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Vasovagal syncope as sole reason for nursing school dismissal

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by Mom.6 Mom.6 (New) New

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My daughter was diagnosed Thursday with vasovagal syncope.  The attending physician wrote a doctor's note stating that she is cleared to work clinicals with no restrictions.  The school she is attending contacted her that same day.  They will be having a meeting with her on Monday to determine if they will let her continue in the program due solely to the vasovagal syncope diagnosis.  She has this semester and one more and she will graduate with her BSN.  Daughter says her triggers are dehydration and boredom.  What can be done to keep the school from dismissing her from the program?

londonflo

Specializes in oncology. Has 44 years experience.

Did she faint? Was it in the OR, standing a long time?

Last week she fainted while the clinical group was looking at an empty delivery room.  She loves blood and guts.  It's the mundane things that are a problem.  She has worked as a CNA at a nursing home with no episodes.  She also says that she has only fainted in the first few hours of clinicals; never had an issue later in the day.

londonflo

Specializes in oncology. Has 44 years experience.

Did the school require her to get a Doctor's note? I have had students faint. It was a usual thing but in 40 years I have had a couple. I did send one to the ER because she hit her head. Did she eat that morning? The fainting would happen when students did not eat and then stood for a long time. She needs to make sure she doesn't lock her knees and to change positions every once in a while. 

1 hour ago, Mom.6 said:

  Daughter says her triggers are dehydration and boredom. 

I would have her revise her 'triggers' to eliminate 'boredom' when describing the fainting to faculty. 

1 hour ago, londonflo said:

[...]

I would have her revise her 'triggers' to eliminate 'boredom' when describing the fainting to faculty. 

Agreed.  She might consider leaving these out of the discussion as well:

2 hours ago, Mom.6 said:

... She loves blood and guts.  It's the mundane things that are a problem. ...

 

Thanks for the advise!

They did require a doctor's note and he said she could participate in clinicals with NO restrictions.

amoLucia

Specializes in retired LTC.

On ‎10‎/‎1‎/‎2021 at 5:15 PM, Mom.6 said:

...   It's the mundane things that are a problem.  She has worked as a CNA at a nursing home with no episodes.  She also says that she has only fainted in the first few hours of clinicals; never had an issue later in the day.

my bolding

I'm reading this as if there have been other multiple times during clinicals??? How does dtr define MUNDANE?

What could be so mundane as her helping someone ambulate and DOWN goes dtr, poss taking a pt with her!?!? Or carrying an infant and the room starts spinning?!?!

I do see the school's concern re her safety and that of her pts. And it is REAL.

And this is just a personal ... I would have preferred to speak with dtr, not a spokesperson. She will need to speak her issue with TPTB and this would have be an opp'ty for her to practice, esp for those other situations that will most surely come up as she progresses in her career.

Just personal as I say, but here on AN we get spokespersons AND phoney imposters. We never know.

In 6 semesters she has had 4 episodes.  None of them directly involved a patient.  From my readings, syncope happens when standing for long periods of time.  Movement will prevent syncope.  This has only happened while she is at school.  At her job, working with patients, she has never had an episode.  

Definition of mundane, standing around doing nothing.  Working with a patient is not mundane. 

londonflo

Specializes in oncology. Has 44 years experience.

Quote

In 6 semesters she has had 4 episodes. 

On 10/2/2021 at 10:47 PM, Mom.6 said:

In 6 semesters she has had 4 episodes. 

I thought this was a one off. 4 episodes are a pattern that should concern someone who is going to be responsible for the ambulatory needs of the elderly, the new post-op patient, the new post-op patient, the new mother and her baby. It is not all about "completing nursing school". As nurses we do a lot of mundane and boring activities. 

BTW nurses do spend time assisting Physicians with procedures at the bedside while standing for long periods. While her career plans may not involve this type of position, she may want to consider it. 

After 4 times, I can now understand the faculty's concern.  

londonflo

Specializes in oncology. Has 44 years experience.

On 10/2/2021 at 10:55 PM, Mom.6 said:

Definition of mundane, standing around doing nothing. 

She hasn't yet been in a registered nurse position..Do you think she can be employed with an all active, all-nursing job as a fledgling nurse, or even an experienced nurse. 

Personally I have to ask, why isn't she here to discuss her concerns?

On 10/3/2021 at 10:04 AM, londonflo said:

BTW nurses do spend time assisting Physicians with procedures at the bedside while standing for long periods. While her career plans may not involve this type of position, she may want to consider it. 

^^ ^ During a clinical as a student, I stood in place for about 25 minutes waiting to be handed a catheter so I could snip off a tip into a collection cup. Was supposed to be "quick," but the darn thing wouldn't budge out of the patient so there I was. No walking around and most importantly, not touching anything either.

I agree, it's concerning if she can't handle "mundane" or "boring" tasks and it causes syncope.