Immigration News and Updates - page 28

This is just for the purpose of getting updated or informed and do note that nothing is absolute and in fact things are very fluid or volatile when it comes to immigration matters.... Read More

  1. by   pinoy_guy
    ummm.

    i bring your attention to

    http://hammondlawgroup.blogspot.com/

    more on the senate deal

    a few key points to keep in mind:

    the likely outcome is that cir will be very positive for all healthcare professionals. the summaries that we have seen call for increased employment based immigrant visas for highly skilled immigrants in high demand occupations: that is nurses, physical therapists, occupational therapists, speech language pathologists, pharmacists, etc. these workers will likely have the option of a temporary visa [color="slategray"]or a permanent residency visa.
    i hope they made a mistake in the order, and that permanent residency visa comes before temporary visa in the final bill.

    personally, i hope they strike out temporary visa.
  2. by   suzanne4
    they can call it what ever they want, but the worst thing that could happen for the nurses is to see temporary work visas, just is not going to fly with many of the hospitals in the us. and with these temporary work visas that they are talking about, they are not renewable. and you must leave the us for at least one year before you could return. length of visa is for two years only.

    there is no way that i would ever tell anyone to even consider a visa like that. no way of renewing it and you will get a crappy place to work at. and nothing will be able to be done about it. bad news for nurses.
  3. by   lawrence01
    Quote from pinoy_guy
    ummm.

    i bring your attention to

    http://hammondlawgroup.blogspot.com/



    i hope they made a mistake in the order, and that permanent residency visa comes before temporary visa in the final bill.

    personally, i hope they strike out temporary visa.
    i think what they meant was a nurse or more appropriately an employer may have an option to petition a nurse via the green card or a temp. visa and of course they have always made it clear that they also do not know for sure until the final draft. so at this point it's really is just pure speculation (they said this themselves). it is the same thing that's happening now - a nurse can be petitioned via green card or the h1c visa (a temp. visa as well) but we all know that the green card option will always be the preferred by majority of nurses.

    this temporary visa, if ever nurses would even be part of it, would just be an option and as suzanne said it's not even sure if it will really be part of the final cir bill and i hope nurses would not be part of it the same way nurses are not usually approved for h1bs (another temp. visa).
    Last edit by lawrence01 on May 18, '07
  4. by   suzanne4
    There are only 15 facilites out of the entire US that can bring a nurse in on the H1-C visa. And they are not in places where most Americans would ever consider working. Only 15 for the entire country. Again, it is something that I would never, ever recommend to anyone. Safety is the number one concern and it is out the door in most of those areas. Many of them are in border towns and not good places to be. Number of patients is extremely high............

    There have not been H1-B visas for nurses for more than 3 years and they were a nightmare before, hospitals will not go that route again. And if there is a union there, they will not be able to use a nurse with a temporary visa in the first place. Plus it will not be renewable, and that is a bad thing for a facility. Why train someone when they have to leave and will not be able to renew for any reason what so ever? And not be able to transfer it into the green card.

    Bad news for nurses. A nurse should never go backwards, and those were bad times. And they do not need to be paid the same as a nurse with a green card. So you may see some unscrupulous agencies pushing it, but they are just going to be selling the nurse as a slave. Something that I am very much against. And once that contract is signed, the nurse will be stuck with it and no recourse out of it.

    They are bad news, and do not let any agency or attorney talk you into it. Good for them, but bad for the nurse.
  5. by   pinoy_guy
    so the news is not as good as we had hoped it would be.

    the language is clear: temporary visa or permanent residency visa.

    suzanne is right--temporary visa is bad news; we can only work for 2 years, come back to the philippines for 1 year before going back to the us for another 2 years, then come back before another 2 years.

    after 8 years, what happens next?

    zilch.

    there are thousands of fresh graduates being churned out every year, so there will be no shortage of fresh applicants.

    however, us hospitals will not be happy training a foreign rn for 3 months and only getting 21 months of work from them.

    factor in the increasing phenomenon of foreign rns needing up to 6 months of orientation before they can be fielded, and it's a bleak scenario.

    no wonder my friends cannot find a single hospital willing to petition--they were told that things are too murky right now.

    agencies...they're not as open to recruiting now, especially with that sentosa case.

    i know of almost a hundred rns willing to take the places of the 26 nurses (who want to shut down sentosa).

    a friend is getting $20/hour, just waiting for her 2-year contract to expire. or maybe she'll just buy out her contract.

    sigh.

    previously, i thought of "trying to go through the eye of the needle" to get here as an appropriate metaphor for getting a us rn job.

    now i wonder, what could be harder than trying to pass through the "eye of the needle?"
  6. by   detroix
  7. by   lawrence01
    Quote from pinoy_guy
    so the news is not as good as we had hoped it would be.

    the language is clear: temporary visa or permanent residency visa.

    suzanne is right--temporary visa is bad news; we can only work for 2 years, come back to the philippines for 1 year before going back to the us for another 2 years, then come back before another 2 years.

    after 8 years, what happens next?

    zilch.

    there are thousands of fresh graduates being churned out every year, so there will be no shortage of fresh applicants.

    however, us hospitals will not be happy training a foreign rn for 3 months and only getting 21 months of work from them.

    factor in the increasing phenomenon of foreign rns needing up to 6 months of orientation before they can be fielded, and it's a bleak scenario.

    no wonder my friends cannot find a single hospital willing to petition--they were told that things are too murky right now.

    agencies...they're not as open to recruiting now, especially with that sentosa case.

    i know of almost a hundred rns willing to take the places of the 26 nurses (who want to shut down sentosa).

    a friend is getting $20/hour, just waiting for her 2-year contract to expire. or maybe she'll just buy out her contract.

    sigh.

    previously, i thought of "trying to go through the eye of the needle" to get here as an appropriate metaphor for getting a us rn job.

    now i wonder, what could be harder than trying to pass through the "eye of the needle?"
    it would really be bad news, if ever. just hope that nurses would be left out of it, the same way nurses are left out of h1bs and if ever nurses would be part of this still unnamed 'temp. visa' that they would not sell themselves short the same way that very, very few nurses opt for h1cs (for reasons suzanne already mentioned above).
  8. by   pinoy_guy
    Quote from lawrence01
    it would really be bad news, if ever. just hope that nurses would be left out of it, the same way nurses are left out of h1bs and if ever nurses would be part of this still unnamed 'temp. visa' that they would not sell themselves short the same way that very, very few nurses opt for h1cs (for reasons suzanne already mentioned above).
    it is bad news.

    h. r. 1358
    to create a new nonimmigrant visa category for registered nurses, and for other purposes.
    so the current bill being considered could have been based on this one.

    i'm starting to think that temporary visa coming before permanent residency visa was no mistake.
  9. by   lawrence01
    This is just one of the many stand-alone bills that have been introduced before CIR. There's one like it in the House's Strive Act (green card for nurses) and a similar version on the Senate's SKIL Bill (green card for nurses). There was also the Hutchinson amendment (recapture of 90,000 visas) and several others more. There's also the yet to be introduced contingency bridge bill and more will be coming if CIR fails.

    One version (most prob. coming from either the Senate's SKIL Bill version or the House's Strive Act) will be included as a provision in the final draft of the CIR Bill and if CIR is approved then all other stand-alone bills (immigrant or non-immigrant) that has ever been introduced specifically for nurses (and there are too many of it to count already) are considered moot.
    Last edit by lawrence01 on May 19, '07
  10. by   suzanne4
    And there are major protests going on all over the US right now over what was in the CIR bill that is being discussed. It is still far from getting approval as it is in the Senate, and the House of Representatives is not in favor of all of it either. There have been some major drug wars just south of the US border, and many are worried of increased drugs in the US because of this and the supposed "amnesty" that is being talked about.

    Until this issue with illegal immigrants in the US is settled, you are not going to see one thing being done about the nurses. And again, most of the delays that have been going on were because of issues with the agency and/or attorney in the first place. When things are filed correctly in the first place and there is no retrogression in place, wait time should only be about a year at the most, not this two and three years that we hear about. That is definitely not the fault of US immigration.
  11. by   owura143
    What happens when a nurse completes his/her contract and have still not recieved the green card. Can she move on to another facility? Is the hospital obligated to honor their part of the contract by not withdrawing the application?
  12. by   english_nurse
    if your contract is a long one i would ask why you havent had your greencard?????
    it belongs to you not an agency/facility!!
  13. by   rozmaril
    Just read HLG blog: they call to vote AGAINST CIR! One of the reasons is that Schedule A occupations are excluded from this reform.

Must Read Topics


close