with experience, so be prepared to hate it at times, and know that you will be willing to commit to at least 2 years before you really feel comfortable in ER, as well as continuing to study and take specialty training while working.
    Thank you for advising me against showing up with my resume, I'm used to doing that for other jobs but I think you and the other posters are right, that might work against me in this situation. I have done ER rotations in clinicals at multiple hospitals and have fallen in love with the department. I know I'm just a student at clinicals and it's much harder once you're on the floor as a nurse, but I know I could handle it with the proper orientation period. I love the ER because it is so fast-paced and the dull moments are few and far in between. I have done rotations in PACU and similar departments and they were dreadful, too much dead time for me.
  2. 1
    If you're still in school, can you get a part-time job as an er tech? It's the best way to get hired.
    hoopschick likes this.
  3. 0
    Quote from emtb2rn
    If you're still in school, can you get a part-time job as an er tech? It's the best way to get hired.
    I went searching for a job as an ER tech last summer and it was a no-go. I'm currently working as well and will be until I graduate, it's a good job that pays well with minimal hours and works with my school schedule, unfortunately it's not healthcare related.
  4. 0
    I took ACLS straight out of school, worked med/surg and ICU for a year, busted my butt with OT and extra training and prayed for an opening. I am glad for the year on one the floor and cross training, I'm the only ER employee that can consistently pick up OT because of it.
  5. 0
    Quote from ZooMommyRN
    I took ACLS straight out of school, worked med/surg and ICU for a year, busted my butt with OT and extra training and prayed for an opening. I am glad for the year on one the floor and cross training, I'm the only ER employee that can consistently pick up OT because of it.
    There's noooooo shortage of OT in my ER. We're undstaffed and coming up to our busy season.
  6. 3
    As a new nurse, I applied to the large hospitals first, got one interview but no offer. On my second round, I included small, rural hospitals as well. Got an interview at a 20 bed ER, gave it my best and got an offer a few days later. The small hospital is part of the same system that has the level 1 trauma center I'd like to end up in. Working here will get me ER experience in a relatively calmer setting, with a smaller, more close knit team, and get me in the system to be an internal applicant if I decide to move to the larger hospital later.

    Don't discount the <100 bed rural hospitals.
    murphyle, TheSquire, and Altra like this.
  7. 1
    I got my first ER job by being Facebook friends with my old (third year) Clinical Instructor who happened to be the Nurse Educator at that time at an inner city ER. I called him up and asked if they were hiring, told me to send him my resume and HR called me the next day to schedule an interview. It pays to network!
    MsJrenae likes this.
  8. 1
    I am in my last year of nursing school and asked my program director about signing up for clinical work experience credits on top of my class and clinical schedule. There are about five of us doing it and working full time with nurses in various departments. I worked hard and got into the ED and by the time my last term comes up I should be able to completely handle my own down there and prove i've got what it takes. I have heard other new grads have gotten hired this way and have used this as basically my chance to shine and show em' what I got. It's exhausting on top of everything else but so worth it since I HAVE TO GET HIRED IN THE ED! You should see if your program will allow you to do something like this. Hate to say it but most the time you've got to know someone or have a chance to show them what you can handle to get hired on out of school.

    I know that it has been commented on several times, but I cannot advise you strongly enough against going into any ED and handing the director your resume. I would almost say that's enough not to get a call back ... it may show you dont understand the culture of the ED. If you've got the desire find a way.. I wish you lots of luck!!!
    hiddencatRN likes this.
  9. 1
    I'm taking an Emergency Nursing course (which is kicking my ass BTW), and plan to do a practicum next semester in the ED. This in addition to working a clerical position in the ED for almost 3 years. I hope it works.
    Pneumothorax likes this.
  10. 0
    ER tech for 10 years, paramedic 15....sweet talked the director


Top