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What are my chances of being accepted?

Pre-Nursing   (888 Views | 14 Replies)
by silva_33 silva_33 (New) New Student Pre-Student

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Hi there,

I am currently a 20 year old SFSU pre-nursing student. I am thinking about applying to nursing programs in Fall 2020; whether they are universities or ADN programs doesn't really matter to me because I will go where I can get in. I don't mind going out of state either, mainly thought of Arizona maybe. I was just wondering what type of chance I would have of getting in at schools?

Grades:

Physio : just got a B- (still have to take lab)

Anat: originally got a C (retaking the class though)

Microbio: A- (lecture) A (lab)

The rest of the pre-reqs I got A's in. I am mainly worried about my sciences especially anatomy and physio. I still have yet to take my TEAS, so that is on my list of to do's before I apply.

I was thinking realistically that maybe I can get into CSU East Bay, but even now I'm not so sure anymore. I was planning on applying to City College of San Francisco, SDSU (grew up there so if you have any recommendations on where to apply there that would be great), SFSU (realistically I don't think I'll get in but I'm going to still try), and other city colleges and universities.

I got my CNA license last summer and will start working with it here soon in a few weeks. I also volunteer at UCSF hospital and have been doing that for about 2-3 years now reaching almost 200 hours.

I am just wondering what my chances are getting into a nursing program and if I'm considered a good/competitive applicant?

 

Sorry this was so long!

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Nurse SMS has 9 years experience as a MSN, RN and specializes in Critical Care; Cardiac; Professional Development.

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It depends on the school. All of them calculate things differently. Certainly your B- and your C aren't going to do you any favors. There are mixed reviews on retaking classes. 

My advice would be to get those grades up and apply all over the place. You aren't a shoo-in - more along the lines average to low average as it stands right now.

Good luck!

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davidnguyen1023 specializes in Student/Pre-Nursing.

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Hi silva_33, 

I honestly am honestly in the same situation as you, same grades (B in Anatomy, C in Physio, A+ in Micro, and A in every other class). I wish I had taken A&P at another school since my community college anatomy class made us write essays for our exams which failed many students and put others at a bad grade including me. For the TEAS, I didn't do as well on my first attempt (75.0 score) and I am retaking it this upcoming week. Many schools require a 62% passing score, but it's gotta be at least an 80 to be anywhere near competitive. 

I am also applying to CSUEB and SFSU in addition to other Universities/CCs around the bay area. Are you applying to any community college programs? I think we both have a better chance at getting into an ADN program since their requirements aren't as high; plus the people in their waitlist have good chances of getting in too.... I've read mixed reviews of retaking the sciences (A&P) to boost our grades but many program applications do deduct points for retaking them. 

I am applying for Fall 2020 admission into the programs and am pretty anxious with these applications as their due dates are coming up. To be honest, I think we both are good students as we have done well in most of our classes, but not competitive for nursing program as our grades in A&P aren't the best. If you have volunteer experience like me, or with your CNA work experience it can also help get you more points on your application. 

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On 1/3/2020 at 4:39 AM, Nurse SMS said:

It depends on the school. All of them calculate things differently. Certainly your B- and your C aren't going to do you any favors. There are mixed reviews on retaking classes. 

My advice would be to get those grades up and apply all over the place. You aren't a shoo-in - more along the lines average to low average as it stands right now.

Good luck!

Thank you for your honesty! And I will be retaking anatomy so hopefully I do better and bring my grade and chances up for programs.

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13 hours ago, davidnguyen1023 said:

Hi silva_33, 

I honestly am honestly in the same situation as you, same grades (B in Anatomy, C in Physio, A+ in Micro, and A in every other class). I wish I had taken A&P at another school since my community college anatomy class made us write essays for our exams which failed many students and put others at a bad grade including me. For the TEAS, I didn't do as well on my first attempt (75.0 score) and I am retaking it this upcoming week. Many schools require a 62% passing score, but it's gotta be at least an 80 to be anywhere near competitive. 

I am also applying to CSUEB and SFSU in addition to other Universities/CCs around the bay area. Are you applying to any community college programs? I think we both have a better chance at getting into an ADN program since their requirements aren't as high; plus the people in their waitlist have good chances of getting in too.... I've read mixed reviews of retaking the sciences (A&P) to boost our grades but many program applications do deduct points for retaking them. 

I am applying for Fall 2020 admission into the programs and am pretty anxious with these applications as their due dates are coming up. To be honest, I think we both are good students as we have done well in most of our classes, but not competitive for nursing program as our grades in A&P aren't the best. If you have volunteer experience like me, or with your CNA work experience it can also help get you more points on your application. 

I feel like in the same way we are the same person lol. But yes I will be applying to community colleges. I think after realizing how great my grades aren't I have more of a chance of getting into those programs rather than universities. I'm applying to CSUEB, Chico State, SFSU and maybe SDSU, university wise. I'm trying to keep that list short because I know applications can be pretty expensive. I plan on applying to CCSF, Skyline, Chabot College and some colleges down in San Diego.

I'm not applying until the Fall so I have some time to hopefully build up experience. What school are you attending now? And I wish you all the luck You got this!!! I would love to know the outcome in the future!

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It sounds like you have a great resume to offer the schools! 

Unfortunately, considering that program admissions are based HEAVY on the GPA points system in California, I think you will have a tough time getting admitted to a Cal State/public BSN program. They are just super competitive. 

However, I think if you re-take anatomy and get an A or B+ as well as a high TEAS, you have a great shot at gaining entry to a private BSN program or an ASN program. Additionally, I would suggest applying to schools in different states (think Nevada, Arizona, Washington, etc). 

Don't quit though, you are almost there! Good luck. 

 

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 Nursing schools evaluate their applicants differently (point/lottery/points & lottery).  In addition, you can lose points for repeat coursework.  With that said, I think you have as good of a chance as anyone else with schools utilizing a lottery system and given that you pass the TEAS. 

I think that your chances of being accepted into a school utilizing points based on your current grades & repeat might be hard.  Also, a lot will depend on how you do on the TEAS exam, so make sure to prepare for it!

I would apply to any and all schools that I think I would have a shot at getting into.  Since you’re able and willing to leave the state, maybe look at programs elsewhere that you’d have a better chance of getting into.  I know that CA has an influx of people applying to schools.

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davidnguyen1023 specializes in Student/Pre-Nursing.

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On 1/6/2020 at 8:24 AM, silva_33 said:

I feel like in the same way we are the same person lol. But yes I will be applying to community colleges. I think after realizing how great my grades aren't I have more of a chance of getting into those programs rather than universities. I'm applying to CSUEB, Chico State, SFSU and maybe SDSU, university wise. I'm trying to keep that list short because I know applications can be pretty expensive. I plan on applying to CCSF, Skyline, Chabot College and some colleges down in San Diego.

I'm not applying until the Fall so I have some time to hopefully build up experience. What school are you attending now? And I wish you all the luck You got this!!! I would love to know the outcome in the future!

@silva_33Thank you for the Kind words, I sure hope you success in the future as well! I am currently at Ohlone college, I taken most of my courses and prereqs here, despite taking Micro at Mission College. I heard Merrit college (Oakland) has a lottery system but they haven’t updated their page for new applying students yet. I’d also like an update from you on how it goes in the future. 
 

thanks,

David

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I cannot tell you what your chances to get into any nursing school  As some have eluted to, each school is a little different in how they evaluate applicants.  As someone who has recently applied to several schools and thus got into CSUEB Spring 2020 (BSN) and Johns Hopkins master's entry Fall 2020, I may have some general input.

First off, it does not matter the program--ADN, BSN, entry Masters--they're all very competitive.  If you want increase your chances, applied to schools with larger cohorts such as CSUEB and CSU Long Beach.

Yes, your physio and anatomy grades might be an issue, especially anatomy.  Retaking classes vary from program to program.  Some will ding for every retake.  Some will let you take one or two before they ding you points.  You'll need to check.  Either way, if you retake any class, make sure you significantly better; try to improve the letter grade.

As for programs, you really need to look at each program.  Sac State for example, will drop your two lowest prereqs grades; maybe the science ones too if you have more than just the minimum classes completed.  It's possible to have a 4.0 for them.  They'll look at the raw grades for tiebreakers.  BSN programs for CSU and most public schools are all about points.  Some programs give bonus points for various items such as health experience, veteran status, school attended, residence.  It varies with each program.

Community Colleges are a bit easier compared to the CSUs, but far from easy.  From the ones I looked into, it's more about meeting the requirements and luck.  Solano Community for example, if you meet the requirements and qualify, then you get put into the lottery (the luck part).  Napa Valley similar, but it's first come and qualified, first offered admission.

Out of state schools, you'll need to watch out.  Some schools will not accept any out of state applicants.  They're too impacted.  

There is a third option, which CSUEB does advise their students who may not get into their nursing program, to apply to direct entry masters or accelerated bachelors programs.  These are people who have a bachelor's in something other than nursing.  This is what I'm going to be doing.  In general, prereqs are the same in regards to classes-chemistry, anatomy, physio, microbiology.  Of course, some may want other classes too.  These programs you need to get letters of recommendation, have a resume, and complete essays.  Some may want to do an interview or have GRE scores.  These programs are very competitive to get into as well.  Some programs such as UCLA and Johns Hopkins look beyond your grades.  They do what they call a holistic evaluation.  They're looking to see if you fit within their vision; they look at the grades to see if you can handle the rigors of the program.  In general, you need to have a 3.0 cumulative GPA; Johns Hopkins required at least B- in all the prereqs.  UC Davis will reject you if your bachelor's issuing institution does not show at least 3.0 GPA on your transcript; mine did not, and they would not look at my grades from the community college before I transferred, and none after I graduated.

It may be worth noting, if you do get your bachelor's in something else, if you get into a nursing program at a CSU, even though it'll be for a BSN, you'll be considered a graduate student and pay all the fees as a graduate student.

You have a chance to get into a nursing program if you're able to maintain getting As and high Bs.  You may get waitlisted, but some schools go through the waitlist.  Some people may get into their dream school and get more free money from another school.

I graduated in the middle of my high school class.  I went to community college and had a 3.33GPA, transfer to UC San Diego, and got a 2.795GPA with a BA in economics.  I went back to school a few times and had a post-bachelors GPA of 3.79 with little health experience; about six months as an on-call CNA.  My post-bachelors work was almost all As, except for a B in physio and anatomy and a C in calculus II (calculus is three classes); and no you do not need calculus for nursing school.  I was originally doing computer science, which does require it.  I got a 87.3% on my TEAS; 99% math, 89% science.  I did well enough in all areas that no school would disqualify me for TEAS performance.

There are some nursing programs that open to anyone to enroll if you have done the prereqs.  I would be very cautious with those schools.  And you should check with any school you apply to, make sure it is accredited and you'll be to take NCLEX.  

Beyond that, you'll have to decide if the cost will be worth what the job opportunities that school can give you.

One thing about nursing, there is more than one path to get into it.  If you have more questions, I can try to answer.

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davidnguyen1023 specializes in Student/Pre-Nursing.

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20 hours ago, botmann said:

I cannot tell you what your chances to get into any nursing school  As some have eluted to, each school is a little different in how they evaluate applicants.  As someone who has recently applied to several schools and thus got into CSUEB Spring 2020 (BSN) and Johns Hopkins master's entry Fall 2020, I may have some general input.

First off, it does not matter the program--ADN, BSN, entry Masters--they're all very competitive.  If you want increase your chances, applied to schools with larger cohorts such as CSUEB and CSU Long Beach.

Yes, your physio and anatomy grades might be an issue, especially anatomy.  Retaking classes vary from program to program.  Some will ding for every retake.  Some will let you take one or two before they ding you points.  You'll need to check.  Either way, if you retake any class, make sure you significantly better; try to improve the letter grade.

As for programs, you really need to look at each program.  Sac State for example, will drop your two lowest prereqs grades; maybe the science ones too if you have more than just the minimum classes completed.  It's possible to have a 4.0 for them.  They'll look at the raw grades for tiebreakers.  BSN programs for CSU and most public schools are all about points.  Some programs give bonus points for various items such as health experience, veteran status, school attended, residence.  It varies with each program.

Community Colleges are a bit easier compared to the CSUs, but far from easy.  From the ones I looked into, it's more about meeting the requirements and luck.  Solano Community for example, if you meet the requirements and qualify, then you get put into the lottery (the luck part).  Napa Valley similar, but it's first come and qualified, first offered admission.

Out of state schools, you'll need to watch out.  Some schools will not accept any out of state applicants.  They're too impacted.  

There is a third option, which CSUEB does advise their students who may not get into their nursing program, to apply to direct entry masters or accelerated bachelors programs.  These are people who have a bachelor's in something other than nursing.  This is what I'm going to be doing.  In general, prereqs are the same in regards to classes-chemistry, anatomy, physio, microbiology.  Of course, some may want other classes too.  These programs you need to get letters of recommendation, have a resume, and complete essays.  Some may want to do an interview or have GRE scores.  These programs are very competitive to get into as well.  Some programs such as UCLA and Johns Hopkins look beyond your grades.  They do what they call a holistic evaluation.  They're looking to see if you fit within their vision; they look at the grades to see if you can handle the rigors of the program.  In general, you need to have a 3.0 cumulative GPA; Johns Hopkins required at least B- in all the prereqs.  UC Davis will reject you if your bachelor's issuing institution does not show at least 3.0 GPA on your transcript; mine did not, and they would not look at my grades from the community college before I transferred, and none after I graduated.

It may be worth noting, if you do get your bachelor's in something else, if you get into a nursing program at a CSU, even though it'll be for a BSN, you'll be considered a graduate student and pay all the fees as a graduate student.

You have a chance to get into a nursing program if you're able to maintain getting As and high Bs.  You may get waitlisted, but some schools go through the waitlist.  Some people may get into their dream school and get more free money from another school.

I graduated in the middle of my high school class.  I went to community college and had a 3.33GPA, transfer to UC San Diego, and got a 2.795GPA with a BA in economics.  I went back to school a few times and had a post-bachelors GPA of 3.79 with little health experience; about six months as an on-call CNA.  My post-bachelors work was almost all As, except for a B in physio and anatomy and a C in calculus II (calculus is three classes); and no you do not need calculus for nursing school.  I was originally doing computer science, which does require it.  I got a 87.3% on my TEAS; 99% math, 89% science.  I did well enough in all areas that no school would disqualify me for TEAS performance.

There are some nursing programs that open to anyone to enroll if you have done the prereqs.  I would be very cautious with those schools.  And you should check with any school you apply to, make sure it is accredited and you'll be to take NCLEX.  

Beyond that, you'll have to decide if the cost will be worth what the job opportunities that school can give you.

One thing about nursing, there is more than one path to get into it.  If you have more questions, I can try to answer.

Hi @botmann I’d like to say thank you for telling all this information. I am only following Silva’s thread but his position very much is similar to mines. I have a 3.8 Cumulative GPA and my grades in sciences: (Anatomy:B, Phsyio:C, Microbio: A). And I taken the TEAs 6 twice: 74 first time and 78.7 second time. I am applying to 4 CSUs around the Bay Area and mostly all the CC ADN programs too. Working on the applications and seeing how low my points total up (about 60-70 out a 100) just turns me off. I am also applying for Merrit College’s Lottery system program as well. I was thinking if I don’t get in I’ll transfer to SJSU and do a bachelors in a different major. And then later apply to Entry Level MSN programs as my Plan B.  Do you think the grade requirements for these MSN programs are as strict as an Entry BSN/ADN? I know it is competitive either way. My alternate major for now is Public Health and was also wondering if that is good prior to an Entry MSN program?

thank you,

David 

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3 hours ago, davidnguyen1023 said:

...  Do you think the grade requirements for these MSN programs are as strict as an Entry BSN/ADN? ...

I cannot say what major "looks" better to admissions personnel for direct entry MSN programs.  Obviously some majors may be more helpful in preparing for the rigors.  Personally, I say major in something you find interesting and can use to find work.  My bachelors is in economics. which I earned many years ago.

As for grades and the requirements, it really depends on the programs.  In general, a lot of nursing programs want a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or higher.  Some programs want higher, some will take lower.  You have to check with the programs and you may want to ask.  For example, UC Davis is very strick if your bachelor issuing school's transcript does not show 3.0.  They will not look at any grades from school before that school or anything after obtaining the bachelor's.  In my case, mine did not and I wrote and asked specifically about people who transferred and was advised I would not be considered.  On the other hand, UCLA and Johns Hopkins both said they want a 3.0 GPA, but will consider those who are below.  I wrote UCLA about the GPA and was told they do a more holistic approach, but I would need to show I was a significantly better student now than back then and would need really good essays and letters of recommendation.  They also said given my past, I would need at least Bs in all my classes in my post-bachelorette work; although it the website said you need C or better in your science courses.  Johns Hopkins, they do the holistic approach too and want 3.0.  They do say and are strict about wanting B- in all science courses.  I saw some programs want GRE scores; UCLA and Johns Hopkins did not require them.  I saw one program in Riverside California wanted TEAS scores (which they would only accept scores no older than a year).

I would not say the programs are really strick towards their requirement per se.  They have to use these things as a way to narrow down the candidate pool so they do not have to read all four hundred plus application essays.  Very similar to people applying to four-year universities for bachelors. In regards to the TEAS, there is some evidence that score is an indicator of how well students can handle rigors of the program; this is material you're supposed to have a good knowledge base on.

In your situation, I would look at what programs are requiring, ask them any questions or concerns you have, and try your best.  If you want to be a nurse, any of these programs will get you there.  Realize you may not get in on the first try.  You may need a bridge program to get your BSN or MSN.  I've heard the bridge programs are not as competitive.  CSUEB said during the information session I went to that pretty much everyone who applies the ADN-BSN bridge program that qualifies gets a spot because it's usually not impacted; if it is, it's a lottery.  Lastly, being on the waitlist is not a bad thing.  Sometimes the schools will actually end up going through the waitlist.

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The only people who can give you honest input are the schools.  A 4.0 GPA is meaningless if the application has an essay and you made it clear that you have no common sense.  A good GPA doesn't guarantee you'll be accepted to any nursing program, and a low GPA doesn't mean that you're going to have any school deny you when you apply for their program.  If you need a 3.9 to get accepted, the school isn't going to make the minimum 3.0.  Do you honestly think they like going through thousands of applications turning them all down because of GPA, when they can just raise the requirement and instead of having 3,000 applicants for 50 spots, cut it down to only 200 applicants?

They look at way more than your GPA, even California.  But no matter what state you're in or how perfect your GPA is, don't limit yourself to one option.  Apply to multiple schools.  If there's an essay part of the application, take your time and get input from someone you can trust to be honest.  If you're taking prereqs, knock out as many general education classes as you can.  Any entrance exams, make sure you're competent at math and your sciences and have breakfast before you go and sit down and really take the time to do great.

SOOOO many people get so hung up on their GPA that they forget to focus on all the other things that are going to decide if they get into nursing school.  Most schools would rather take a student with a 3.5 who researched and planned ahead over someone with a 4.0 who they had to tell to take a class over the summer.  And the student who met with the nursing program's administrators and went over how to increase their chances and followed through with the input, but only get exactly the 3.0 that their school requires probably has an advantage over both of them.  GPA is only one thing on a checklist of requirements.  If you got a C in anatomy but score high on your TEAS and all your general education requirements are done, you can very possibly have a huge advantage over everyone who got an A on every prereq but still have to take general education courses while they're in the nursing program.  Apply to multiple schools and just see what happens.  If you make all the minimum requirements, your chances of getting accepted are equal to everyone else's.  Schools don't only look at GPA.  They wouldn't list their minimum as 3.0 if they're not going to accept anyone with less than a 3.9, that's just stupid and giving themselves a ton of extra work every year just to shatter people's dreams.  If you're not a straight A student, find other ways to stand out.

Edited by tonyl1234

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