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Would You Report Me for This?

Nurses   (41,302 Views | 211 Replies)

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TheCommuter has 10 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Case mgmt., rehab, (CRRN), LTC & psych.

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Hopefully the OP will return in a timely manner with more thoughts on this issue, especially in light of the illuminating feedback and responses received thus far.

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Tex. specializes in Critical Care.

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A pill is a pill is a pill. It shouldn't matter if it is a stool softener or a Norco. Watch her take it, or take it back to try again later. If she doesn't take it right away when you offer it again, then it should be recorded as a refusal. Cover your ***. Protect your yourself.

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heron has 40 years experience as a ASN, RN and specializes in Hospice.

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Well, since the OP mentioned needing to get through a large medpass quickly and that it included giving crushed meds via g-tube, I think it's reasonable to assume that the OP is not talking about outpatient, home care or assisted living. We also know there were visitors present, since the OP mentioned that it was another resident's visitor that reported her.

Did you know that one of the more common - and lethal - causes of childhood poisoning is Nanna's blood pressure pills? A small enough child with severe diarrhea or vomiting can be in real trouble in less than four hours.

I agree that some safety rules and policies we get stuck with are pretty laughable, but this isn't one of them. None of the chemicals we feed people are totally innocuous. Being sure that you are feeding a given chemical to the person who needs it and no one else seems pretty basic, to me.

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NanikRN specializes in Oncology, Rehab, Public Health, Med Surg.

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I don't think your DON had a choice to not write you up. A family member came to her/him with a complaint that was clearly not best practice Are you the only one that does it? Probably not.

But you got caught... By a family member( and it sounds like an unfriendly one, at that) :(

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Well, since the OP mentioned needing to get through a large medpass quickly and that it included giving crushed meds via g-tube, I think it's reasonable to assume that the OP is not talking about outpatient, home care or assisted living. We also know there were visitors present, since the OP mentioned that it was another resident's visitor that reported her.

It was LTC. In the dining room, at the dinner table.

Did you know that one of the more common - and lethal - causes of childhood poisoning is Nanna's blood pressure pills? A small enough child with severe diarrhea or vomiting can be in real trouble in less than four hours.

It wasn't Nanna's blood pressure pill. It was a Senokot.

Again, I agree that it wasn't wise, but I think disciplinary action is overkill, unless this nurse has a pattern that needs to be addressed.

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heron has 40 years experience as a ASN, RN and specializes in Hospice.

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I can think of any number of "typical" ltc residents or visitors who could be harmed by taking a senekot they don't need.

I've already said I probably wouldn't write it up. What I disagree with is encouraging the OP to consider it a trivial bit of micromanagement gone mad. It isn't trivial and I'm glad the OP had the sense to find out what all the fuss is about.

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I never said it was trivial. Again, I think counseling is in order, but I would not write up the poster unless this is part of an ongoing pattern that needs to be addressed. I think we agree more than we disagree.

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Tex. specializes in Critical Care.

232 Posts; 4,317 Profile Views

Well, since the OP mentioned needing to get through a large medpass quickly and that it included giving crushed meds via g-tube, I think it's reasonable to assume that the OP is not talking about outpatient, home care or assisted living. We also know there were visitors present, since the OP mentioned that it was another resident's visitor that reported her.

Did you know that one of the more common - and lethal - causes of childhood poisoning is Nanna's blood pressure pills? A small enough child with severe diarrhea or vomiting can be in real trouble in less than four hours.

I agree that some safety rules and policies we get stuck with are pretty laughable, but this isn't one of them. None of the chemicals we feed people are totally innocuous. Being sure that you are feeding a given chemical to the person who needs it and no one else seems pretty basic, to me.

I think it's entirely plausible that she could be in an assisted living facility, and not likely that there are children around. However, I agree that there are safety rules in place for a reason, and we should follow them.

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flyersfan88 specializes in Trauma, Orthopedics.

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Again, I agree that it wasn't wise, but I think disciplinary action is overkill, unless this nurse has a pattern that needs to be addressed.

Based on the OP's non-chalant attitude since the resident, ya know, totally takes their pills all the time, who knows where the line is drawn in what gets watched and what doesn't.

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SubSippi has 2 years experience.

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I can see how this could be confusing for a new nurse, because we are taught to do things a certain way in nursing school, then we get out in the real world and see rules being broken left and right.

Like someone else said, experience will tell you which rules you can break. In my opinion, the real lesson here is that you should always go strictly by the book if someone a family member or manager is around. Your manager HAD to do something because a visitor saw you breaking the rules.

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3 Articles; 2,815 Posts; 30,508 Profile Views

Based on the OP's non-chalant attitude since the resident, ya know, totally takes their pills all the time, who knows where the line is drawn in what gets watched and what doesn't.

Maybe this resident does always take her pills. There isn't enough information to decide whether the OP's attitude is nonchalant or reasonable. Honestly, the family member sounds like a bit of a pill, but I do agree the OP could have handled the situation more professionally- and deserves counseling to that effect. But I'm not ready to believe there is a pattern of negligence here that requires a formal disciplinary action.

Also, I want to address this statement:

It is not within the scope of practice for an aide to ensure medication administration.

This isn't totally accurate. In some settings, CNAs can witness self-administration of medications. Home health aides do this all the time. They're not technically administering the medication, but simply reminding the client to take their medications and witnessing them doing so. I'm not certain that this situation was so terribly different.

Edited by Anna Flaxis

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twinmommy+2 is a ADN, BSN and specializes in ED.

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I never said it was trivial. Again, I think counseling is in order, but I would not write up the poster unless this is part of an ongoing pattern that needs to be addressed. I think we agree more than we disagree.

But an ongoing pattern won't be established without the papertrail.

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