ACNP vs FNP: My Summarization of the Great Debate ACNP vs FNP: My Summarization of the Great Debate - pg.2 | allnurses

ACNP vs FNP: My Summarization of the Great Debate - page 2

I, like many others in the forum, have been recently struggling with which NP program to pursue - FNP or ACNP. I've read so many threads and talked with so many people (RNs, NPs, nurse recruiters,... Read More

  1. Visit  RNDNPstudent profile page
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    You can do a dual track FNP/ACNP ED focus which is about 88-90 credits or you can do FNP or ACNP then add on at end which will be about 3-4 semesters
  2. Visit  RNDNPstudent profile page
    0
    You can do a dual track FNP/ACNP ED focus which is about 88-90 credits or you can do FNP or ACNP then add on at end which will be about 3-4 semesters post. It depends on what school you are in though
  3. Visit  SopranoKris profile page
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    Just bumping this thread to see if there have been any changes.

    I've been debating on which path to follow. I really want to work ED/ICU as a NP when I'm done with school. At first, I was looking at a BSN to DNP program. After speaking with a few NPs at our hospital, all of them have said that I'd need to do ACNP and not FNP if I want to work in the hospital.

    There doesn't seem to be any general consensus on the "right" track to pursue when you search online. It seems to vary from state to state, even region to region.

    So far, I've found that my state (MI) prefers ACNP over FNP in the hospital setting. I plan to stay in the hospital setting and have no desire to work in private practice, so I'm researching ACNP programs. In the mean time, I'm working on my ECCO & ACLS certifications for my new critical care job.

    Anyone else have any input into ACNP vs. FNP?
  4. Visit  Dranger profile page
    2
    Quote from SopranoKris
    Just bumping this thread to see if there have been any changes.

    I've been debating on which path to follow. I really want to work ED/ICU as a NP when I'm done with school. At first, I was looking at a BSN to DNP program. After speaking with a few NPs at our hospital, all of them have said that I'd need to do ACNP and not FNP if I want to work in the hospital.

    There doesn't seem to be any general consensus on the "right" track to pursue when you search online. It seems to vary from state to state, even region to region.

    So far, I've found that my state (MI) prefers ACNP over FNP in the hospital setting. I plan to stay in the hospital setting and have no desire to work in private practice, so I'm researching ACNP programs. In the mean time, I'm working on my ECCO & ACLS certifications for my new critical care job.

    Anyone else have any input into ACNP vs. FNP?
    Without droning on into a long discussion regarding ACNP vs FNP, I think you are on the right track. The only problematic area for you would be the ED. Either you are going to need to get a FNP cert to see kids or focus on the ICU where ACNPs thrive.

    While the FNP specialty is obviously the most marketable, it is not the end all be all for NPs and all of the field intertwined within the profession. Otherwise why would we even have other specialties?

    For someone set on inpatient and critical care, ACNP is the most definite way to go.
    BCgradnurse and Rjoshi19 like this.
  5. Visit  mzaur profile page
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    I've heard of hospitals forcing FNP/AGNPs to go back and get ACNP cert. If you want to work in ICU/ED then go for ACNP. If you want to work in primary care then go for FNP.
  6. Visit  favthing profile page
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    The Consensus Model is really clear about the intent of ACNP for in-patient. The NP on the unit where I work is an AGNP-prepared NP. Otherwise, I see a lot of Clinical Nurse Specialists, but few NPs at the hospital where I work. There a more PAs in the traditional clinical roles. A lot of ACNP programs consider only critical care experience as an entrance requirement, so this limits a lot of potential students. I applied for two ACNP programs, both which do not require the two-year critical care experience that I often see, but I will see. I anticipate that I will do a AGNP and the post-grad program for ACNP.
  7. Visit  twozer0 profile page
    0
    Quote from favthing
    The Consensus Model is really clear about the intent of ACNP for in-patient. The NP on the unit where I work is an AGNP-prepared NP. Otherwise, I see a lot of Clinical Nurse Specialists, but few NPs at the hospital where I work. There a more PAs in the traditional clinical roles. A lot of ACNP programs consider only critical care experience as an entrance requirement, so this limits a lot of potential students. I applied for two ACNP programs, both which do not require the two-year critical care experience that I often see, but I will see. I anticipate that I will do a AGNP and the post-grad program for ACNP.
    Just to be clear, there are several states who arent even close to implementing the consensus model. Those states you will often see overlap between NP roles in different settings. You will likely continue to see this for the years to come as well. https://www.ncsbn.org/5397.htm

    Also, the big caveat here is in the actual model itself "scope of practice of the primary care or the acute care CNP is Not Setting Specific but is based on patient care needs" (https://www.ncsbn.org/Consensus_Mode..._July_2008.pdf).

    The model itself is pretty clear that patient care needs come first. If the patient is an inpatient or an outpatient, it does not matter as long as the care needs are the priority. This is why you will see ACNP in outpatient (although less likely) and FNP's doing inpatient. Of course an FNP will not be managing a patient in the ICU like an ACNP might, what you will see is a continuation of care from the outpatient setting that transitions to inpatient (hospitalist, specialst group). This squabble about who is better shouldnt even exist as both roles have a purpose and that is to provide the patient with care, the setting is just a location to practice.
    Last edit by twozer0 on Jan 26 : Reason: added map link
  8. Visit  favthing profile page
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    Exactly, it is about patient-centered appropriate care. Just as the medical model of specialization targets specific populations for physicians, NP preparation is trying to target training according to patient population. Lol, the lingo is so funny here, as in-patient vs out-patient generally does dictate level of acuity, but it seems when professional nursing attempts to improve educational preparation in response to changing times is always attacked with petty hang-ups. Thanks for the reminder.

    Nobody here is saying Primary or Acute is better. Myself, I am trying to decide upon the best preparation for my targeted interest, which is sub-acute care. The medical director of the program where I hope to one day be a NP said they are trying to hire Acute NPs, as he even brought up the consensus model and the acuity of patients, etc. And simply that.
  9. Visit  ghillbert profile page
    0
    Quote from ChristineN
    PA recently changed their nurse practice act so that FNP's can not work in an in patient setting and are requiring ACNP or PACNP to work in the hospital setting.
    Source for this? I practice in PA and haven't heard anything like that.

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