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Why we can't administer insulin near umbilicus?

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by Pink68 Pink68 (New) New

[h=1]What Is The Problem With Injecting Too Close to the Navel?[/h]

Okami_CCRN, ADN, RN

Specializes in Critical Care. Has 4 years experience.

The tissue surrounding the umbilicus (around 2 inches) is considered scar tissue from birth. Thus the absorption of medication is negligible.

KatieMI, BSN, MSN, RN

Specializes in ICU, LTACH, Internal Medicine. Has 8 years experience.

Or, alternatively, there is a group of veins near umbilicus which is directly connected with vena porta. The veins sit within these 2 inches around umbilicus, and accidental injection in any of them = insulin IV effect, with crushing hypoglycemia.

TheCommuter, BSN, RN

Specializes in Case mgmt., rehab, (CRRN), LTC & psych. Has 15 years experience.

FYI, it's not just insulin that cannot be injected too close to the navel area. It's all types of medications such as Lovenox, Forteo, etc.

The umbilicus is not the appropriate injection site for any injectable medication.

Do you know the reason why? We all learn we can't administer medication near the umbilicus, but I can't find anywhere the rationale. Thank you.

TheCommuter, BSN, RN

Specializes in Case mgmt., rehab, (CRRN), LTC & psych. Has 15 years experience.

Do you know the reason why? We all learn we can't administer medication near the umbilicus, but I can't find anywhere the rationale. Thank you.
The first two different members who previously posted to this thread provided excellent rationales as to why medications cannot be administered too close to the umbilical region.

BuckyBadgerRN, ASN, RN

Specializes in HH, Peds, Rehab, Clinical. Has 4 years experience.

Homework? What does your instructor tell you?

What Is The Problem With Injecting Too Close to the Navel?

It's not homework, I'm not in school. The question was asked because like I mentioned previously, we are all taught not to, but even in nursing books an explanation is not given.

abbnurse

Has 29 years experience.

It's not homework, I'm not in school. The question was asked because like I mentioned previously, we are all taught not to, but even in nursing books an explanation is not given.

KatieMI's post above (post #2).....that was the rationale I learned in nursing school.

LadyFree28, BSN, RN

Specializes in Pediatrics, Rehab, Trauma. Has 10 years experience.

It's not homework, I'm not in school. The question was asked because like I mentioned previously, we are all taught not to, but even in nursing books an explanation is not given.

Nursing books will not give you a rationale, because, it's implied that one would understand A&P, and use that as a springboard to understand landmarks for injections sites and discern what is appropriate.

They give rationales for everything else, so why not for this.

LadyFree28, BSN, RN

Specializes in Pediatrics, Rehab, Trauma. Has 10 years experience.

They give rationales for everything else, so why not for this.

Why should they when one is aware of A&P?

Ok this discussion is not about knowing or not knowing A&P. In nursing everything we are told to do or not to do there is always a rationale behind it. If it was as simple as knowing A&P then we won't go to nursing school. Anyway, I wish not to continue this argument regarding knowing A&P or not. I'm pretty sure others might have had this same question. Thank you Okami and KatieMI for your answers, I really appreciated it and my question is answered.

LadyFree28, BSN, RN

Specializes in Pediatrics, Rehab, Trauma. Has 10 years experience.

Ok this discussion is not about knowing or not knowing A&P. In nursing everything we are told to do or not to do there is always a rationale behind it. If it was as simple as knowing A&P then we won't go to nursing school. Anyway, I wish not to continue this argument regarding knowing A&P or not. I'm pretty sure others might have had this same question.

My point is: most of what we learned in nursing school is the building blocks to what is to come; most of our knowledge is derived from other sources, how've things that aren't covered as to rationale is more simple as to fundamental knowledge, such as A&P.

Nursing rationale, to my understanding, is the requirement of the reasoning behind the nursing process; meaning based on diagnoses, and plan, our rationale is based on the knowledge that is derived from sources of our fundamentals-A&P, Psych (into, developmental, and abnormal, chemistry) theoretical sources, research and the like, to determine WHAT would be the best option.

My viewpoint was to infer since you had the answers given previously, that most critical thinking, in terms of nursing judgement, are derived a lot of times from the most basic of sources, and that is within whatever source is appropriate, hence the referral to A&P, since it seems led you weren't clear from the previous sources.

Best wishes.

Edited by LadyFree28