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Why do so many nursing homes fire CNAs all the time?

Posted

I've worked at a few nursing homes and they all had a history of firing the CNAs routinely, there were very few aides who had been there for a very long time. I remember the first time I got hired at LTC, an employee who had been there for 9 months warned me about how the place fired CNAs almost in droves, and that I probably won't be around much longer.

She was right.

This is one of the reasons why I have strayed away from nursing homes and tried Homehealth. The only downside is that you may not always get consistent hourly work, but as long as you always show up to duty, you can stay employed a lot longer than at a nursing home.

chevyv, BSN, RN

Specializes in Gero Psych, Ortho Rebab, LTC, Psych. Has 20 years experience.

I can't believe it! Where I work they would love to hold onto CNA's! I just figure they quit because the assignment is way too heavy. Not that I blame them at all for leaving. I would love to see 3 cna's for 28 pts along with a lpn and med tech for half the shift!

Where do you live chevyv?

I've worked at 2 LTC facilities. The first one, we got a new administrator, and she went on a sweep firing several caregivers. One of the former employees claimed that she was called into the office and told "I won't be needing your services anymore". She was not given a legitimate reason at all. Currently, there is a whole new staff of people. I noticed this happens when a new adminitrator is put into office, they start to terminate employees they didnt hire and replace them with new staff.

At another nursing home, one of the charge nurses said she would fire CNAs she simply didn't like.

I noticed this is quite common where I am from, therefore I stray away from them. It's like walking on eggshells.

chevyv, BSN, RN

Specializes in Gero Psych, Ortho Rebab, LTC, Psych. Has 20 years experience.

I live in Wisconsin. A few weeks ago I saw 11 postings for CNA'a alone! I should mention that we only can have 100 residents!! They filled every position and had a big welcome board by the time clock with all the names on it (I didn't get that when they hired me on as lpn). I suspect that over the next 4 weeks, we will lose a few of those newbies. They must really pile on the work.

THere are a lot of firings where I am too. I also see the 'friends of the new regime' thing here too. And picking out people to force out or fire. It sucks. But one girl who was fired a few weeks ago got another job the same day, so it isn't the end of the world. But it is a very unnecessarily stressful way to live. And I'm not liking this part of the job AT ALL!

greeniebean

Specializes in Alzheimers and geriatric patients. Has 12 years experience.

OMG! My LTC won't fire you for anything. In the past year they fired 1 girl who had worked there 10 months. THis girl was 30 minutes late everyday, got caught red handed stealing $10 from a resident, was accused of abuse by 2 residents, and got in trouble repeatedly for not giving baths! She finally got "fired" when she didn't show up for a week and never called in or anything. I think it was pretty clear she had quit but they marked her as terminated.

We have so many girls now who are no call no shows, who provide the worst care to the residents, and who have major attitudes!But they still wont fire anyone. I guess they know how hard it is to get people to stay at the job so anyone is better than no one at all!

I don't work at a nursing home, but I've heard the stories. In college I did an internship at a nursing home and the assistant administrator hired a young lady who didn't even have a GED. The assistant adm. said she didn't care because the facility needed the help, yet I overheard her complain about how these new CNA's don't stay long.

MichaelCNA

Specializes in CNA: LTC.

This is something that is difficult to generalize. Were those that were terminated still pending their 90 day probationary period? Perhaps they had attendance issues, prior suspensions, Resident/Family complaints, that contributed to the loss of their position. At my place of employment, it is quite easy to get written up, but for serious measures or for tasks that cannot be overlooked, meaning all CNA tasks are important, we are dealing with human lives here.

Valerie Salva, BSN, RN

Has 19 years experience.

Most of the LTCs where I've worked never fire anybody no matter how bad they are.

yousoldtheworld

Has 5 years experience.

I've worked places that never fire ANYBODY (except in extreme cases, like abuse) and I've worked places that fire at the drop of the hat. Neither are good.

On one hand, it sucks to work with people who never do their jobs, barely take care of the residents, and still keep their jobs.

At the same time, it sucks to constantly be worried about losing your job - because, even if you're a wonderful CNA, we're all human, and sometimes, we forget things, or we get busy and don't get to things as soon as we'd like to. Where I'm working now, people have been fired for taking too long to answer a call light (and at night, these residents are on their lights CONSTANTLY and there are only three of us working in the whole place. You just can't be everywhere at the same time) and for people being wet when day shift comes in (our last rounds are at 3:15, we start getting people up at 5. Inevitably, some people are going to be incontinent in that time, and if they expect us to get all of our getups dressed and our showers done, there is no time to check everyone again).

If only places could settle on a happy medium. People should be made aware of and disciplined for poor performance, but expectations should be realistic, as well.

ashleypoo22

Specializes in LTC, Hospital, SNF, Home Health, Agency.

At my old facility, the main reason for firing the aides is because they were always late or called in a lot. But I found some others... transferring without a gaitbelt will get you canned...even if no one knows about it, the resident will tell their family or other staff. That's why it's always good to have 2 people in the room at the same time, no matter what. I've seen residents lie and say they have fallen, been on the call light for an hour, and no one came to help. Or they would simply say they fell...then go on to tell another resident, staff, or family...when it really didn't happen. One place I worked at wanted briefs off at night... when I started working somewhere else I left them off, which later I found out that wasn't their policy...and they didn't like that I did that. There are endless reasons, big and small. Eating a cracker off the snack cart would probably get you fired in some places. It depends on who runs the show.

Edited by ashleypoo22
added info

fuzzywuzzy, CNA

Specializes in LTC. Has 3 years experience.

Yeah... if they don't like you they can easily find SOME reason to fire you.

asun21ta

Specializes in LTC, Home Health. Has 5 years experience.

I have found that most times when someone is fired, it's someone who's been on the radar already for a while. There was a CNA who worked at my LTB who's CNA Certification had been revoked for "abuse of a resident" several months prior from another facility. (Seems human resources didn't properly verify her information when they hired her). She worked there for 4 months before the LTC fired her for it. The only reason she was fired was because the state was coming for their annual inspection, so the administrators go through Employee files before the state gets there. When they checked their records, it was then they found out so they had to fire her right on the spot. They would have been in serious trouble if the state auditor found it first!

It's hard at some places to get fired, one facility I worked for had CNA's who would arrive 2-3 hours late on a regular basis! Some even refused to wear uniforms and arrived in regular clothes. They still were not fired!

I Have also worked at a facility where CNA's where about at dispensable as a can of soda. This place also trained CNA's so there were always trainees to replace the CNA's they frequently fired. CNA's would be fired for anything and everything you could imagine. Something as silly as someone's call light being on to long! I know of a Nurse at this place who arrive's to work drunk and she never gets fired for it! :down:

Edited by asun21ta

In my opinion they don't fire people enough. Nothing irks me more than when they refuse to get rid of sorry aides.

It gets even worse because while the new age nurse leaders want to 're-mediate' people and 'educate' them they get more brazen because they know they get away with it.

As far as I'm concerned, if they fired MORE sorry employees there would be room for more good ones and the marginal ones might get their act together.

I have been a cna for 13 years and i enjoy it

I have worked in nursing home and its all the same you are treated

like your bum and your no good

your expected to do it all

baths,changing,dressing,feeding,naps,

and the whole time some people are sitting down making

sure they are looking busey haha

and then when cna ask for help its noted they are keeping up with the

job duties. i have worked in many nursing homes and its like the patients are swing beef

and there not they are human just like we are

they are the people who made the world for us

and there is no reason for them to be treated the way they are I would get so mad

so i had to give up working in nursing homes because of that reason

i have been working in a open heart icu setting for 4 years and its great

cna's here do ekg,vs,op,cpr,help in the O.R if someone goes back, blood sugar test, I have also helped out in the burn room. we are all one big family and we treat eachother with respect

its not always peaches and cream but at the end of the night its good to hear good job and thank you for your help

I dont care what letters come after your name respect is the main key

and they all need to keep in mind C(cna) comes befor Dr,RN,LPN,PA:nmbrn:and with a little respect we could be their right arm

even our boss is great she jokes around with us and understand if you have a sick kid at home or if you just needed a day off

and tell me how many of you have a Dr send a card to your house because your sister just lost her son and he just wanted to say he was sorry to hear the news and was thinking of all of us

I must say i was shocked but it was a great feeling to know he cared

so to all of you there are better jobs out there you just need to find it

:redpinkhe:redbeathe:heartbeat

Edited by Confused C.N.A

I've worked at a few nursing homes and they all had a history of firing the CNAs routinely, there were very few aides who had been there for a very long time. I remember the first time I got hired at LTC, an employee who had been there for 9 months warned me about how the place fired CNAs almost in droves, and that I probably won't be around much longer.

She was right.

This is one of the reasons why I have strayed away from nursing homes and tried Homehealth. The only downside is that you may not always get consistent hourly work, but as long as you always show up to duty, you can stay employed a lot longer than at a nursing home.

As some who is considering relocating to several different places I would love to know which city you live in where the nursing homes have a habit of firing aides easily. I guess in a big metro area where there are more applicants aides are considered to be more dispensable than they might be in smaller places.

Butterfliesnroses

Specializes in LTC.

Where I work you have to do quite a bit to get fired. I think it mainly has to do with being short on aides. However right now there is an influx of applicants so my boss seems to be as worried about losing aides and nurses alike.

In my opinion they don't fire people enough. Nothing irks me more than when they refuse to get rid of sorry aides.

It gets even worse because while the new age nurse leaders want to 're-mediate' people and 'educate' them they get more brazen because they know they get away with it.

As far as I'm concerned, if they fired MORE sorry employees there would be room for more good ones and the marginal ones might get their act together.

I agree there are many aides who don't take their jobs seriously. I recently had a co-worker react with outrage because I politely suggested that - since her car was unreliable - she put $20 a week aside as cab fare for those days when her car broke down so she wouldn't have to call out. Her attitude was "Why should I have pay to get to work if my car won't start? How can they expect me to come to work if I'm having car trouble?" Meanwhile I've worked with people who leave their houses two hours early to get to work on time because they have to catch a bus. Usually it takes more than one bus and they are still never late...but maybe thats more of a cultural/class issue than a nurses aide issue.

On the other hand, the way many LTC facilities are run its no surprise that there are aides who want to do better but can't because there isn't enough time/help/resources. There is a difference between aides who can't do their tasks because too much is expected of them and aides who are constant late/absentees and/or have bad attitudes. Its bad for morale to keep staff afraid for their jobs because they might get fired the next time they can't get to a call light on time. There is no way I would work in a place like that.

Edited by Miwila

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