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USA Weekend Magazine article on Nursing shortage

Nurses   (3,903 Views 28 Comments)
by robred robred (New Member) New Member

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Curious to see if there were any thoughts out there on the article in USA Weekend magazine in today's newspaper on the nursing shortage and the 10 practical tips to help patients and families cope when they find themselves in a hospital...

On a scale of 0-10, 0 is useless and inaccurate and 10 is extremely helpful and accurate, how would u rate the article?

Anything you would add or delete to the 10 suggestions?

I'll add my thoughts later, but am curious to ask for yours.......

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160 Posts; 4,532 Profile Views

Is there anyway to read the article online? I am on assignment and don't get the paper. All my news comes from CNN and the internet!:chuckle

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1,250 Posts; 11,329 Profile Views

This is the url for the article.

http://www.usaweekend.com/03_issues/030831/030831nurses.html

While I found it interesting, the comments about getting foreign nurses and/or designating unliscensed personnel to fill the gap bothered me. As well as the picture of the nurse that is on the front cover.

I did like this part though...."Be aware of shift changes: Nurses rotate between days and evenings. Some may work only three 12-hour shifts in a week, so your family member is likely to have several RNs during a given week. Rest assured that a nurse is assigned to every patient, but it probably will not be the same person more than a few days in a row. So get to know all the nurses. Also, keep in mind that shift changes often are the busiest parts of the day and thus are not a good time to ask a lot of questions. "

and this

"Partner with staff: Ask what you can do to help. Brushing a patient's hair, helping with makeup or shaving, and knowing where to find an extra blanket are just a few of the things visitors are capable of doing. Meal times can be hectic, so be there to help feed the patient, open a carton of milk or take away the tray. Meals are a great time to talk, and in many hospitals they are also a good time to pitch in. Don't be a nuisance, though; your loved one may be on a restricted diet, so don't bring fast food. "

Except they forgot to mention that the nurse or NA must look at the amount left on tray to ascertain I&O for the meal.

Overall, I thought it was a well thought out article and hopefully will help advocate some legislative changes (like CA) with pressure from the public.

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160 Posts; 4,532 Profile Views

Very interesting article! I, too, am bothered by the respresentation of the "nurse" on the article!:eek: I don't think I have EVER seen any of my co-workers dressed like that!:confused:

Unfortunately, the idea of bringing in "foreign" nurses to help the shortage is a reality. They do have to take NCLEX, BUT, as with some of the hospitals in Las Vegas that actively recruits foreign nurses, they bring them over to Calif, where they take the NCLEX numerous times until they pass! Technology here in the US is sometimes far advanced; foreign nurses sometimes have problems with our technology. I probably could take the Bar exam numerous times and finally pass, but that wouldn't make me a good lawyer!:chuckle Oow! Are there good lawyers?:roll

I think something that also could have been addressed in the article is that patients DON'T NEED to stay by their loved ones 24 hours a day, talking to them, entertaining them. They are there to recoup from illness, surgery, injury!

Gee, I am on a roll! ALSO, calling 50 million times in a shift to "see" how their loved one is doing! And all 20 of the relatives! Of course, with HIPPA............won't go there!:devil:

My main focus at work is my patient, their well being and safety! I hope people realize that is my mission while at work!

I would give the article an "7-8". It is a start in informing the public!

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Surgical Hrt RN specializes in Critical Care Baby!!!!!.

123 Posts; 2,650 Profile Views

I saw the article, and while it did have some good points, I was extremely appalled to see that they advocated bringing in other healthcare workers to take some of the workload off the nurses. I think that this will lead to more patients and their families thinking that these workers, professional in their own right, know as much as a nurse does. :(

What a scary thought!!!!!! I am so sick of people trying to replace us! How about increasing the pay scale to draw more nurses into your hospital and more people into the field of nursing. Bodies do NOT in anyway equal competency!!!!:angryfire

I do agree with some of the points in the article, especially about visiting and the importance of rest for the patient. My favorite part was where the author discussed report and shift change as being one of the most busy times. How many times have you been giving/getting report and the family is standing at the desk listening to your report? GRRRRR:eek: This is the absolute worst time to be bothered! Not to mention a violation of HIPPA!

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Hellllllo Nurse has 15 years experience as a BSN, RN.

3 Articles; 3,563 Posts; 20,764 Profile Views

I agree with all of the above! I was especially disburbed by the suggestion of bringing more foreign nurses and giving aides more responsibility. The article did miss the main point of nurses leaving nursing because of working conditions.

I rate the article a 6.

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bellehill has 9 years experience as a RN and specializes in Neuro Critical Care.

566 Posts; 7,348 Profile Views

I thought this was a great article, written so that the general public would understand a little more of the nursing profession. Many of the points made were great; shift change is the busiest time, ask the RN questions, bring a med list to the hospital with you, go home... Although I don't like being replaced by foreign nurses, I have worked with many nurses who were foreign and were awesome. I love family members who are involved with their loved ones care and who help take care of the patient.

One thing I wish it had addressed was the overnight visitor issue. For some reason people think they need to spend the night, get dinner trays and a recliner but not help with the patient; In the meantime they take up any extra room left for the nurse. Overall I would give it an 8.

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142 Posts; 2,830 Profile Views

Overall I gave the article about a 6-7. It did address some good points. As stated above, change of shift, helping out etc.

You know the line they could have put in there that would have made all the difference in the world is:

THESE ARE SOME OF THE THINGS WE CAN DO TO PROTECT OUR LOVED ONES AND SUPPORT THE NURSING STAFF. SHOW THEM WE SUPPORT THEM.

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healingtouchRN specializes in Cardiac/Vascular & Healing Touch.

541 Posts; 4,183 Profile Views

WHERE DID THEY GET HER? I know only one person in town that wears a cap, & she does little else other than give people a headache. This looks like a step back thirty or more years. I wonder if USA Today if that out of step with other things they report on? :confused:

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63 Posts; 2,001 Profile Views

Overall I thought that the article was helpful for patients and their families to understand what goes on in the workday. However, I agree with the above that the way they represented the nurse on the cover is awful. Why not show a picture of a nurse is what they really wear from day today? Also I thought that they could touch a little bit more on why nurses were leaving the profession. Overall I would rate the article a 5.

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SharonH, RN has 20 years experience and specializes in Med/Surg, Geriatrics.

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That was a really good article except for that silly picture and advocating "solutions" like giving more responsibility to CNAs and importing foreign nurses. Next time, they need to do their research, there are rarely enough CNAs to do the work that they are already trained to do, why would you want to give them more responsibility? Ultimately that would result in more work for the nurse.

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Tweety has 28 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Med-Surg, Trauma, Ortho, Neuro, Cardiac.

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I kind of feel like the others, a bit bothered by the picture because that's not the nurse of 2003. Like the quote "Also, keep in mind that shift changes often are the busiest parts of the day and thus are not a good time to ask a lot of questions. "

I've seen the foreign nurse solution work well. We've recruited a dozen Filiopino nurses this year and they are EXCELLENT, EXCELLENT, EXCELLENT! No, they aren't taking jobs from Americans, because those postions have been open for years. The problem arises that if the shortage ends, is there going to be resentment there.

Also, we have Filipino nurses that are still there 25 years after a large group of them came during another crisis. Two of them manage critical care units.

It's another thread about what it does to the folks back in the Phillipines that the USA is taking nurses from them. But they make the choice. Plus they send a lot of dollars back home. So it's a bit of a double edged sword. I am torn on the subject. But that's another thread.

We are also heavily recruiting in Peurto Rico (not a foreign country as they are US citazens) and other Hispanic nations.

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