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Thought I was doing fine... THEN got a call from my manager.... :(

Nurses   (8,112 Views 40 Comments)
by Epona Epona (Member)

Epona works as a Nursing student.

13,377 Visitors; 784 Posts

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Hello everyone!! :p I have been out of orientation for about a month. They gave me an extended orientation because my boss and I thought it was necessary (was a new RN). I have been doing just fine (or so I thought), and then my boss contacted me today to say 'I have to have a mentor (someone to shadow me), because I have asked several questions and get unfocused (according to charge nurses).' WHAT???!!! Yes, if I don't know something, I AM GOING TO ASK. I am new and not going to hurt anyone. If I don't know, I am going to keep asking questions. My boss said this is a good thing and will help me, but I don't know. :rolleyes: She said I was unfocused??? I am many things perhaps, but unfocused is NOT one of them. I have always paid special attention to detail and have been a stellar student all my life (graduated top 10 in my RN program). I feel I have been doing just fine and have had no problems. So this was completely out of the blue.

How would YOU take this?? She told me what the charge nurses had said and some of the things they reported never happened. :uhoh3:

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9,128 Visitors; 672 Posts

If you truly believe that some of the things that they reported never happened I would ask the manager if it would be possible to meet with them as well, with her, to get further clarification on what you needed to work on from their perspective.

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Reigen works as a RN.

4,484 Visitors; 219 Posts

I am sorry to hear that "things said--- never happened". That statement alone certainly brings to my mind the old " eat the young".

I am a well seasoned nurse (23 years next month as a RN and had 8 as a LPN) and I still ask questions. Especially when I take a travel contract- you can bet your paycheck I ask any question that I do not absolutely know the answer to when it comes to specifics to that facility.

How to take this, is a hard question to answer. If things said/ done are not true write a rebuttal ask to have the "others" present for a conference and get this cleared up. When "others" start saying things that really is not truthful, and starts you to double question yourself -- that leads to not trusting your co-workers and making for a hostile work enviroment. I personaly would not be able to trust those co-workers-- if they can't tell the truth about what really happened with a co-worker, are they reporting changes in a patients condidtion correctly to a physician? I would have serious doubts about their ethics. Trust once broken is extremely hard to rebuild.

Good luck

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1,468 Visitors; 33 Posts

Unfortunately, something like that happened to me at my first job. They said I asked too many questions and too many different people. On my end, I did that to validate the info when I did not think that the answer was right/complete. Needless to say, I left the job after 1.5 years. There were many rumors too and they did not seem to believe me over older nurses. So, hang in there at least for a year.

Mentor is a good thing. Use this opportunity to learn!

Good luck!

P.S. At my next job they thought I was a great nurse. All depends on the people you work with.

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Pepper The Cat has 33 years experience and works as a RN.

1 Follower; 24,323 Visitors; 1,692 Posts

Just because you are a stellar student doesn't mean you don't need help adjusting to the work place.

I would accept any help they are offering.

You have been accused of being "unfocused" . Ask for examples. Could you be missing important things because you are focusing on small things? You say you keep asking questions which is good, but are you asking the same questions over and over? We had a new nurse that every time she had to use the glucometer would ask how to use. Over and over and over. Was she a good nurse? yes. Did she need more help? Again - yes.

Just be thankful that they are trying to help you rather than just tell you you aren't working out and let you go.

I am also reminded of a nurse we had who would ask the exact same question of every single nurse that shift. She would only proceed if she got the exact same answer from each nurse. It got really annoying after awhile. She said "she just wanted to make sure she got the right answer" but to us it showed a deep sense of uncertainly and mis-trust. She didn't last long on our unit. We tried to help her, but she was so certain that someone would give her the wrong information because she KNEW that "nurses ate their young" that she never learned and grew. She left of her own accord by the way - we were happy to help her, if only she let us.

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CaLLaCoDe works as a RN.

10,812 Visitors; 1,173 Posts

I agree whole heartedly with the above poster Pepper The Cat. Good advice!

I would like to add: I believe an ideal time to defend yourself against those false reports, would have been when you first heard complaints by your coworkers; however, by defending yourself tomorrow, you may be perceived as too defensive. I would probably just let it go for now and do your best. An extension with orientation is a blessing, you will not regret this!!! Be optimistic, hold your own, things will get better for you!

2 years ago I was being oriented to a telemetry floor when I asked my preceptor how to page the MD using the intranet, she stated that since she had already gone through that with me she would not do it again. Sheesh. Things could be worse!

I think when you're new, having to juggle so much in your head, besides learning the various systems and machines, one could easily appear a little unfocused. "Unfocused" IMHO is a good thing.

Edited by CaLLaCoDe

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Which new grad only a month out of orientation is supposed to be a perfect employee? I can't believe coworkers have the audacity to actually say a new nurse is asking too many questions and is "unfocused". The first months as a new RN are both unnerving and frazzling. I think the fact that they went to the trouble of reporting this rather than trying to show you a little more guidance to help you feel more comfortable is a huge indication on what type of coworkers you have. Do you feel like your coworkers are helpful in general or is everyone out for themselves?

I once worked at a place where people would act like you were asking the most idiotic questions and acting like they were saving the entire universe by answering a question. I just wanted to say to them HELLO, I'VE BEEN HERE 2 WEEKS...YOU'VE BEEN HERE 7 YEARS! DON'T YOU THINK IT'S NATURAL THAT I HAVE A FEW QUESTIONS?

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classicdame works as a Hospital Education Coordinator and adjunct nursing.

2 Articles; 26,028 Visitors; 7,255 Posts

sorry you are having this problem but it could happen to experienced nurses. Sometimes an individual just does not fit that unit. However, I would try to make the most of it, utilize the mentor, and bring to the managers attention any POSITIVE things you are experiencing. For instance, ask satisfied patients to let your boss know they liked your care (card/phone call/leave a note). Most of all, do not let this upset you overly much. You know you are a good nurse. They will know it too, soon enough.

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JenniferSews works as a Nurse Educator.

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Holy cow if I was written up for asking questions I would have been way out the door by now. I ask LOTS of questions. My coworkers don't mind because they are 1- willing to teach and 2- I show myself as competent otherwise, but ask for clarification and/or backup when necessary. The culture at my work allows for us all to ask for help. I have been called in to assess many patients as a second set of eyes on even the most experiences nurses.

If they are offering a mentor, I would take it. Having a mentor made a world of difference to me. I can go and ask any question of her, from "did I handle this coworker situation right" to "what should I do for this patient." No matter how trivial she is there to help me become a good nurse. A mentor isn't a bad thing or a step back, it is a blessing. I wish you the best of luck!

ETA- if they are reporting things that did not happen I would have an open talk with your manager before this gets out of hand.

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4,322 Visitors; 323 Posts

I'm all for making sure you're doing things right but please take a piece of advice I got very early in my career: don't make decisions by committee. How do you know the nurse you are asking is doing something by policy? That's one of the ways you run the risk of getting 10 different answers for questions you ask. The best course of action for questions is often to look up the specific hospital policy or refer to your hospital's chosen nursing text. (I know its time consuming but if something happens that is detrimental, being able to say you followed policy is often a saving grace). Every unit I've ever worked on has used a specific book and edition as their way of doing nursing skills and had a copy on the unit like Kozier and Erb, etc, etc

Sorry you feel blindsided! I know how you feel, I got in trouble once for "being too quiet" and it made the other nurses feel I was unfriendly. I was shocked, I thought I had made some solid connections at the job. Um. Ok? Pardon me for not wanting to be chatty matty at 0300 in the morning.

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davebigs has 4 years experience.

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Try to hang in there for a year if you can. Many nurses, and yes some charge nurses are really idiots. My hospital that I work at has a strict policy of going up the chain of command. If someone has an issue with a nurse, they have to at least attempt to address it with that particular nurse before going to a manager. Many times things can be solved at the local. Stay strong and use this as an experience.

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Epona works as a Nursing student.

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Thanks everyone. The boss said it was 'little things' the other charge nurses were reporting. I have been on my own and handling it pretty well I believe for the last month. :clown: The basic things I have- how to give shots, run fluids, flush IV lines, etc. It's preparing the patient for surgery (knowing to hang Lactated Ringers), how to flush nephrostomy tubes, remove stables, etc. that I ask questions on; things like this that I don't know yet.

I talked to my mom about it and she made some suggestions. I think from now on, I am going to select one or two nurses who I feel are competent and just go to them. Obviously, no more asking charge nurses as they run and complain. :uhoh3: IF I were a charge nurse, I would understand this person is new (we were all new once upon a time), and I would understand that and try to help the person out. I would NOT run to my boss and say "so and so is asking questions." :grn: And some of the things my boss mentioned never happened.

As someone posted- a new grad. and out of orientation ONE MONTH is no pro.

I personally feel like this unit is a zoo and unsafe. :eek: I am praying and hoping I can make it to six months and then transfer somewhere else in the hospital.

Thanks everyone for the advice!!! :hug:

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