Chamberlain Nursing School... Is it worth it???

  1. So I am beginning my nursing journey. Gathering all the info I need. Getting my classes together. Going to take my pre reqs at a community college.. Going to meet with an advisor tomorrow. My question is this: Is Chamberlain worth it for $90,000? I'm 21 with a 5 year old son. I wrote down many questions to ask myself and one being where I want to be 5 years from now. And that is a Registered Nurse working with children at a hospital. I've been all year weighing my options about pursuing my nursing degree once all my pre reqs are completed and city colleges of Chicago I will be waiting until either Fall of 2016 or Fall f 2017. I am in no real rush to get in school ASAP but I was hoping to get in Malcolm X by the Spring of 2016 or the Fall and the fact that it isnt a guarantee whatsoever kinda bothers me. I dont want to waste 2 years of my life waiting to get into nursing school whereas at Chamberlain, I could be right after I finish my pre reqs and in 2 years I will be one step closer to getting my BSN. Is Chamberlain worth it? It is CCNE accredited. I've been doing my research on this school and know a couple of people who is either attending it or have graduated from there.

    Should I go for it?
    I am looking at it form a different perspective than some. I'm not so worried about my loans and funding for school while I am there because I think thats negative and can be very stressful. I will worry about it when I graduate and become the Nurse I've only dreamed of.

    Are there any current or alumni students of Chamberlain School of Nursing that can shed some light on me and give me more info and just help me in this journey? All is appreciated. Thanks!
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  2. 73 Comments

  3. by   meanmaryjean
    Negative or not, you SHOULD be thinking seriously about the loans and such. You would be paying a LARGE amount of $$ for a long, long time if you chose the expensive option vs. waiting for a much, much cheaper alternative.

    It is possible that you would be depriving you and your son of decent housing, vacations and comfort by assuming the crushing debt of a $90,000 degree. Run the numbers and see what the payment of that loan would be and how long you'd be paying it. Then think of what that payment might mean to you and your son's lifestyle of years and years to come.
  4. by   AZBlueBell
    Quote from meanmaryjean
    Negative or not, you SHOULD be thinking seriously about the loans and such. You would be paying a LARGE amount of $$ for a long, long time if you chose the expensive option vs. waiting for a much, much cheaper alternative.

    It is possible that you would be depriving you and your son of decent housing, vacations and comfort by assuming the crushing debt of a $90,000 degree. Run the numbers and see what the payment of that loan would be and how long you'd be paying it. Then think of what that payment might mean to you and your son's lifestyle of years and years to come.
    Agreed! There are many loan calculators out there, crunch the numbers and see what it would mean to have that much in loans (or even half of that!!). It will be a lot to have to pay back.

    Is it worth it? Some people may say so. Me personally? There's no way I would ever pay that amount for a BSN. No. Freaking. Way.
  5. by   mirandaaa
    There is absolutely no way I would pay that much for school.
    In all reality, you would be able to attain your dream job even with having attended a community college for a fraction of that.
    From what I understand, most places care about your grades, your GPA, and your NCLEX score when it comes to hiring and could care less what college you went to.

    Pull up a loan calculator and look up what you'll have to pay every month. School loans can stretch out for a number of years, but once interest kicks in, most of your money will be going right into accruing interest and barely touching the principal.

    You'll have to pay $750 a month for 10 whole years in order to pay off the flat $90,000, and this doesn't include any interest.

    I would look into other options if possible.
  6. by   MarquieshaH
    I genuinely understand where both of you are coming from. I know $90,000 is a lot of money for a BSN, hell really thats why I'm even asking questions about it. In my saying that I don't look at it like that is because thats the one con I can think about when choosing this school, if I do. I wanted to see if there were other cons to look at. I know the tuition itself will discourage me from going but at the same time, people who are financially stable right now, I'm sure this same tuition didn't deter them. I don't want that to be my only determining factor, if you know what I'm saying... As for my son and I being deprived, absolutely not. Nurses in my area make a decent amount of money, starting off. I'm in Chicago btw. No, I'm not saying having to pay back X amount of dollars is nothing to me because just paying my phone bill bothers me lol (Im cheap lol)... I definitely appreciate your comments though.
  7. by   bookwormom
    Personally, I'd choose a public or private school over a for-profit school every time, even if I had to wait a few years to get in. I don't know anything about the school, but for-profit schools have been under increased scrutiny lately.
  8. by   MarquieshaH
    I wish I would've posted this sooner, I needed to hear this. I needed to know that waiting is okay. I got really discouraged and was just trying to start as soon as possible so I can be a nurse already you know? $750 is absurd... But I needed that info. Thanks! Waiting is really the best option for me.
  9. by   WookieeRN
    Definitely look at what your employment outlook is in Chicago as a new grad. The last thing you need is a giant debt bubble over your head with a huge payment due and being unemployed for 6 months trying to find a job.
  10. by   SmilingBluEyes
    OP read the thread on paying back student loans. It will be an eye-opening. And NO that school is not worth it, to me.
  11. by   bookwormom
    Are you working in health care now? Here are two suggestions:

    1)Get a job in a health care related field, such as CNA. it will give you some experience and help you have a better idea of nursing.

    or

    2) Consider other health related careers, which may have more openings available-- for example, Occupational Therapy Assistant, Respiratory Therapist, or Physical Therapy Assistant. These educational programs should be available in community colleges and would be great choices for someone who wants a career in helping. Nursing is not the only career where you can work in the medical setting and make a difference in patients' lives.
    Last edit by bookwormom on Apr 16, '15 : Reason: format
  12. by   flyersfan88
    New grad nurses in Chicago don't make enough for that to not be an astounding crippling blow. If that's the only con you have, it's the only one you need. Run far, far away.
  13. by   mirandaaa
    Good luck!

    One of my good friends is a nurse in Chicago and loves it. Hoping to be there soon too and I hope to see you in the future!
  14. by   Hygiene Queen
    Quote from bookwormom
    1)Get a job in a health care related field, such as CNA. it will give you some experience and help you have a better idea of nursing.

    And if you can get a CNA job with an employer that offers tuition reimbursement, you could get a good chunk of your nursing school paid by your employer.

    Some employers require you to work as a nurse for them for a period of time after they pay for your school-- some do not.

    I went to a community college, got tuition reimbursement and a nursing scholarship through work. My education was practically free and I was not required to stay with my employer afterward. I also had my job handed to me because they knew me and my work ethic.

    Just tossing out another option for you.

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