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What is the hardest thing about Nursing school?

Hello, for all those that have graduated nursing school, recently or long ago, what was the hardest class, course, or thing about nursing school in your opinion? And any advice on how to overcome the struggles of it?..:blushkiss

Thanks.....:nurse:

all4schwa

Specializes in Neuro ICU, Neuro/Trauma stepdown.

the hardest thing for me was the time you have to devote. i was at it morning noon and night. i don't do well with crash sessions. i can't sit still long enough or retain info that way. so i would wake up, read, do laundry, read, eat breakfast, read go to school....ect. i learned to always have my book open, that way i'm not looking for the right time to get to studying, but can take advantage of pieces of time as it presents itself.

Thanks for posting, anyone else have any thing to add?:monkeydance:

ortess1971

Specializes in OR.

The time management aspect..I worked 32 hours a week during school and sometimes it seemed like no one understood how difficult that was. The instructors would ride you harder if they found out you worked, work sometimes wondered "why are you so tired?" and family and friends were always complaining that I had no time for them anymore. Actually, there WERE people who understood...my fellow classmates and of course, my peeps here at allnurses!:mad:

Keepstanding, ASN, RN

Specializes in School Nursing.

:mad: Having to disciplinig myself to study, when my husband and kids wanted me to go have fun with them ! *sigh* !! It was all worth it though, just gotta know how to juggle :monkeydance: everything !

mom and nurse

Specializes in Acute rehab/geriatrics/cardiac rehab.

The amount of information to read and study and not having time to do "fun" things all the time.

The hardest thing for me was dealing with real patients at my first experience in the hospital. I was scared to go into the patient's room. Now, two years out of nursing school, I've handled anywhere from 6 - 10 patients at a time.

traumaRUs, MSN, APRN, CNS

Specializes in Nephrology, Cardiology, ER, ICU.

THe commonality that I hear is the protracted waiting time to get into nursing school - how to get the needed pre-reqs and in the correct order and then schedule time to go to school. Good luck.

Although I have not graduated (will graduate in December of this year) I have found the hardest thing to do was time management. Making sure to get enough study time, family time, and work time has been a constant struggle, but defiently worth it

The hardest thing for me was the lack of sleep. I'd go over to the hospital after classes ended around 6 p.m. to get my next day's patient info for my Care Plans, which we had to do the night before seeing a patient, then get home and start working on the Care Plans at 9 pm, go to bed at midnight (only if I was lucky!) and then get up at 5 to make it back to meet for pre-conference at 6:30. We had ridiculously complicated Care Plans, and I was an overachiever type who wanted 100's (or at least 95's) on them, so they took me HOURS to do!

OK, that was the whining part...so now for what might be helpful tips: take notes with you WHEREVER you go. Never go to doctor's office, anywhere at all, where you might be delayed without notes. You can always study & review in those few precious extra moments. Second tip: NEVER study last minute. It is way too much material and way too stressful. Read your notes as soon after class as you can to reinforce what you just heard. Also- consider your class time to be study time. Try to listen really hard and try to learn right on the spot; that will save you some time later. Also- I found it helpful to type summary notes on my computer before an exam. The reading and summarizing helped me to remember things. It was kind of like writing notes twice. Last tip: do help someone else study. You learn LOTS when you try to teach it to someone else. I helped tutor several students so those subjects became my 'specialty' and I knew them so much better because of it.

Best of luck!

time management

I found the hardest part was getting all the required reading in. Never procrastinate. You usually wont have the time you thought you would to do it later on. And get used to missing your favorite shows on t.v.. Pharmacology ... go over, and over and over it. Good luck.

Jules A, MSN

Specializes in Family Nurse Practitioner.

The disorganization and politics! The classes were easy, lots of work, but not hard material. It was all the extra stuff, the personalities, last minute schedule additions, staff changes etc. that I found the most difficult.

Like the others said its really important to stay on top of the studies and you will be fine.

Nursing school wasn't hard at all. It is extremly general and doesn't get deep into information. You pretty much cram through nursing school (esp. BSN programs). For example my program consisted of 1 semester of med surg that met once a week, every week we had a test based on 8 to 10 chapters. You actually begin to learn when you start to work and through self teaching by way of reading literature from not only nursing books/journals but also by reading medical, respiratory and pharmacy articles/books.

Halinja, BSN, RN

Specializes in L&D, PACU.

I agree with Jules A. The disorganization frustrates me. This is a program that has been running for years, yet it seems like the staff is often surprised/unprepared. (Show up for foley practice in the lab, and the supplies you need aren't there, nor have they been ordered...things like that)

And personalities! Yikes. Best advice, keep your head down and just get through. (a student ahead of me in the program said that, and I think it at least once a week) Don't get caught up in the politics. Just makes things harder.

It's not the material that is hard. If you study at all, you can do it.

Jules A, MSN

Specializes in Family Nurse Practitioner.

I agree with Jules A. The disorganization frustrates me. This is a program that has been running for years, yet it seems like the staff is often surprised/unprepared. (Show up for foley practice in the lab, and the supplies you need aren't there, nor have they been ordered...things like that)And personalities! Yikes. Best advice, keep your head down and just get through. (a student ahead of me in the program said that, and I think it at least once a week) Don't get caught up in the politics. Just makes things harder. It's not the material that is hard. If you study at all, you can do it.

Halinja, I'm glad I'm not the only one that felt like that! It still makes me sad because the material and new skills were so interesting and most of the other students were great but the extra, unnecessary aggravation still haunts me. It just didn't have to be that way, imho. Your advice about putting your head down and pushing forward is perfect.

Halinja, BSN, RN

Specializes in L&D, PACU.

It just didn't have to be that way, imho.

So true!!!

the hardest part for me was the mental abuse from the instructors.

most would literally browbeat you to death, making you feel 2 ft tall.

i heard they did this to teach us advocacy: that if we could defend ourselves, then we could assert ourselves to doctors, families and advocate for our pts.

i'm telling you, it was brutal.

and attending a diploma school meant i was constantly in clinicals-where most of this abuse took place.

i graduated with only a handful of students remaining.

leslie

Lara911

Specializes in School nurse, primary care.

Stress management...when you start to have patients and lot of responsability and you don't know what you do...never hesitate to ask for help, to confirm when you are unsure. Good luck!

rrivera2

Specializes in telemetry.

Learning to think in terms of "nursing themes" that we were learning in school - especially in Intro to Nursing Care - had a hard time morphing my established way of thinking to fit the correct exam answers.

Pharmacology - review, review, review, write, write, write, rewrite, rewrite, rewrite.

Getting videotaped for skills lab to show our ability - "validation". Scary in the beginning.

Skills lab using equipment/material no longer used in the "real world" - i.e. trach "ties" vs. whats in current use now in hospitals. And trach suctioning, which we learned by sterile procedure which is done in hospitals by in-line suctioning. Totally different.

Roy Fokker, BSN, RN

Specializes in ER/Trauma.

Incredible amounts of stress.

Fantastic amounts of matierial.

And the cake - tying it all together at the end.

I worked two jobs through nursing school. I think for my Junior and Senior years, I slept an average of 3-4 hours a night.

Telling you - when I gaduated school, my brain was literally feeling traumatized! :chuckle

Get used to no TV, no time for friends, no time for movies, no non-nursing related books, no vaccations (What was my reply to people asking me "What are you doing for Spring/Winter Break?" ??? SLEEP! :lol2: )

Get used to "No life..." :)

But I promise you - it's more than worth it at the end! :coollook:

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