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What would you as a student or new nurse want to tell the experienced

Posted

nurses on the units?? I was just wondering about this. I have been working with 8 ready-to-graduate nurses this past month.

I hear them discussing a lot of stuff they have covered with their teachers and mentors, and I'm just curious if you have any ideas or observations of things you'd like to update the experienced staff nurses on.

lil' girl, LPN

Specializes in LTC. Has 4 years experience.

Well maybe they should buff up on their drug dosage. Many of them don't know how to do it. Example: The other day a nurse that had graduated just the year before called our instructor because she didn't know how to figure drops per minute.

And I have noticed a lot of the nurses saying where did you learn this or that? And we are like "in class". Does the stuff really change that much from year to year?

As a student, I would remind that I am a student, remeber? you used to be one. lately i have dealt with some nurses that act like they sprung forth from their mother's womb with a nursing degree!!!!

wonderbee, BSN, RN

Specializes in critical care; community health; psych.

Without putting experienced nurses on a pedestal and dehumanizing them, I would like to remind some of them that need reminding that they are role models for those of us who are coming after. I know this may sound trite but I can't tell you how discouraging it is to have worked your butt off for at least 3 years, to have sunk your hopes and energy into a profession, to be around people for 12 solid hours who could give a rat's petut.

I don't know if this is what you are after. I would also like to tell the experienced nurses who will be precepting us wet behind the ears greenhorns that we probably didn't have a chance to practice even half the skills we learned in the skills lab and we're scared out of our epidermi to do that first (fill in the blank) so calmly walk us through it please and we will forever be in your debt.

We would also like to tell you, thank you for passing on the good stuff.

I would want them to know that although I come armed with mass amounts of information, in reality my experience is nothing when compared to what they have seen and done. I am not there to criticize them, I am there to learn from them, but in return I expect and deserve the same respect that I have for them. I would also want them to know that yes I can appear like a kid in a candy store from doing or watching any and every procedure, so if my enthusiasm bothers them they should just give me a year or so and I am sure it will wear off (or not). :chuckle

grinnurse, RN

Specializes in Med/Surge.

I think that I would want to tell them to be gentle with the new grads. and to have patience with us. They didn't start off knowing everything and neither will we. I would tell them to instruct us through the procedure, not do it for us because that is the only way that we will learn and become seasoned. I would also say to them that attitude is everything so if they have a positive attitude, so will most of us. I have been lucky in almost all of my rotations, and I think it directly related back to the attitude that I had, and didn't go in to berate them or change things, strictly to have the best experience that I could have. I would also tell them if they see something that can be improved to let me know. I also think that we, as new grads, should thank them every chance we get for sharing their knowledge and experience with us and be sincere in saying it. The new grad should in turn share any information that you see has changed and then it will be a mutual learning experience for all. I hope that we as new grads can change the saying that "Nurses eat their young" to "Nurses nurture their young".

Grinnurse

Tweety, BSN, RN

Specializes in Med-Surg, Trauma, Ortho, Neuro, Cardiac. Has 28 years experience.

Well maybe they should buff up on their drug dosage. Many of them don't know how to do it. Example: The other day a nurse that had graduated just the year before called our instructor because she didn't know how to figure drops per minute.

And I have noticed a lot of the nurses saying where did you learn this or that? And we are like "in class". Does the stuff really change that much from year to year?

Someone was actually using drops per minute??? To be honest, I couldn't do it either, I'd have to ask a student or new grad. :rotfl:

Thanks for the input. Our day shift has ADN students, and BSN students who precept and I'm going to day shift. :)

I'd wave my arms over my head and say "Hello!?!? I know you can see me over her, because I look like a giant white marshmellow!!!! Anybody?? Help!!" LOL

Many nurses at my clinical hospital ignore us, and pretend we don't exist, much less help us. I know they are busy, but it is so refreshing when you get assigned to a nurse who really wants to contribute to your education.

We want to help you. We are little sponges who soak up every last minute of this incredible experience. If you want me to do the gross stuff, I'd love to!!! Just let me be involved! Seriously, though, there are some nurses who you don't forget. You know, those nurses who explain something in easier terms and you finally just GET IT.

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