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What's Boston like?

Massachusetts   (6,284 Views 27 Comments)
by MovingRN MovingRN (Member)

MovingRN has 4 years experience and specializes in Postpartum/WBN.

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Hey there! I am a RN currently living in Columbia, MO but my boyfriend and I are looking to move elsewhere once he graduates from grad school in May 2008. We are looking to live somewhere more exciting--close to a bigger city, more things to do, etc. We don't care much for nightlife, but other things that a bigger city can offer--new restaurants, areas to explore, people watching, etc. We are looking at California (mostly because of the nicer weather) but also the Boston area. Just wondering what anyone can tell me they like about Boston, since I've never been (we are thinking of making a trip there soon). We're most worried about where we would live, as living in a city is obviously more expensive than the midwest. We are okay with commuting up to 45minutes for work, but not more than that. We're used to living in houses or duplexes and we're not sure we could adjust to apartments and high rises. Any suburban areas that are decent to live in?

Anything you could tell me about Boston would be great--guidebooks usually just give reviews of restaurants and hotels, not what it would be like to actually live there!

Thanks,

Vanessa

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I have been in Boston for about 11 years now. I was set to move when I got accepted into an LPN program...and so stayed to complete my education.

This is what I can tell you about Boston: Yes its nice...but SUPER expensive. Rent is insane...depending on where you live. The "norm" for rent is about 1000+ and there is no guarantee of what your going to be living in. Sure you can find areas that are cheaper...but its not always the best fo areas.

The "T" (train) isnt that great. Unlike NYC..there are no dirct routes from place ot place...sometimes you have to go around a big square and connect to other trains just to get to the center. Its crazy.

You can commute in...and 45 mins is ideal...but its not ideal when your sitting in bumper to bumper traffic and what can normally take 45 minutes ot commute in...takes 1.5 hours. Then you have to park.

Yes there are things to do here in the city. But I woud rather suggets living/working way outside the city. If you want to come here for the day then you drive in, take the train, etc. If you choose to live here...well thre is alot to deal with, alot of money to pay out, etc....

Im moving out of Boston because its just way to expensive. I cant get ahead here.

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Bill E. Rubin has 7 years experience and specializes in Neuro, Cardiology, ICU, Med/Surg.

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Just for some balance, I thought I'd chime in with my opinion. There's no doubt that Boston is an expensive place to live, but if you like to live in a city like this, other locations with similar cultural amenities are equally or more expensive (New York, San Francisco, anyone?). While neighborhoods like the Back Bay and Beacon Hill are beautiful, if you are willing to search for urban locales that are a bit funkier, you can find more affordable housing without extreme commutes (I live in Roslindale, a neighborhood of Boston about seven miles from downtown and a 1/2 hour bicycle ride to Mass. General... even shorter to BWH or BIDMC -- and the T really isn't bad, though it's not 24 hour like NYC). If you're interested in being around the most cutting edge medical research, you really can't do better than the major Boston hospitals.

I've lived here for around 22 years, and I can't imagine living anywhere else.

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vashtee is a RN and specializes in DOU.

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Boston is a beautiful city! But, like any city, it is expensive to live downtown. Live in a suburb instead.

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Bill E. Rubin has 7 years experience and specializes in Neuro, Cardiology, ICU, Med/Surg.

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Actually the suburbs near the city tend to be more expensive than some of the neighborhoods in the city like Roslindale (where I live) or other pretty safe neighborhoods like Allston/Brighton or Hyde Park. Jamaica Plain used to be affordable, but it's gotten pretty pricey (here in Roslindale, we're the "next Jamaica Plain"). Also, Somerville, a city next to Cambridge has some relatively affordable places to live, though the Davis Square area has gotten pretty expensive. All of these are within access to quick public transportation to the major hospitals. For the adventurous, Dorchester gets a bad rap, but it's actually the largest neighborhood in the city and has some nice parts that are quite affordable (by Boston's standards)... but there are some crime-ridden areas of Dorchester too, so you probably don't want to move there at first until you get to know the city better. If you fancy leafier suburbs, you might have to go a fair distance outside the city to find affordability as the desirable suburbs just outside the city tend to be very expensive.

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NurseKatie08 has 11 years experience as a MSN and specializes in Geriatrics, Transplant, Education.

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Actually the suburbs near the city tend to be more expensive than some of the neighborhoods in the city like Roslindale (where I live) or other pretty safe neighborhoods like Allston/Brighton or Hyde Park. Jamaica Plain used to be affordable, but it's gotten pretty pricey (here in Roslindale, we're the "next Jamaica Plain"). Also, Somerville, a city next to Cambridge has some relatively affordable places to live, though the Davis Square area has gotten pretty expensive. All of these are within access to quick public transportation to the major hospitals. For the adventurous, Dorchester gets a bad rap, but it's actually the largest neighborhood in the city and has some nice parts that are quite affordable (by Boston's standards)... but there are some crime-ridden areas of Dorchester too, so you probably don't want to move there at first until you get to know the city better. If you fancy leafier suburbs, you might have to go a fair distance outside the city to find affordability as the desirable suburbs just outside the city tend to be very expensive.

It's so funny to see someone describing Boston--Hyde Park born & raised here :nurse:

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in good consciousness, i couldn't recommend anyone moving to boston/gtr boston.

it's a tough job market for new grads and the cost of living is high.

i live in rozzie, but own my house.

i do know that it's a buyer's market now but have no idea as to if rents have gone down.

houses that were $300k a year ago, are now in the mid 200's.

even in west roxbury, houses are much less expensive.

i would venture to say that hyde park's rents may be a bit less, although it is up and coming.

i hear brighton/allston are outrageous as well.

i think the T is just fine.

buses run all the time as do the trains.

and, there's the commuter rail as well...very convenient.

depending on when your commute is, traveling 45 minutes will get you to suburban hospitals, which pay less.

come to think of it, weymouth, braintree would be less expensive places to live and are accessible to all major highways, as well as public transportation.

(never thought of those areas)

best of luck.

despite its expenses, i couldn't imagine living anywhere else.

leslie

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I just came back from NYC.....I use to live there originally from London...and boy was I glad to get back to Beantown:D After riding their train system...I really appreciated ours. In NYC I had to go up and down upteen different platforms to get to the one that I needed, maybe it was the directions I got from the personel:uhoh3: However like as mentioned Boston is expensive and the nursing market for new grads is horrendous.........that being said be prepared for that...have a solid resume and go to the hospitals in person....let them see your face not a resume......go from there ...I was offered several positions but due to shifts conflict..I went out of Boston for my new grad job into the suburbs and got a shift I wanted...that is another option.:D

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txspadequeenRN has 20 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in ICU, PICC Nurse, Nursing Supervisor.

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not trying to crash your thread but after reading all this i appreciate the dallas /ft worth metroplex

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NurseKatie08 has 11 years experience as a MSN and specializes in Geriatrics, Transplant, Education.

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in good consciousness, i couldn't recommend anyone moving to boston/gtr boston.

it's a tough job market for new grads and the cost of living is high.

i live in rozzie, but own my house.

i do know that it's a buyer's market now but have no idea as to if rents have gone down.

houses that were $300k a year ago, are now in the mid 200's.

even in west roxbury, houses are much less expensive.

i would venture to say that hyde park's rents may be a bit less, although it is up and coming.

i hear brighton/allston are outrageous as well.

i think the T is just fine.

buses run all the time as do the trains.

and, there's the commuter rail as well...very convenient.

depending on when your commute is, traveling 45 minutes will get you to suburban hospitals, which pay less.

come to think of it, weymouth, braintree would be less expensive places to live and are accessible to all major highways, as well as public transportation.

(never thought of those areas)

best of luck.

despite its expenses, i couldn't imagine living anywhere else.

leslie

I couldn't imagine living anywhere else either. Live in Hyde Park with mum, who owns the house, so I'm not sure how rent is here, but I'd venture to say that it's cheaper, as well. It is up and coming, lots of building going on, esp along Fairmount Ave & in Cleary Square.

I wouldn't reccomend new grads trying to move to, or get hired in Boston, either. As a new grad & Boston resident--the job search is tough. I don't have anything set in stone yet, but likely will soon, as I was a tech in one of the teaching hospitals (and they like to find a home within the hospital for all of us, stuff is just getting sorted out right now.) If you didn't already work at whatever hospital you are looking at, it'd probably be very difficult for you to get an interview.

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