Jump to content

on What area do the new nurses are poor????? share your insights.

Students   (1,359 Views 11 Comments)
by applemae applemae (New Member) New Member

734 Profile Views; 10 Posts

with the boost of nursing career all over the world, and due to demands of nurses, lots are already taking up the course.... thus, the nursing population all over the world particularly in asian countries are in at its peak!

on the other hand as the nursing schools accepts and accepts students, as the students population grew in number, the quqlity of education and trainings offered are obviously been degrading... which results to unskilled and unqualified nurses.!

please share your insights...thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

437 Posts; 3,874 Profile Views

Huh?

Nursing Schools around here just don't accept anyone. They only accept the "best of the best" and I think it's that way across most of the US. IMO, nursing school is NOT easy and if you can survive it then you are more than qualified to practice as a nurse!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

MikeyJ is a RN and specializes in Peds, PICU, Home health, Dialysis.

1,124 Posts; 9,285 Profile Views

I am kind of confused by your question.. but I agree with the other poster that nursing schools do their best to keep unsafe students from graduating to become nurses. Of course there are probably better measures some schools could take to improve their nursing graduates, but schools are pushed to graduate nurses as quickly as possible to help fill the nursing shortage. Thus, I think nursing schools main objective is to give students information that will help them practice SAFELY and give them a broad introduction into the field of nursing. They understand that most of the training will happen on the job as a new grad.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

3 Articles; 10,428 Posts; 89,150 Profile Views

I think the OP is speaking of her/his experience with Phillipines nursing schools. Perhaps there, they ARE "accepting anyone" and thus leads to the problem of large numbers of people finishing schools so they can get a job in the US....but are unable to pass NCLEX. My understanding is that the quality of Phillipine nursing schools is considerably below ours, and unfortunately that means that the quality of the graduating students matches it. They still have to pass OUR exam in order to practice here, so at least we have a means to keep out those who would bring down the quality, weed out most of those who should not be practicing nurses. Of course, there's no clinical component, so who knows what the level of quality is currently in that department. There are obviously some excellent nurses educated in that environment, but we're talking generalities. And those who DO pass the NCLEX are just as "qualified" to practice here as anyone else who passes the same exam.

As for US schools, it is usually so difficult to find a placement (speaking most specifically of RN programs) that schools can afford to do just the opposite of what the OP fears: schools frequently are able to choose the best students, and the students they expect to graduate and pass the NCLEX. They base these choices on prior GPAs, multiple entrance exams, as well as exams during programs that are designed to eliminate those most likely to fail.

I think the quality of nurses in the US, when trained in this manner, has only improved.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

MikeyJ is a RN and specializes in Peds, PICU, Home health, Dialysis.

1,124 Posts; 9,285 Profile Views

Oh, I totally misunderstood the OP's question/concern. :)

On that note, our area of the country has a large number of phillipino nurses and they seem to do just as well as the U.S. taught nurses. However, I have a phillipino nurse in my pharmacology class (she isn't enrolled in nursing school but rather just pharmacology). When we all introduced ourselves, she mentioned she is mandated to take it by the state because she failed the NCLEX 3 times in a row. She seems like a very very intelligent lady but the language is obviously a barrier and I think it really hinders her when she takes an NCLEX style question. I was talking to her after our first exam and she only scored a 50%. Luckily our professor is a native phillipino and seems to have taken her under her wing to try and meet with her and try and get her to understand these types of questions.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tweety is a BSN, RN and specializes in Med-Surg, Trauma, Ortho, Neuro, Cardiac.

2 Followers; 28,919 Posts; 47,627 Profile Views

I'm concerned with the Phillipine nurse factory pumping out nurses and the rise of so many schools there that may not be legit. I think America should only accept graduates from NLN approved schools.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

8,409 Posts; 26,190 Profile Views

Huh?

Nursing Schools around here just don't accept anyone. They only accept the "best of the best" and I think it's that way across most of the US. IMO, nursing school is NOT easy and if you can survive it then you are more than qualified to practice as a nurse!

Amen!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

3 Articles; 10,428 Posts; 89,150 Profile Views

I'm concerned with the Phillipine nurse factory pumping out nurses and the rise of so many schools there that may not be legit. I think America should only accept graduates from NLN approved schools.

Yep, I'm with you there. We have to remember that the ability to pass the NCLEX is only an indicator of the minimum level of understanding of scope of practice and responsibilities. It is not an indicator that anyone is about to be a great nurse, just one who has passed the minimum standard.

Now, after my nursing school experience and reading about countless others' here on allnurses.com, I feel that by the time someone gets to TAKE that exam, they're in pretty darned good shape to start out in the nursing world. However, my confidence in that system is blown when I hear of the quality of nursing education elsewhere in the world, and specifically the Phillipines.

Someone commented on a foreign graduate having failed the NCLEX 3 times, seemingly in large part due to language barriers. Well, of course I can understand that English is a second language for her, and I have considerable respect for those who manage to master it, but I don't have tremendous sympathy for those who cannot pass the NCLEX because of language issues. After all, these nurses do expect to work in US hospitals, where there is not only fast-spoken English, but slang and plenty of medical terms thrown in the jumble. They have to be able to understand English implicitly, not casually, as the opportunity for error is huge.

Where language is a concern, frankly, I have to feel for the patient here, bigtime. I recently got a patient reassigned to me after the nurse who WAS assigned to him got tossed out of the room. Seems she couldn't make herself understood to him, she also didn't understand what he was trying to tell her, and he was afraid she was likely to injure him. I gather she's a recent transplant, through an agency, and honestly after talking with her I have no idea what the heck she was saying, either...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

MikeyJ is a RN and specializes in Peds, PICU, Home health, Dialysis.

1,124 Posts; 9,285 Profile Views

I'm concerned with the Phillipine nurse factory pumping out nurses and the rise of so many schools there that may not be legit. I think America should only accept graduates from NLN approved schools.

That is a little ethnocentric to say that.

It goes a tad bit too far to say that you must graduate form an NLN approved school to practice as a nurse. That would hinder most immigrants in our country with previous nursing education to practice in the U.S. If a nurse from another country is able to pass the NCLEX, then that obviously says something about their nursing education. Just because there is a language barrier does not mean they can't safely practice as a nurse.

Have you ever looked at the curriculum of nursing programs in other countries (more specifically, that of the Phillipines)? Their nursing schools can be just as rigorous, and in some cases more rigorous, then ours. Our school actually has a program where you can actually do some of your nursing coursework in the Phillipines (sort of like an abroad program). Furthermore, I think international nurses bring new ideas and experiences that U.S. nurses do not have.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

3 Articles; 10,428 Posts; 89,150 Profile Views

Just because there is a language barrier does not mean they can't safely practice as a nurse.

I couldn't disagree more with you here.

A nurse in a US hospital has to be able to speak English fluently, period. He or she MUST be able to both be understood and understand. How do you suppose it is safe practice if a nurse who struggles with English must administer an unfamiliar drug (or one with a name that sounds very much like another one, very common)...and can't decipher the drug book? Or can't figure out from the chart if this is a correct order? Or can't take a telephone order correctly because she doesn't understand the person on the other end (or they can't understand her)? How is it possible for a nurse to safely practice if she can't communicate in clear English with an English-speaking patient? Or with the stack of professional staff and ancillary staff who must be able to communicate effectively with her for the safety of the patient? No, if there is a language barrier it absolutely means they can't safely practice as a nurse in the US.

Have you ever looked at the curriculum of nursing programs in other countries (more specifically, that of the Phillipines)? Their nursing schools can be just as rigorous, and in some cases more rigorous, then ours. Our school actually has a program where you can actually do some of your nursing coursework in the Phillipines (sort of like an abroad program).

I would strongly suggest you look into this further. If you do, you will likely find that this "rigorous coursework" leaves approximately half of their graduating students unable to pass our minimum standard exam. It is well recognized that their standards for curriculum ( overall, not picking out this one or that) are NOT keeping current with what's considered acceptable over here. Their focus is getting $$ for every student that runs in the door, not about preparing them to actually be successful US-employed nurses, and that is what Tweety's comment was about.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

meant4me2 specializes in LTC, Medical Day Care.

60 Posts; 2,236 Profile Views

We had a woman seeking employment at our center telling me she was "a nurse" she was from the Phillipines and was unable to give me answers on very minimal questions I had asked. This led me to believe she was not a nurse, and my instincts proved correct because i did give her an application and when she completed it there was no sign of her original declaration.

Also, anyone wielding a "copied" license should be asked for further documentation. There has also been reports of originals being tampered with/altered. Very scary.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
×