Is it worth it to become a CNA on my road to becoming a nurse? - page 3

by sucess2012

6,445 Views | 43 Comments

Is it worth it to become a Cna on my road too becoming a nurse. I am still not done with my prerequisite and am looking to gain experience. I am thinking about getting Cna training and trying to find a job. But I have a question... Read More


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    I always thought CNA for me would be pointless after I took the class, but when I ended up getting a job inside the hospital it helped me out a lot during nursing school, somtimes to much where I felt too ahead of the class with to much experience that material wasnt as interesting to me since I seen and done that already. If you have your CNA I recommend working in a hospital to get the most variety since they float you to different floors sometimes and you learn a lot about the patient and talking to family, and in the end they all appreciate it even if you just take the time to listen to them. Overall in the future always "listen to the patient, because the patient will provide you with the right answers"
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    Quote from sucess2012
    Is it worth it to become a Cna on my road too becoming a nurse. I am still not done with my prerequisite and am looking to gain experience. I am thinking about getting Cna training and trying to find a job. But I have a question do Cna's even make decent money(I live in Sacramento)? Will Cna experience help me with nursing as a student and finding a job? I just am unsure.
    I have been a CNA Going on 13 years now so I have worked with numerous nurses who were CNAs prior and nurses who were not, I think it is invaluable to your experience. After working as a CNA you understand that the patient care better, I am graduating on December 14, and in my interviews my CNA experience has always been brought up as a positive toward getting hired. I think you gain a lot of experience and you can better understand what it takes to be a nurse after working as a CNA. I would say go for it I am in Illinois and the colleges here required you to get your CNA although you do not have to work as a CNA before you are accepted into the nursing program. I think that it is an experience that you will be glad you took advantage of when you are working as a nurse
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    I don't know about where you live but I live in Arkansas and no, they don't make good money here (about $8.00/hr), and yes it is a different job altogether, but here it is required to get into the nursing program....at least for the RN's anyway.
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    In my own personal experience it is definitely worth being a CNA first. I am also going to school for nursing and have been a CNA for quite awhile. Not only does it count as points toward the nursing program but it is great experience. In the facility where I used to work, cna's did a lot of the same things as the nurses and also directly assisted nurses too. You learn so much and I really do think it helps prepare you to become a nurse. Not to mention, additional education is never a waste of time. Good luck!
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    Can't comment on the pay but as far as getting your feet wet and getting into the swing of things, go for it (it you have the time.) I got my CNA license to give me some experience and to put on nursing application and it worked. I learned a lot in that 2 years at a facility and it helped A LOT while I was in school but I did have to quit to focus on my stdies.
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    I'm unsure about the pay because I'm in Ga but I think CNA would definitely help you. I'm fact, my manager has said if she had two applications and both were new grad nurses, one had CNA experience and one didn't, she would definitely hire the new grad with CNA experience. The experience with patients/residents is great. You can't compare it to clinicals.
    sharonp30 likes this.
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    Quote from klynn81
    As far as pay, I work at a hospital and starting pay is just over $17/hr. not including any shift/weekend premiums. To me I'd say that's 'decent'.
    If you don't mind me asking, what city/state are you in? $17 for a CNA is extraordinary!
    RunnerRN2b2014 and sharonp30 like this.
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    I also live in the Sacramento area. I found obtaining my CNA while working towards obtaining my nursing degree helped immensely and in speaking to nurses, I found that the ones who had been CNA's before or during nursing school found it to help them be better prepared for certain aspects of their roles as LVN's and RN's. I also would like to think it made them kinder and more empathetic to the CNA's they worked with as they had been in their shoes at one point and were more apt to be mentor-ish to those of us furthering our education.

    I know if you are going for your LVN, most schools in Sacramento require or strongly recommend you obtain your CNA before applying to their programs. For RN schooling, generally they do not bring this up; however since the wait time to get into a RN program is so long locally, obtaining the CNA and then LVN and then doing the bridge to RN and BSN might be the quicker and better option.

    CNA's here make between $10-12 to start depending on where you work. If you have your CHHA with the CNA, most home health agencies will pay you more than if you do not have it. Not bad for only one more week of training.

    Incidentally, SETA will pay for your CNA training in Sacramento. They contract with one or two schools that are state approved training facilities in our area. This includes your Live Scan which you have to do before you can do clinicals and before the state will even issue your CNA as well as tuition, books, BP kit (stethoscope and cuff), school uniform (except white shoes), and American Red Cross testing. In roughly a month, you could have your CNA and can start applying for work the day you pass your ARC exam. The CHHA course is usually the week after the ARC testing and Curam College includes it in the amount they charge SETA for your CNA. So you get both for the price of one.

    Hope that helps some. :-)
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    Wow, that's great pay for a CNA, klynn81. In north FL the average seems to be about nine to ten dollars per hour. In fact the average LPN pay in FL in a bit over nineteen dollars per hour. What state are you in?
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    Quote from sharonp30
    Wow, that's great pay for a CNA, klynn81. In north FL the average seems to be about nine to ten dollars per hour. In fact the average LPN pay in FL in a bit over nineteen dollars per hour. What state are you in?
    No state. Province. I'm in Canada

    with that said..I am American and my sister and I have talked about the wages that CNA/LPN/RN make in the states and I've come to the conclusion that I'd probably never move south of the border again especially without going back to school for nursing first because I find the pay insulting. (been there done that, I worked as a CNA in the states oh say probably 12yrs ago and got paid A LOT less. I believe it was $8 or $9 at that time).


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