Warning Signs Associated With Degree Mills and Scam Schools

Updated | Published
by TheCommuter TheCommuter, BSN, RN

Specializes in Case mgmt., rehab, (CRRN), LTC & psych. Has 16 years experience.

The number of diploma mills in the US is on the rise as prospective students seek to take action against their perceived economic insecurity. In fact, a scam school operated a fake nursing program for five years, separating pupils from their tuition dollars. In too many cases, the education received from these schools does not lead to increased earning potential for graduates. More commonly, graduates find themselves in intractable debt. This piece lists the red flags commonly associated with diploma mills and scam schools.

You are reading page 3 of Warning Signs Associated With Degree Mills and Scam Schools. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

Izaguirre

Izaguirre

1 Post

University of Mount Olive is NOW CCNE accredited. It was a new program and it takes about 2.5 years to become accredited. They are also recognized by the NCBON.

WookieeRN, BSN, MSN, RN

Specializes in PACU. Has 5 years experience. 1,050 Posts

Izaguirre said:
University of Mount Olive is NOW CCNE accredited. It was a new program and it takes about 2.5 years to become accredited. They are also recognized by the NCBON.

Oh, that's good to hear!

Hello BSWtoRN...

Let me correct your post from May 10th titled "University of Mount Olive RN-BSN: Scam Alert/Degree Mill??"

If you understood anything about developing a new degree program, curriculum design and development, and the process of receiving accreditation from the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE), then you would know that it takes two semesters of program assessment data to write the Self-Study document that supports your request for accreditation through documented evidence of meeting your program outcomes. In addition, with the influx of educational needs from the nursing industry - demanding BSNs at the bedside - and the massive influx of new programs, the CCNE on-site evaluation calendar is filled up a year in advance, so it takes a year to get a date for evaluation.

UMO is a regional accredited institution with SACSCOC, and all of it's degrees are stringently meeting the demands of SACSCOC. UMO is not a "degree mill" and I find your title frankly offensive, especially since you evidently did not do your homework before making such an outlandish written statement on the Internet.

In addition, the UMO RN to BSN proudly started their inaugural cohort in January 2012 with 20 students and now (to date) have over 120 students with 61 graduates, so why don't you ask one of them if earning their BSN with UMO was worth it versus making unfounded accusations about the quality of UMOs RN to BSNs curriculum. The attrition rate at UMO in the RN to BSN is less than 2 percent, so they must be doing something right because they matriculate and graduate just about every student that enters the program.

CCNE did interview 15 of the UMO RN to BSN students during their on-site visit in January 2014, and they even quoted some of the students in their on-site evaluation report, which is made public in their online Nursing Student Center. And, before CCNE left they told UMOs RN to BSN administrators that they met all four standards of accreditation, but until the official letter comes from CCNE, which does not happen until the CCNE Board meets (only twice a year), it took an additional 11 months to receive the official CCNE accreditation letter after their October 2014 meeting convened.

The RN to BSN at UMO has received CCNE accreditation, in the appropriate time frame for any new program. In addition, the UMO RN to BSN program has a very liberal transfer policy taking up to 93 sh of other college and university coursework to cover the general education requirements, leaving the student to only have to take the 33 sh core nursing major to earn their 126 sh BSN degree. UMO also makes an experienced RNs professional experience turn into elective hour credits by using Experiential Learning Credits (ELCs), which are cheaper than a standard course, and saves an experienced nurse time and money! In addition, the UMO RN to BSN degree program is year round, and only takes 4 semesters to complete, which gets the BSN in the hands of the students faster - especially if they bring the general education courses to the table (which is also a cheaper option if they take them at the community college or CLEP/DSST them).

Bottom line...UMO is founded on the Church, and supports the community in every way it can, and when the call for higher educated bedside nurses became a national mandate...they answered. Yes, the tuition is higher than the state system, but UMO treats you like a person and not a number. The RN to BSN faculty know you, and treat you like a colleague and not just a student. And, UMO gladly accepts 93 sh of transfer credit allowing the RN the fastest track to earning their BSN and minimizing the costs while doing so. The RN to BSN faculty are respectful and respectable of every student!

Comments such as yours are offensive and completely unfounded. Do your homework or actually call and ask someone at UMO admissions, or directly in the Nursing Department, before you make a fool out of yourself publicly on the internet.

OH, and one more thing...

The Watts School of Nursing gives you a diploma in nursing and the University of Mount Olive gives you an associate degree in health sciences, not a degree in nursing. The nursing department at UMO has nothing do to with the associate degree in health sciences. It is run through the department of recreation and leisure studies at UMO, so if you have any questions about that degree, you'll need to contact them.

I would suggest you find out what the employers in your area will hire you with - associate degree versus bachelor's degree versus diploma. Most large employers that are Magnet, or are going Magnet, will not hire a new grad diploma nurse, and when they hire associate degree nurses they do so with an educational contract to earn their BSN in a certain period of time or lose their job. The associate degree in health sciences is absolutely useless in the nursing world, so earning that is your decision, but it will not help you get a nursing job.

elkpark

14,633 Posts

RN to BSN at UMO said:
Hello BSWtoRN...

Let me correct your post from May 10th titled "University of Mount Olive RN-BSN: Scam Alert/Degree Mill??"

If you understood anything about developing a new degree program, curriculum design and development, and the process of receiving accreditation from the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE), then you would know that it takes two semesters of program assessment data to write the Self-Study document that supports your request for accreditation through documented evidence of meeting your program outcomes. In addition, with the influx of educational needs from the nursing industry - demanding BSNs at the bedside - and the massive influx of new programs, the CCNE on-site evaluation calendar is filled up a year in advance, so it takes a year to get a date for evaluation.

UMO is a regional accredited institution with SACSCOC, and all of it's degrees are stringently meeting the demands of SACSCOC. UMO is not a "degree mill" and I find your title frankly offensive, especially since you evidently did not do your homework before making such an outlandish written statement on the Internet.

In addition, the UMO RN to BSN proudly started their inaugural cohort in January 2012 with 20 students and now (to date) have over 120 students with 61 graduates, so why don't you ask one of them if earning their BSN with UMO was worth it versus making unfounded accusations about the quality of UMOs RN to BSNs curriculum. The attrition rate at UMO in the RN to BSN is less than 2 percent, so they must be doing something right because they matriculate and graduate just about every student that enters the program.

CCNE did interview 15 of the UMO RN to BSN students during their on-site visit in January 2014, and they even quoted some of the students in their on-site evaluation report, which is made public in their online Nursing Student Center. And, before CCNE left they told UMOs RN to BSN administrators that they met all four standards of accreditation, but until the official letter comes from CCNE, which does not happen until the CCNE Board meets (only twice a year), it took an additional 11 months to receive the official CCNE accreditation letter after their October 2014 meeting convened.

The RN to BSN at UMO has received CCNE accreditation, in the appropriate time frame for any new program. In addition, the UMO RN to BSN program has a very liberal transfer policy taking up to 93 sh of other college and university coursework to cover the general education requirements, leaving the student to only have to take the 33 sh core nursing major to earn their 126 sh BSN degree. UMO also makes an experienced RNs professional experience turn into elective hour credits by using Experiential Learning Credits (ELCs), which are cheaper than a standard course, and saves an experienced nurse time and money! In addition, the UMO RN to BSN degree program is year round, and only takes 4 semesters to complete, which gets the BSN in the hands of the students faster - especially if they bring the general education courses to the table (which is also a cheaper option if they take them at the community college or CLEP/DSST them).

Bottom line...UMO is founded on the Church, and supports the community in every way it can, and when the call for higher educated bedside nurses became a national mandate...they answered. Yes, the tuition is higher than the state system, but UMO treats you like a person and not a number. The RN to BSN faculty know you, and treat you like a colleague and not just a student. And, UMO gladly accepts 93 sh of transfer credit allowing the RN the fastest track to earning their BSN and minimizing the costs while doing so. The RN to BSN faculty are respectful and respectable of every student!

Comments such as yours are offensive and completely unfounded. Do your homework or actually call and ask someone at UMO admissions, or directly in the Nursing Department, before you make a fool out of yourself publicly on the internet.

WOW!. Do you actually work for UMO, or are you just a student there? Usually, when people from schools (official representatives, that is) post here to correct misinformation about their school, they make an effort to sound friendly and welcoming (not angry, defensive, and condescending). The faculty at the school may be "respectful and respectable (??) of every student," but your post is not v. respectful toward potential students (which seems rather shortsighted to me). I think you can be confident that you won't have worry about being troubled any further by the OP -- and you have probably turned off a lot of other people here who might be looking for an RN to BSN program in NC (I know that I would be crossing UMO off my list about now, if I were in the market for a program).

I'm actually a very proud alumni from the RN to BSN program at UMO, who took part in the entire CCNE accreditation process. The faculty there kept all of the students updated, and included us all in the process as a learning experience as future nurse educators. Part of what they taught us was to base all our communication and practice on evidence, and not to make unfounded statements - especially in such a public forum, in print. UMO's RN to BSN degree program is developing strong nursing leaders and educators, and I'll be proud to attend their future MSN program too.

elkpark

14,633 Posts

RN to BSN at UMO said:
I'm actually a very proud alumni from the RN to BSN program at UMO, who took part in the entire CCNE accreditation process. The faculty there kept all of the students updated, and included us all in the process as a learning experience as future nurse educators. Part of what they taught us was to base all our communication and practice on evidence, and not to make unfounded statements - especially in such a public forum, in print. UMO's RN to BSN degree program is developing strong nursing leaders and educators, and I'll be proud to attend their future MSN program too.

If you're so proud of the school, you might want to try harder to avoid creating such a negative impression of the school in public online forums. I doubt the school appreciates it.

mmc51264, ADN, BSN, MSN, RN

Specializes in orthopedic; Informatics, diabetes. Has 10 years experience. 3,131 Posts

Watts is also associated with Duke. Duke hires Watts students and they are given the opportunity to get their RN-BSN at UMO. I work with many Watts who are going the UMO route. Duke reimburses some. I came into Duke with an ADN and chose to go UNCW b/c it was cheaper. ECU had crappy curriculum and ridiculous "clinical" requirements for the online program. There is nothing wrong with UMO. They were one of the first to help working nurses with an opportunity to get their BSN while working. Over 6 years ago, my CNA instructor went there to get his BSN.

WantMyBSN2015

WantMyBSN2015

4 Posts

The University of Mount Olive RN to BSN is fully accredited by CCNE, and the University of Mount Olive as an institution is fully accredited by SACS. It is awful that this person is calling it a "Scam Alert/Degree Mill" on the Internet without doing any homework and asking someone at the University. I know that when I spoke to Dr. Kieffer, she was wonderful and answered all my questions, and we discussed the recent accreditation. She sent me a link to CCNE and that you can clearly see UMO on the list...all the dates and information, etc. Shame on someone publicly calling the University and the RN to BSN a degree mill and a scam.

WantMyBSN2015

WantMyBSN2015

4 Posts

Duke is not hiring the diplomas very much anymore. They are Magnet now. I called the Nurse Recruiter and asked. I would stay far away from a diploma program, if I were you. They are not being hired anymore. Get your BSN or get your ASN and then go straight to a BSN right away. None of the Magnet facilities are hiring a diploma grad, they all want BSNs!

mmc51264, ADN, BSN, MSN, RN

Specializes in orthopedic; Informatics, diabetes. Has 10 years experience. 3,131 Posts

Duke will hire a Watts student. I discussed that with my NMO, I have my ADN and will be finished in 3 weeks w/BSN. I just brought that up b/c I had to do an interview with admin and I asked about it. Many, if not all, Watts do their clinical at Duke, too. Obviuosl not the most desirable, but they do. They have hired lots of ADN nurses after Magnet and they are helping them achieve their BSN. My NMloves the ADNs. Magnet is a lot more than just BSN. As long as we're at 80% BSN (or higher) it's ok.

mailchimp

mailchimp

33 Posts

First of all, the OP was asking a question. There were no claims made...it was posed as a question. If Watts can't handle someone asking a question, I think there are bigger problems at hand here. Personally, the place seems ridiculous to me. Forcing you to have 18 hrs at UMO regardless of if you need credits...it does seem scammy to me. Why make a student spend money they don't need to be spending and waste time they don't need to be wasting?