Immigration News and Updates - page 16

This is just for the purpose of getting updated or informed and do note that nothing is absolute and in fact things are very fluid or volatile when it comes to immigration matters.... Read More

  1. by   purplecotton
    Yes, but the US government DOES have to address this issue (so this takes precedence over the other issues) and so we may be affected indirectly. I just hope that people don't make generalizations about Asians (racial undertones in this event) and see this simply as an isolated incident. Afterall, the Columbine HS killers were white and not Asian. If they were Asian, then i think this would be a bigger problem. Only time will heal and tell.
  2. by   jonRNMD
    Quote from purplecotton
    I just hope that people don't make generalizations about Asians (racial undertones in this event) and see this simply as an isolated incident.
    i have been working here in NY city for the past 7 months and believe me, other ethnic groups do NOT equate Asians as law-breakers or criminals....

    this is a 1998 NYPD.....look at page 10 statistic http://www.nyc.gov/html/nypd/pdf/dclm/execsumm.pdf

    Asians comprise 6.7% of the total NYC population but only 2.2% has been identified by crime victims as the perpetrator.....

    believe me, Asians are gonna be the LAST to be stereotyped as criminals....the Virginia Tech incident is an isolated case

    Asians (the yellow-skinned asians in particular) are stereotyped as being nerdy/studious, good in math and knows karate and not as criminals
  3. by   suzanne4
    Quote from vermountindia
    In my opinion,The shooting incedent was an individual incident and that has nothing to do with green card or citizenship. That persone has kind of phsychological problems and he committed that crime. It is not his green card or citizenship made him to do it. Any of you think,i n America, people with green card only commit these kind of crimes..? Lots of shooting incidents took place in US recently; all of them by green card holder..? When a persone commit a crime, it is not his citizenship or immigration status made him to do the crime, but his mental/phsychological mood make him to do the crime....
    Thats what I feel....Why mixing it with green card...?
    Rgds
    The issue is not that they were from Asia but well documented with psychiatric issues and was permitted to remain in school. That is being investigated, and that is taking time. Something needs to be put in place to deal with this, and the issue that he was not from the US also adds in to it, whether you want to accept it or not. Anytime that someone is a guest in this country and does something, it influences many. And as a green card recipient, you are still a guest. Until US citizenship is yours as well as a US passport, you are not covered under all US laws. And then the next question comes into play: did the rest of his family get citizenship after being here for so long, but he did not because of his history of psych issues? These are just questions that are being discussed here right now, and yes, they do have an influence on things.

    I am not mixing it with the green card, but trying to show that there are other issues that are more important in the US than an RN being expedited for a green card. This seems hard for you to understand.

    There are many nursing unions in the US that are fighting many of the bills that are being posted for foreign nurses. Suggest that you spend time and read what is being said by them. They are actually quite influential in the US. Same with the ANA.

    Please do not try to turn this into a war against words, it is not. Just what is happening in the US right now. And the Attorney General has his job on the line right now as well. And he is the leader of his dept. Bush is focused towards that, as well as the war with the increased fighting right now.

    Nurses are not going to change anything immediately in the US. That is what you are not understanding.

    Going back to my vacation..........................
  4. by   purplecotton
    Quote from jonRNMD
    i have been working here in NY city for the past 7 months and believe me, other ethnic groups do NOT equate Asians as law-breakers or criminals....

    this is a 1998 NYPD.....look at page 10 statistic http://www.nyc.gov/html/nypd/pdf/dclm/execsumm.pdf

    Asians comprise 6.7% of the total NYC population but only 2.2% has been identified by crime victims as the perpetrator.....

    believe me, Asians are gonna be the LAST to be stereotyped as criminals....the Virginia Tech incident is an isolated case

    Asians (the yellow-skinned asians in particular) are stereotyped as being nerdy/studious, good in math and knows karate and not as criminals
    Yep. Maybe so in NY and states that have been exposed to Asians for quite a time...although SOME people with already existing, hidden prejudices may utilize this incident as a valid opportunity to act untowardly towards Asians. Changes may be very subtle...but then again, this only applies to people with narrow-minded views (Asians most certainly not excluded as we also fall into this trap of stereotyping people). Anyway, there will always be other issues attached to this crime (gun control, school safety, etc.) but those are OTHER ISSUES. Your observations and experiences there, jonRNMD, are reassuring though.

    The US government sure needs to get itself straightened out soon and hopefully nursing immigration will "POP up on their radars" so we can get moving (literally) .
  5. by   lawrence01
    there will be a full 2 weeks to be alloted for the debates regarding cir in may and there are some speculation that the democrats are now willing to soften some of their stance to accommodate what some republicans want.

    excerpts:

    nytimes - editorial
    progress on immigration

    published: april 22, 2007

    "two important words to remember in the immigration debate in congress are "triggers" and "touchback." during last year's ill-fated wrangling, the terms made the supporters of comprehensive reform bristle. the first refers to tough border-security benchmarks that the nation would have to meet before other parts of reform would kick in. the second refers to the requirement that illegal immigrants leave the country-even if only touching down briefly over the border-before re-entering on a legal footing."

    "the good news is that in this year's debate, triggers and touchbacks have become potential areas of compromise. it remains true that maliciously devised triggers can be too onerous, but as the wall street journal reported, democrats are now saying that they are open to well-written trigger provisions, since that could give a bill broader support among republicans. reassuring americans that border security is improving is reasonable, as long as achieving the benchmarks is not the sole and ultimate aim. republican leaders, to their credit, have backed away from the narrow, enforcement-only approach that disgraced their efforts last year."

    click here for full article.
  6. by   gneb2x
    oh well, life must go on. whatever will be will be
  7. by   healthcpg
    If by July this year nothing happens, you can Kiss the Immigration issue Good Bye 'till 2009
  8. by   suzanne4
    Bush has already stated many times over that he expects to be signing something in August dealing with the CIR. However, no one knows what will exactly be in it when it makes it to his desk for signing.

    If they are just going to have more meetings again, it will take time for both sides to come to a single plan that is acceptable to all. Then and only then is it put before the President for signing.
  9. by   Gordon73
    From NY Times, one of the most serious sourses http://www.nytimes.com/2007/04/22/op...in&oref=slogin
  10. by   suzanne4
    And not one piece of concrete anything in that. Just the same things that we have been stating over and over here.
  11. by   karolina
    [ hello
    i know suzanne is on vacation,,maybe lawrence will be able to answer this quesion. i got married recently to american citizen, but i had already my papers field with the hospital, and it is in progress, i 140 is approved. shall i wait for retrogression to be lifted or file again from my husband/? hwo long would that take? i feel like it would be a waist of time to file it again, but i want to make sure ,,
    thanks
  12. by   Aquarian
  13. by   lawrence01
    Quote from karolina
    [ hello
    i know suzanne is on vacation,,maybe lawrence will be able to answer this quesion. i got married recently to american citizen, but i had already my papers field with the hospital, and it is in progress, i 140 is approved. shall i wait for retrogression to be lifted or file again from my husband/? hwo long would that take? i feel like it would be a waist of time to file it again, but i want to make sure ,,
    thanks
    You really need to consult a lawyer on this. There are many variables involve than you might not think would matter at the moment. It's in the details. Therefore, consulting a lawyer and giving him all the personal information pertaining to your case is important.

    Right now, one thing I can think of is how sure you are that your AOS would be approved? Approval of AOS is not automatic, esp. if filed in less than 60 days upon arrival and on Visitor's Visa. There's a possibility that it could be denied if filed that early and there are also reports that even those who filed within the 60-90 days range are still not guaranteed of AOS approval if there are other things found that would make them to deny the AOS petition. The details count.. so definitely consult a lawyer.
    Last edit by lawrence01 on Apr 24, '07

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