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What is harder- nursing school or first year working?

Nurses   (16,486 Views | 80 Replies)

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ixchel specializes in critical care.

5 Articles; 4,546 Posts; 57,519 Profile Views

I found nursing school was WAY more demanding of every little bit of my time (while I had little kids and a husband to acknowledge from time to time), which was horribly stressful. The first semester really was the worst, although my second one drew some tears a couple of times (mostly because I was so exhausted).

Regarding post-graduation, I found my first year as a nurse to be the hardest thing I've ever done in my entire life. It was awful. I found writing about it to be cathartic, especially here. Here are a couple of articles I did:

https://allnurses.com/first-year-after/raw-two-months-935902.html

https://allnurses.com/first-year-after/still-raw-six-958489.html

So to answer your question, they are both extremely stressful, but they are apples and oranges, in my opinion. I don't think I'd like to go back to either one. My mantra for both then and now is, "you have to go through this to get through this." I am very happy I am a nurse now. I regret none of it, even in times when I've hated it.

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Heylove has 3 years experience as a BSN, RN, EMT-B.

203 Posts; 4,330 Profile Views

Nursing school.

I was an older student, starting nursing school when I was 37 years old. My instructors were my peers in regards to their age and dealing with similar family/homelife issues such as divorce, teenaged children, etc. and things that the majority of my classmates were not experiencing because they were in their mid-20's. My personal life was a huge struggle while I was trying to get through nursing school.

My first year of working is a piece of cake compared to my experience in nursing school. I attribute that to loving my speciality and not forcing myself to work med-surg/ICU as a new grad. THAT would have made my first year of work absolutely miserable and frankly, I wouldn't have done it.

My suggestion is to find a speciality that you enjoy. Relax through nursing school. There are always safety measures, or at least there should be, for overseeing the work done by nursing students. Good luck!

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2 Articles; 133 Posts; 4,893 Profile Views

I found nursing school was WAY more demanding of every little bit of my time (while I had little kids and a husband to acknowledge from time to time), which was horribly stressful. The first semester really was the worst, although my second one drew some tears a couple of times (mostly because I was so exhausted).

Regarding post-graduation, I found my first year as a nurse to be the hardest thing I've ever done in my entire life. It was awful. I found writing about it to be cathartic, especially here. Here are a couple of articles I did:

https://allnurses.com/first-year-after/raw-two-months-935902.html

https://allnurses.com/first-year-after/still-raw-six-958489.html

So to answer your question, they are both extremely stressful, but they are apples and oranges, in my opinion. I don't think I'd like to go back to either one. My mantra for both then and now is, "you have to go through this to get through this." I am very happy I am a nurse now. I regret none of it, even in times when I've hated it.

Thank you so much! Read both your articles and all the comments. I find it so useful in shaping my expectations to hear about other people's experiences! I really appreciate all of you taking the time to reply!!

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GermanCookie has 1 years experience and specializes in the Emergency Department.

23 Posts; 605 Profile Views

First year working. It makes you wish you were a student again.

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86 Posts; 1,277 Profile Views

I have yet to begin my LPN program. After reading posts regarding this topic (First year nursing school vs first-year nursing), I am wondering: are there jobs that are less stressful for a first year nurse? Private doctor's office, outpatient, outpatient ambulatory, etc.

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KeepinitrealCCRN has 5 years experience and specializes in SICU,CTICU.

115 Posts; 2,756 Profile Views

nursing school was awful! hands down the hardest thing i ever did in my life.

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8 Posts; 241 Profile Views

First year of nursing!!!! It's kind of like this....Remember starting nursing pre-reqs? I remember A&P being SO HARD! I was stressed out, etc. and wasn't even in the nursing program! Then I started the nursing program and I remember thinking how EASY A&P was compared to the nursing program. Nursing school is HARD, it takes a TON of time and motivation. Not to mention the countless hours of clinicals. Well then I FINALLY graduated in May 2017...Started by new job at a hospital as an RN....Wow, totally thought about how nursing school is EASY compared to being an actual NEW nurse. I have wanted to quit, I've questioned by career choice, I've basically have been thrown in an environment where you learn as you go, basically. There's a ton to learn so it's hard to teach you everything in orientation. I can say that I learn A TON of information each day I work. But the hours are long and hard. I rarely get a break, I'm usually running for 13 hours strait. It's tough. Being a new nurse is WAY harder than nursing school, in my opinion. The only perk is you get paid :) It's SLOWLY getting better but I'm not going to lie it's been a crazy eye-opener.

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SmilingBluEyes has 20 years experience.

2 Followers; 19,584 Posts; 65,660 Profile Views

Not even a close race. The first year makes nursing school look like child's play. Not trying to scare you but it's beyond difficult. Be prepared.

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51 Posts; 4,235 Profile Views

Sing it! Amen. Verdad. Yup.

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51 Posts; 4,235 Profile Views

it was a real eye-opener knowing I'm the one ultimately responsible for the patient! The bonus is that you're being paid to learn

Let's be clear - you are NOT being paid to learn. You are being paid to deliver safe, competent, skilled nursing care to vulnerable individuals who absolutely depend upon your knowledge and professional judgement to care for them across the spectrum of Maslow's hierarchy.

Nursing is not an on-the-job "trial and error" profession. We simply must get it right.

CE's are our professional duty.

Competent care and your professional judgement - that's are what you are being paid for.

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2 Articles; 133 Posts; 4,893 Profile Views

Let's be clear - you are NOT being paid to learn. You are being paid to deliver safe, competent, skilled nursing care to vulnerable individuals who absolutely depend upon your knowledge and professional judgement to care for them across the spectrum of Maslow's hierarchy.

Nursing is not an on-the-job "trial and error" profession. We simply must get it right.

CE's are our professional duty.

Competent care and your professional judgement - that's are what you are being paid for.

Don't you usually have a preceptor when you start to help teach you how things are done in that unit?

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SmilingBluEyes has 20 years experience.

2 Followers; 19,584 Posts; 65,660 Profile Views

Yes you have preceptor. But YOU are licensed and therefore, held responsible for the care you deliver according to nurse practice acts.

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