Unifying the Advanced Practice Roles - page 3

Although the APRN roles are distinct in their own right, this shouldn't mean that Advanced Practice should be fragmented as well. I want to suggest why not rename all the APRN roles, CRNA, NP, CNM... Read More

  1. Visit  PatMac10,RN profile page
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    Quote from futureeastcoastNP
    Yep, they could have 1,500 clinical hours (750 inpatient and 750 outpatient) and a few extra classes added to the FNP curriculum that goes more into acute care. Now that I think about it, though, there are some schools that have a sort of hybrid program like this, they call it "Emergency Nurse Practitioner" and it's essentially a combo of both the FNP and ACNP programs, allowing the graduate to be prepared in inpatient (ACNP) but also able to see all ages (FNP).
    Yea. My issue is more with those who want to specialize in one particular age population, Peds or Adult.

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  2. Visit  futureeastcoastNP profile page
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    Quote from PatMac10,RN
    Yea. My issue is more with those who want to specialize in one particular age population, Peds or Adult.

    Sent from my iPhone using allnurses.com
    Oh, I see what you're saying. I didn't even realize there was a separate pediatric acute care NP. That's kind of bizarre actually. They should definitely fuse that with PNP.
  3. Visit  PatMac10,RN profile page
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    Exactly!

    I can kind of understand why there may be a splitting of Neonatal and the rest of Pediatrics, but I still feel that it could be a specialty option for a acute and primary care educated Pediatric Nurse Practitioner. Maybe a PNP/ACPNP or NNP could weigh in on this?

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  4. Visit  SRNA4U profile page
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    As a soon to be CRNA, I would rather keep my future title versus taking on a generic NP title. The work we have undertaken in this specialty is tremendous and I think it's nice for each specialty to have their unique identifier. The demands of schooling for each profession deserves it's own certification title.
  5. Visit  WildcatFanRN profile page
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    A couple of programs are combining PNP and ACPNP, Drexel is one off the top of my head. It's new for them.
  6. Visit  xX Goose Xx profile page
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    Quote from futureeastcoastNP
    I don't like it either. These are distinct professions and while all nurses it's unfair to call everyone an NP. All of these professions have long, rich histories, especially the midwife and the nurse anesthetist. Upholding their name is an honor to all of those who have fought to give them the scope and rights they enjoy today, and it really shouldn't be changed. Second, it would be confusing. Nurse practitioners are supposed to be able to write prescriptions, yet CRNAs cannot. CNS cannot diagnose or write prescriptions in many states either. Calling them all NPs would be even more confusing and would lead to "Are you the kind of NP that can write prescriptions??" Physicians can all have the same title because no matter what the specialty, they were all trained the same and can all diagnose, order, and write prescriptions. That is not the case for the APRN roles. It makes no sense to give them the same name. I agree the alphabet soup is ridiculous and tacky but changing the name won't help that. How NPs put their name on their card is up to them, I intend to only write FNP.
    CRNAs can write prescriptions in some states. I have prescription privileges and DEA number.
  7. Visit  matthewandrew profile page
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    Quote from SRNA4U
    As a soon to be CRNA, I would rather keep my future title versus taking on a generic NP title. The work we have undertaken in this specialty is tremendous and I think it's nice for each specialty to have their unique identifier. The demands of schooling for each profession deserves it's own certification title.
    I understand each advanced practice role has it's own unique CERTIFICATION, but the purpose of the suggestion is to unify the APRN title. An MD can be a hospitalist, cardiologist, dermatologist, radiologist... etc etc etc. I'm talking about one singular professional title for all APRNs to distinguish themselves from not only RN, but to the professions as well, namely MD, PharmD, etc. This would all be easier if the minimum requirement for APRN was MSN or DNP... but that's a whole other thread...

    DNP, if it was the minimum for practice, would be the clear title to get rid of the "alphabet soup."
  8. Visit  elkpark profile page
    2
    Quote from matthewandrew
    I understand each advanced practice role has it's own unique CERTIFICATION, but the purpose of the suggestion is to unify the APRN title. An MD can be a hospitalist, cardiologist, dermatologist, radiologist... etc etc etc. I'm talking about one singular professional title for all APRNs to distinguish themselves from not only RN, but to the professions as well, namely MD, PharmD, etc.

    DNP, if it was the minimum for practice, would be the clear title to get rid of the "alphabet soup."
    MD and PharmD are both degrees, not titles. "Physician" is the correct, generic title for MDs. Like nursing, all physicians have an MD (or DO) degree, but not everyone with an MD degree is a licensed physician. All physicians are "physicians," and then they have some additional specialty that makes them a cardiologist, or anesthesiologist, etc. No one in the general public seems to have any difficulty grasping that concept. So, all advanced practice nurses are nurses, and then they are also CRNAs, or CNSs, or NPs, or CNMs. I grant you the general public is not (yet) as familiar with that concept as they are with how it works with physicians, but they're getting there, and I certainly don't see a reason to muddy the waters further by starting to switch the titles around.

    I will bet you a lot of money it will be a v. long time before a DNP is required for practice across all the advanced practice specialties. And, again, that is a degree, not a title. Even if it ever does become mandatory, there will still be many, many practicing advanced practice nurses with MSN preparation.
    SRNA4U and SHGR like this.
  9. Visit  manusko profile page
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    Quote from matthewandrew
    Although the APRN roles are distinct in their own right, this shouldn't mean that Advanced Practice should be fragmented as well. I want to suggest why not rename all the APRN roles, CRNA, NP, CNM and CNS into one singular term, Nurse Practitioner. CRNA = Anesthetic NP CNM = Obstetric NP CNS = Clinical Specialist NP NP = (Insert Specialty) NP NP is already very well known to the public. I think this would not only lessen confusion but improve the public image of Advanced Nursing. It would also unify all the roles, just like every other health profession. Why keep the alphabet soup in our profession (eg: RN BSN MSN CRNA CNM CNS DNP ETC ETC ETC)? Matthew Andrew, NP Another BOLD idea for our profession... thoughts?
    In the end it would be changing one alphabet soup for another. I prefer CRNA for myself. Nurse practitioners already have their multiple initials for their different disciplines and I believe they deserve to keep their titles without other advanced nursing disciplines taking away from their profession.
    elkpark and SRNA4U like this.


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