Difference in gluco checks

  1. 0
    First gluco check was done on left hand index finger, 314. VERY high for resident. After joking with her that I would do a recheck on her right pinkie finger because maybe it would be lower (because the finger is smaller), 145. normal for resident.
    Why such a difference?
    I used the same type of test strips, same glucometer, same type alcohol swabs.
    Only thing I can think of is maybe I didn't clean her finger off good enough and there was some food or something left over that was picked up in the high reading.
  2. 13 Comments so far...

  3. 1
    My first thought was to think something was funky about the glucometer!!! Those little things take such a brutal beating with high usage, drops on the floor, and all those in-between cleanings. I have to use them on the floor but whenever I get such disparate results, I get another meter. I just don't trust those little buggers!

    Also, think about operator error - was the blood drop juicy enough? A skimpy sample can give a lower reading. Did the test strips match the bottle? Frequent BIG BIG error. Are your machine calibrated/checked as required? Most places do QA checks each shift. Do a test with the hi-lo reagents. You may need to change the strips and bottle chip and try again.

    Two so different readings would not be enough for me to proceed with an intervention until I was ABSOTIVELY, POSOLUTELY :redlight: comfortable with the results.
    GrnTea likes this.
  4. 0
    Also, if you don't let the alcohol dry before doing the fingerstick, that can give a false high.
  5. 0
    A finger stick blood glucose sample that has too much interstitial fluid can result in a falsely low reading.

    Also, if the patient has ever had a stroke (CVA) in the past, do not obtain the blood glucose sample on the affected side.
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    I dont trust the machines either. I was taught to never use the thumb or pinky because they give abnormally high and low values.
  7. 0
    I was taught to never use the thumb or pinky because they give abnormally high and low values.
    Interesting - I had not heard that before. I actually have a resident that only has a thumb and a pinky (the others have been amputated).
  8. 5
    Quote from Kittypower123
    Interesting - I had not heard that before. I actually have a resident that only has a thumb and a pinky (the others have been amputated).
    I've been a nurse TOO long , I found that funny.
    turnforthenurseRN, dudette10, Altra, and 2 others like this.
  9. 0
    Handheld glucometers are highly inaccurate. Per the ISO standards they only need to be within plus or minus 20% of laboratory standards 95% of the time.
  10. 0
    Quote from Been there,done that
    I've been a nurse TOO long , I found that funny.
    Omg me too! I've done forearms for this reason.
  11. 0
    I use the thumb all the time. Toes sometimes, too. I'm still always in the pts normal range.


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