Weapons on Site

Specialties Psychiatric

Published

  • Specializes in Cath Lab, OR, CPHN/SN, ER.

Does your facility allow officers (city cops, sherrif) to carry their weapons at the facility?

I live in NC, where nearby at a state-run mental facility, while a patient was being admitted, he managed to get away from the officer, wrestle the officer for the gun, and shot an employee before killing himself. It's unclear on the news what the status of the employee is. I'm curious how this is going to change policy around here. -andrea

TitaniaSidhe

190 Posts

I work in the VA system, our officers carry guns but must remove the clip(bullets) before entering the buildings & dealing with patients.

Nurse Ratched, RN

2,149 Posts

Specializes in Geriatrics/Oncology/Psych/College Health.

We have a locked box outside of our unit and no one is permitted to carry weapons inside.

I really can't imagine doing it any other way because of the potential for just the kind of circumstances you described. I'm so sorry to hear about it.

Whispera, MSN, RN

3,458 Posts

Specializes in psych, addictions, hospice, education.

Where I've worked, officers who bring patients to the units lock their weapons in a lock box in the emergency department before coming into the units. However, if we call them for help in an intense situation, they bring their weapons and use them if needed (although that hasn't happened since I've been here--the using).

Aneroo, LPN

1 Article; 1,518 Posts

Specializes in Cath Lab, OR, CPHN/SN, ER.

Thank you. I forgot that a psych unit at our hospital has a lock box, but officer's carry their weapons in the ED. Kinda concerns me. -A

Editorial Team / Admin

sirI, MSN, APRN, NP

18 Articles; 34,693 Posts

Specializes in Education, FP, LNC, Forensics, ED, OB.

Yes, our police officers carry loaded weapons in the facility. We have a large number of prisoners from 4 maximum security facilities that frequent our institution. Also, we have the highest murder rate per captia for the U.S. and largest meth use per capita.

The use of the guns has averted a potential serious situation numerous times, but, never had a problem with a gun and hope it never happens. I know it is a possibility, however.

Siri

Whispera, MSN, RN

3,458 Posts

Specializes in psych, addictions, hospice, education.

I'm talking about a psych hospital when I say the officers lock their guns in a lock box. In the general hospital I used to work in, no one locked their weapons anywhere. Security carried guns too.

CharlieRN

374 Posts

I'm in favor of armed nurses in the ED. (A nice little pearl handled, stainless steel .38, in a white leather holster, to match the uniform. It would have made me feel safer.) ;)

I once tried to have officers leave their guns outside my psych unit. They said no. That ended the discussion. Having a gun tends to do that.

SWFlorida

75 Posts

Tasers are good. Leaves those who are out of control incapacitated for a short term without any long term side effects.

Most hospitals do have policies regarding loaded guns in ther facility. If this policy is ignored, or the facility isn't diligent about following the policy they are liable for any damages that may occour to staff, visitors or pts.

Specializes in Psych.
Tasers are good. Leaves those who are out of control incapacitated for a short term without any long term side effects.

Most hospitals do have policies regarding loaded guns in ther facility. If this policy is ignored, or the facility isn't diligent about following the policy they are liable for any damages that may occour to staff, visitors or pts.

We USED to have a policy against p.o.'s having guns inside the hospital (especially psych). That policy is no more and it is scary...Often wish we had metal detectors at our doors. Ah well, wishful thinking, I wonder how much a metal detector costs these days. Wish I held a patent for a good one.:roll

Thunderwolf, MSN, RN

6 Articles; 6,621 Posts

Specializes in Med-Surg, Geriatric, Behavioral Health.
We have a locked box outside of our unit and no one is permitted to carry weapons inside.

I really can't imagine doing it any other way because of the potential for just the kind of circumstances you described. I'm so sorry to hear about it.

I echo this.

CharlieRN

374 Posts

I think that the decision to not bring a weapon into any facility rests with the police officer involved. He/she is the person responsible. Most likely the policy of the police department, not that of the facility, is the determining factor. Ingeneral terms it would be irresponsible for a police officer to disarm before entering a potentially dangerous situation.

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