Jump to content

When should you start looking into a job as a new grad?

Posted

How early is to early? I don't want the recruiters to look at me and say "hey you still have two semesters left let's not jump the gun here". I have a few hospitals I'm interested in speaking with and will be in the state I am wanting to relocate to next month. I didn't know if I should try and call some of them and set up appointments to speak with them about their facility, etc. So many of my friends that have already graduated didn't even start looking for a position until after that had graduated and passed their NCLEX. Input please????

How early is to early? I don't want the recruiters to look at me and say "hey you still have two semesters left let's not jump the gun here". I have a few hospitals I'm interested in speaking with and will be in the state I am wanting to relocate to next month. I didn't know if I should try and call some of them and set up appointments to speak with them about their facility, etc. So many of my friends that have already graduated didn't even start looking for a position until after that had graduated and passed their NCLEX. Input please????

Can you possibly work as a tech or a CNA part time while in school? Then your foot is already in the door and to be honest you'll learn a lot. I know so many nurses myself included that am so happy I worked as a tech before graduating.

You are DEFINATELY not too early.

When I had two semesters left, I looked into a few hospitals, and I ended up getting a CNA/Student nurse worker job there (which I highly recommend doing). There is no nursing shortage, so its not like you need to find a job, but if you plan on working somewhere OTHER than med-surg, start looking now.

You are more likely to get your choice of unit/floor if you are already an employee and have developed rapport with the staff there. (Kind of like getting your foot in the door, putting your name out there, etc.) They figure you know the hospital, the paperwork, the staff, and you have been trained already for the general hospital part. Plus, working as a tech/CNA will help you in clinical, and on your tests. It will also get you used to the 12 hour shifts, and you will find out what floor/area you like best. Especially if they offer any sort of float job where you work in different areas of the hospital. Doing this also will let you know if you even really like the hospital!! Working there with the staff and just visiting are very different.

If for some reason you can't be a tech/CNA at the hospital, go now and start setting up appointments to talk with recruiters. You will get info about all of their new grad programs, their benefits, of course the $$$, and most will give you a tour of the hospital and let YOU interview staff to ask them about how they like it. This will give you a better feel for the hospital than what you have now.

I graduate in December, and I started actually interviewing for an RN job in September, and I will start there straight out of nursing school in the PICU. It is recommended you get interviews set up and finished before you are done with nursing school.

Good luck!!! You can never be too early, and recruiters are MORE than happy to try and get you interested in their hospital. Just remember that the $$ part may change slightly (for the better) by the time you graduate.

No I can't work there as a tech because it is in another state about 600 miles from where I'm currently living. I am just more interested in knowing if recruiters would even speak with me this early in the game.

Most hospitals have websites to check out. You can even look at job postings. With the job market for nurses the way it is I don't think you'll have a problem doing whatever you want.

I graduated last May. The hospitals in my area encouraged students to apply early (like around Christmas break) especially if you were interested in a specifiic specialty. The hospitals are flooded with apps at graduation time because everyone needs a job now.

I had several people in my class who wanted to start off in ICU - the majority of them had ICU jobs lined up by Feb-March. Of course, I did the exact opposite :rolleyes: - I waited til after graduation to look for work but then I was pretty confident I had a job lined up at my work. Wishing you the best of luck :)

I do recruitment. Like voting, you should apply soon and often (just kidding). I recommend applying 3-6 months BEFORE you graduate, then email the recruiter once a month to check on your status, especially when it gets down to 2 months before graduation. We are planning our GN orientation now and need to get a grip on how many spots to hold for them. Some spots cannot wait 2-3 months before being filled. Some grads insist on certain areas to work in. So the more info we have the better we can serve the new grads.

Agree with what everyone else is saying. I graduate in December and began checking around in April (8 months out). The particular hospital I was looking at indicated to me that even this early date was not too early. I started making serious inquiries around the end of July/beginning of August and interviewed and accepted a position in August. So this was 4 months away. Good luck and don't wait, especially if you want a particular area/specialty.

This isn't directly related to your question, but as one who learned the hard way, keep in mind that the hospitals with the biggest ads and bonuses are many times the most desperate for nurses, and not good places to work. The ones that don't advertise are the ones to talk to first. And no, you can't start too early. If you are interested in a hospital, show up on the evening shift and approach nurses and ask what they think about working there.

Thank you. You all have been very informative.

I guess i have a different opinon on this....I graduated in May and did not interview until late august, after i passed the NCLEX. I took a nice long break to take three vacations, study and spend time with my son. THe friends of mine who started right out of school are now regretful that they did not take a break and are feeling burnt out.

I got the exact position i wanted and on my time...maybe i was lucky....but i like to think its fate.

:) good luck to you!

This isn't directly related to your question, but as one who learned the hard way, keep in mind that the hospitals with the biggest ads and bonuses are many times the most desperate for nurses, and not good places to work. The ones that don't advertise are the ones to talk to first. And no, you can't start too early. If you are interested in a hospital, show up on the evening shift and approach nurses and ask what they think about working there.

I definately agree with you. There is a reason why they are offering huge sign on bonuses (b/c the work environment sucks!) I have looked into 3 hospitals with sign on bonuses, and instead chose the one w/o a bonus...

If you are interested in a hospital, show up on the evening shift and approach nurses and ask what they think about working there.

I work evening shift - I'm not sure how I would react to someone approaching me out of the blue asking questions about whether I liked my job. They'd have to catch me in the parking lot as I work on a locked unit - so I'd probably run! :rotfl:

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.