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What are the low stress nurse practitioner specialties?

Has 1 years experience. Specializes in Public Health Science.

I am applying to a nurse practitioner program and would like some advice on what specialties are like. I was a medical school student that left medical school because I realized that the demands of a doctor and quality of life was not something I wanted to pursue further so I left in my first semester of medical school. However, I love patients and I love caring for people so I would like to work as a nurse practitioner. I want to work in a manner that is humane, that will let me care for myself while caring for patients. I already have hip issues so I don't want to develop back problems on top of that. Does anyone recommend a book or any other sources that can help me learn more about what different specialties are like? If you have some wisdom from work, I would appreciate it. I am looking for a specialty that will give the opportunity to work 40 hours a week, work day shifts, where the patients will not become violent towards me or where I have to lift patients all day. I know there are stressful situations in most jobs but I am looking for a nurse practitioner specialty that will have a good work environment. Any wisdom other nurse practitioners can share would help. Thank you in advance.

Best regards,

Mindy

Undercat, BSN, MSN, CRNA

Has 41 years experience. Specializes in Retired.

There is another thread right next to this one on the exact same question. I wouldn't spend the time and money on becoming a NP if you want a low stress job. Not that they aren't out there but are very rare. Think carefully before you make the investment on a job that is not common. Most NP's work really hard exchanging one kind of stress for another.

On 8/26/2020 at 4:26 PM, Future MSN said:

I am applying to a nurse practitioner program and would like some advice on what specialties are like. I was a medical school student that left medical school because I realized that the demands of a doctor and quality of life was not something I wanted to pursue further so I left in my first semester of medical school. However, I love patients and I love caring for people so I would like to work as a nurse practitioner. I want to work in a manner that is humane, that will let me care for myself while caring for patients. I already have hip issues so I don't want to develop back problems on top of that. Does anyone recommend a book or any other sources that can help me learn more about what different specialties are like? If you have some wisdom from work, I would appreciate it. I am looking for a specialty that will give the opportunity to work 40 hours a week, work day shifts, where the patients will not become violent towards me or where I have to lift patients all day. I know there are stressful situations in most jobs but I am looking for a nurse practitioner specialty that will have a good work environment. Any wisdom other nurse practitioners can share would help. Thank you in advance.

Best regards,

Mindy

FNP at a college or FNP at a business wellness clinic.  Those would be my guesses.   Honestly, though anytime you are prescribing medications and making decisions there is going to be some stress both related to responsibility and inept administration  I don't know of many NP roles where you would be expected to lifting patient's or worried much about  getting attacked.  This is a very different role than a nursing role.  

djmatte, ADN, MSN, RN, NP

Has 7 years experience.

On 8/26/2020 at 5:26 PM, Future MSN said:

I am applying to a nurse practitioner program and would like some advice on what specialties are like. I was a medical school student that left medical school because I realized that the demands of a doctor and quality of life was not something I wanted to pursue further so I left in my first semester of medical school. However, I love patients and I love caring for people so I would like to work as a nurse practitioner. I want to work in a manner that is humane, that will let me care for myself while caring for patients. I already have hip issues so I don't want to develop back problems on top of that. Does anyone recommend a book or any other sources that can help me learn more about what different specialties are like? If you have some wisdom from work, I would appreciate it. I am looking for a specialty that will give the opportunity to work 40 hours a week, work day shifts, where the patients will not become violent towards me or where I have to lift patients all day. I know there are stressful situations in most jobs but I am looking for a nurse practitioner specialty that will have a good work environment. Any wisdom other nurse practitioners can share would help. Thank you in advance.

Best regards,

Mindy

You just named the reasons you probably shouldn’t. “Don’t want a doctors schedule” for one. That reads to me you want the autonomy and respect without the ownership. As noted there is an extensive thread on this topic still being discussed ( moderators would be wise to merge them). Imo the only “easy” FNP jobs get old and (as evidenced here) NPs often find themselves stuck and unable to branch out.  If you want easier, find a job as a Periop nurse. The pacu side is more stressful and often working afternoons, but if you get into preop, the most stress is how efficient you are at getting a patient ready for surgery.  The NP role is s quickly becoming production based. If you aren’t meeting goals or volume while still documenting well enough to protect your back side, you’ll be out looking for a new job. 

Edited by djmatte

verene, MSN

Specializes in mental health / psychiatic nursing.

I don't know if there are any "no stress" "low stress" jobs in the NP realm. I'm a PMHNP and while I love my job, it will never be with out some level of stress because that is part-and parcel for being an attending on an inpatient  unit.  I find working inpatient less stressful than outpatient, because I have coworkers and resources readily available, but it does mean I often work with some of the most vulnerable, most dangerous, and most ill  psychiatric patients in my region.   I happen to thrive on this stress most of the time, but the load can be incredibility high and I am always having to balance many different factors in providing care.

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