Complaints vs Safety of the Nursing Staff - page 2

Hello All, Wondering..... Over the many years of patient care I have..... I am seeing more and more verbal and physical abuse of the nursing staff by patients and families in the ED....I am... Read More

  1. by   Indiana ED RN
    Originally posted by cotjockey
    RIght now, the management team is on a HUGE "the customer is always right" kick.
    Gosh this must be every where. I thought there was a nursing shortage? Wouldn't hospitals want to protect the staff they have.... there always will be patients!

    Me
  2. by   DIPLOMATICRN4HIRE
    The abuse issue and assault depends on each state. Most go on the basis of the assault, and assault and battery. It doesnt matter healthcare worker or not but if you are at work you can also charge them with disruption of work and your work can also press charges. There are a few other loop holes you can get them on.
    Zoe
  3. by   flashpoint
    LOL...we don't have to call and appologize to patietns we've made mad yet...we do get called in and talked to any time a patient complains about us. Doesn't matter if the complaint is valid or not. A few months ago a patient called anf accused me of tapping her phone so I could steal her man...nurse manager wnated to know what I might have said or done to make the patient beleive that...LOL...not shoved her psych meds down her throat, perhaps?
  4. by   moonrose2u
    i think its because health care is now so competitive, and hospitals are clammering for patients...trying all kinds of glitzy marketing tricks to obtain pts..you know, they come out every other day with a new "survey" that announces THEIR hospital as the best in the area, or Tristate...all marketing gimmicks, but it shows you how desperate the hospitals are....

    so, yes the customer is always right..no matter the circumstances....the staffer is an employee serving the customer....you do the math...
  5. by   Little One2
    Its the same everywhere. There seems to be a lack of respect for nurses everywhere.

    The one thing I found troubling at my old hospital is that the nurses in one department (emergency) don't respect nurses in another department (medicine).

    On my old floor, the er nurses would call to give report at our busiest times, such as shift change. They don't respect the fact that the nurse is busy and there might not be another nurse available to take report. Then they would send up the patient at shift change. Which I find is not very considerate.

    I believe nurses need to work together as a team.
  6. by   BBFRN
    Originally posted by Indiana ED RN
    Gosh this must be every where. I thought there was a nursing shortage? Wouldn't hospitals want to protect the staff they have.... there always will be patients!

    Me
    I'm thinking it's their JCAHO status they want to protect.
  7. by   tatianamik
    Originally posted by Little One2
    Its the same everywhere. There seems to be a lack of respect for nurses everywhere.

    The one thing I found troubling at my old hospital is that the nurses in one department (emergency) don't respect nurses in another department (medicine).

    On my old floor, the er nurses would call to give report at our busiest times, such as shift change. They don't respect the fact that the nurse is busy and there might not be another nurse available to take report. Then they would send up the patient at shift change. Which I find is not very considerate.
    We have a problem at my hospital. The floor nurses and secretarys will hold all the discharges until the end of thier shift and then enter them right before they go home. The ER patient that we have been waiting on a bed for 8 hours gets assigned right at shift change and we have 30 minutes from recieving the bed assignment until they have to be going up to the floor.
  8. by   NancyRN
    Last edit by NancyRN on Jan 11, '03
  9. by   Dr. Kate
    It seems that everyone is on the #1 in customer service bandwagon. And it's not just in hospitals.

    I just bought a used car and within a week I had a letter from the sales manager telling me I would be receiving a customer service survey from the company represented by the dealership. The letter went on to tell me that if on a 1 to 5 scale with 5 as the best, they didn't get a 5, they were considered to have failed in customer service. BTW, the car I bought was not made by the parent company of the dealership. Let me tell you, they have bent over backwards to make me happy. When the service manager got a bit edgy, I apologized for being "perty" and mentioned the sales manager had said to call him, next thing he was apologizing to me and got rid of the edginess. Have I milked it a bit? Yeah, have to admit I have, all legit but still . . .
    It's become the same in hospitals. The problem is, IMO, that where it is relatively easy to make repairs to a car so it meets the customer's expectations, it just doesn't work the same way with sick people. You can't fix everything, sometimes there are inevitable bad outcomes. The powers that be have latched onto a good concept and applied it wrong.
    Both hospitals I work for are big into customer service. Where I am house mouse I spend more time than I'd like fielding compliants for legitimate and silly issues. I have learned to be very noncommital, to validate the person's feelings without validating the legitimacy of the complaint. And of course, to document, document, document.
    Several years ago, one of the hospitals had a patient satisfaction campaign that involved everyone wearing buttons that said, I kid you not, "satisfaction guaranteed" I refused to even take one of the fool things. I mean really, "I'm sorry your child is brain dead from the accident but we guarantee your satisfaction," give me a break. That campaign didn't last long, but it remains a personal archetype for the headlong rush into unthoughtout customer service campaigns.

    I think overall we are seeing throughout society in general a decrease in impulse control and the ability to tolerate any level of frustration. It comes out in subtle and not so subtle ways. Unfortunately, those of us in healthcare get to see people at their worst and most vulnerable (sometimes their best and most noble, but that's another discussion) and the worst has gotten really bad. But no one has a right to threaten or assault another person. And only those without the mental capacity to understand their actions are to be given any leeway--IMHO.
  10. by   kaycee
    Great post Dr. Kate. You said it best!
  11. by   angelbear
    How good will customer satisfaction be when there are no nurses left to serve said customer. Admin and management need to think about that. A happy, secure and satisfied staff makes for better customer service over all.
  12. by   eddy
    Man oh man! This reminds me of something that I went through about a year ago. I was working a night shift in the ER....

    A huge guy, probably 280 pounds jumped on top of the female Doc and strarted choking her. I was the only male in the ER that night. The Doc was terrified to say the least and her face was a shade of purple I have never seen before. I yelled at a stunned motionless nurse to run and grab the security guard and promptly grabbed the guy and after some wrestling around, managed to pry his arms from the poor woman's neck. She fell to the floor gasping. The security guard arrived a few seconds later as I was still wrestling around with this crazy man. It took every bit of both of our combined efforts to restrain this guy. He finally got him cuffed and took him away. I had a nice bloody nose but other than that escaped pretty unharmed. The Doc was in pretty bad shape and was crying. She amazingly composed herself after a few minutes. However, that's not the end of the story. I was accused of misconduct which is of course the default thing anymore. I had to defend myself and my license because of this. Quite honestly had it not been for the Doc's assuring administration that she would have been killed I think my career as a nurse would have been put to an end right there. The most senseless thing to the story... This guy was angry that we were "fixing" the guy that he had just beat to a pulp for sleeping with his girlfriend, yet he had the nerve to secure a lawyer and try to sue me and the hospital! Of course nothing came of that, BUT the Doc did press charges and he ended up doing a little time.

    This whole guilty for EVERYTHING until proven innocent is pretty sad. A hospital would rather sacrifice an employee before defending them. Sick!

    -eddy
  13. by   kaycee
    Geez eddy I can't believe you were accused of misconduct. Well maybe I can. Are you still working in that facility?
    There was a hospital worker shot to death in the waiting room of one of the local hospitals here. She was trying to counsel a pt. Guess she had it coming. You know the customer is always right.
    Glad you and the doc are ok and that customer is spending some quality time where he belongs.

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