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Therapeutic Oils in hospital

Nurses   (7,314 Views | 34 Replies)
by Maeve1982 Maeve1982 (New) New

Maeve1982 has 7 years experience and specializes in ICU, ONC, M/S.

700 Profile Views; 4 Posts

I have heard about oils being used in a hospital setting, but that's just it. Hearing bits and pieces only. I know for me personally, essential oils (I use Doterra), have helped me tremendously and I'm just wondering if anyone has used, for example, lavender for calmness and relaxation or any other oils to help patients in any way.

Any responses will be helpful. Thanks!

xoxo

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blondy2061h has 15 years experience as a MSN, RN and specializes in Oncology.

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We use peppermint oil to cover up smells, but other than that, no.

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126 Posts; 2,722 Profile Views

I work in peds and essential oils are very popular among the patient's parents. In essence, our hospitalists do not prescribe this, it is more so a personal choice for each family.

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klone has 14 years experience as a MSN, RN and specializes in Women's Health/OB Leadership.

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I think that essential oils to cure everything from epilepsy to ADHD to cancer is the biggest scam since homeopathy.

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klone has 14 years experience as a MSN, RN and specializes in Women's Health/OB Leadership.

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To clarify - I know that some essential oils have antimicrobial properties and are good for minor skin issues, like rashes, fungus or bug bites. I also believe that a bit of lavender EO, massaged behind the ears or at the temple can help some people with headaches. Beyond that, IMO, it's hogwash. If anyone who has drunk the essential oil koolaid has some peer-reviewed research stating otherwise, I will be the first to eat my words.

Some of the Doterra (and the other brand I can't remember the name) peddlers on Facebook are absolutely ridiculous and zealous in all the things they think essential oils can cure.

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meanmaryjean has 40 years experience as a DNP, RN and specializes in NICU, ICU, PICU, Academia.

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We do have an aromatherapy program at our hospital, primarily our peds oncology patients. Problem is the nurses (like me) with asthma.

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liberated847 has 10 years experience and specializes in CEN, CFRN, PHRN, RCIS, EMT-P.

504 Posts; 5,598 Profile Views

This is mostly pseudoscience, steer clear as the recommended use may cause patients not to seek proper medical care.

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RN. has 29 years experience as a MSN, RN and specializes in Perianesthesia.

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There are studies that support peppermint oil encourages micturition.

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firstinfamily has 33 years experience as a RN.

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I have never used essential oils in my nursing care. I personally benefit from Lavender and love the sensation it gives, calming. My question is this: Are these considered fire hazards?? When I see the word oil I think of possible flameable ingredients. We could not use any vaseline(petroleum) products with pts who were on oxygen due to fire potential. Is this considered a component of Holistic Nursing??

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klone has 14 years experience as a MSN, RN and specializes in Women's Health/OB Leadership.

6 Followers; 13,573 Posts; 119,359 Profile Views

There are studies that support peppermint oil encourages micturition.

Yes, that's an OB nurse's trick - put a few drops of peppermint oil in the hat postpartum when a woman is having difficulty voiding.

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T-Bird78 has 6 years experience.

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This is mostly pseudoscience, steer clear as the recommended use may cause patients not to seek proper medical care.

Glad I'm not the only skeptic. A FB friend swears by them and uses them instead of seeking medical attention. I don't see how smelling or rubbing a drop of oil on your skin clears up a sinus infection. Maybe I'm missing something?

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Here.I.Stand has 16 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in SICU, trauma, neuro.

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This past summer, a friend from church invited me to an oil party her sister was hosting. I don't remember the company but it was one of those MLMs. Anyway, she was handing out sample-size vials and these little tri-fold cards w/ an A-to-Z list of conditions allegedly treated w/ essential oils. It was scary. I kid you not, HIV and TB were on that list. (I wonder if they've updated it to include ebola??)

Some of them do smell delicious, and I can see them having an aromatherapeutic effect, but medicinal effect? I'd need to see the evidence, please.

So that said, we do not have them on our hospital's formulary, but some families use them. One daughter recently put some on her dad's feet that must have had sandalwood in it. It really did smell nice! But I was also wondering, what if I'd had perfume-induced asthma like meanmaryjean? That would be a huge pain to switch assignments in the middle of the shift, and nobody asked first if it was okay to use the oil. I do have asthma--just don't have issues w/ scents--and I know I could not work while coughing and wheezing!

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